Search:
Login:
OR

Marijuana Blog

Americans Want Legal States Left Alone

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
legal-states-want-cannabis-lect-aloneSupport for marijuana in America is greater than ever. With more states working towards legalizing the plant, more and more people want to gain profits from the industry. Many jobs would be created with legalization and there is a great deal of money to be made. But seeing as how the Federal Government won’t stop interfering with legal and medical states, the legal marijuana industry is still suffering, even when state laws are being followed. 
 
 
In a report released on Monday by Third Way says that 60% of American voters believe that the states should decide whether or not they want legal cannabis. 67% want a new federal law that would make states that legalize recreational or medical cannabis a “safe haven” against the US laws against cannabis, as long as the states show that they have a strong regulatory framework for the business. 
 
 
When the Obama administration issuing guidance urging federal prosecutors to refrain from going after state-legal marijuana operations, advocates for cannabis were positive. But with arrest rates for cannabis high than ever and the amount of raids happening increasing all the time, it’s clear that this “guidance” didn’t do much to prevent legal state from being harassed by the feds. Twenty-three states have opted for legalizing cannabis for medical purposes while another four allow for recreational use of cannabis. The federal government seems to be okay with simply spending all of their time and funding going after people who don’t deserve it.
 
 
Third Way proposed that a federal “waiver” system where the states would be allowed to act outside of federal marijuana prosecution. As long as the states have a presentable regulatory system that was in place and could be re-evaluated every once in a while. “This ‘waive but restrict’ framework would provide consistency and protect public safety more effectively than either current law or the other policy proposals on the table."

Comments

Space Queen (Hybrid)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder

Comments

Shake Well - Stoner problems = )

Category: Fun | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder

shake-well


Comments

Teen Marijuana Use Declines As More States Legalize Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
teen-marijuana-use-downThe federal government’s National Institute on Drug Abuse released its annual Monitoring the Future survey today. Monitoring the Future is now in its 40th year and is considered the ‘gold standard’ of teen drug use surveys. It surveys 40,000 to 50,000 students in 8th, 10th and 12th grade in schools nationwide about their use of alcohol, legal and illegal drugs and cigarettes.
 
Marijuana use in the past year by students in all three grades declined slightly, from 26% in 2013 to 24% in 2014. The survey also found that students in 8th and 10th grades reported that marijuana is less available than it once was. Also, daily marijuana use among 12th graders is down, from 6.5% in 2013 to 5.8% in 2014.
 
These declines in marijuana use among teens follow the implementation of the nation’s first marijuana legalization laws in Colorado and Washington. Those laws were adopted in 2012, and retail sales of marijuana in those states began earlier this year. Each of the marijuana legalization laws clearly specify that legalization applies to adults 21 and over, and contain built-in safeguards that restrict sales to minors. Last month, voters in Alaska, Oregon and Washington, D.C. also decisively passed initiatives to legalize marijuana in those jurisdictions.
 
“The results from the Monitoring the Future survey showing a decline in teen marijuana use – even as legalization initiatives have passed – is very encouraging, though not surprising,” said Marsha Rosenbaum, PhD, of the Drug Policy Alliance. “Now that the national conversation about marijuana is ‘above ground,’ parents and teachers are able have honest conversations with teens based on sound science, health, and safety. The declines in use revealed in MTF may well indicate that teens are listening, and choosing to make wise decisions.”
 
Rosenbaum is the author of the influential publication Safety First: A Reality-Based Approach to Teens and Drugs. Earlier this month, DPA released a revised edition ofSafety First with new sections addressing marijuana legalization and adolescent brain development.
 
Over half of teens (56%) say they would not try marijuana, even it were legal for adults. Some opponents of marijuana legalization have speculated that use will increase with the expansion of legally regulated marijuana. Rather, the findings from Monitoring the Future echo the results of other studies on marijuana laws and underage use.
 
Numerous researchers have looked at the extent of teen marijuana use in states where medical marijuana is legal. Their findings, published in prestigious journals such as the American Journal of Public Health and the Journal of Adolescent Health, generally show no association between changes in marijuana laws and rates of teenage marijuana use. A 2012 study published in the Annals of Epidemiology found that medical marijuana laws actually “decreased past-month use among adolescents…and had no discernible effect on the perceived riskiness of monthly use.” Preliminary data from the 2013 Healthy Kids Colorado Survey, released by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) in August of 2014, found that high school marijuana use in the past month slightly decreased from 22 percent in 2011to 20 percent in 2013.
 

Comments

Afgoo - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder

Comments

Oregon Begins To Implement Legal Cannabis

Category: News | Posted on Wed, December, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
oregon-to-implement-legal-cannabisThis past November, Oregon joined Colorado and Washington in the recreational cannabis legalization movement, along with Alaska. The state now needs to come up with a plan on how to regulate and tax the plant so that legal sales go smoothly. The Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board approved funding Wednesday, totaling around $600,000, for the Liquor Control Commission to begin making the rules regarding legal cannabis.
 
 
With this funding, the commission would hire four workers. These four would include a program manager, two policy analysts, and a public affairs staffer. Even though there will just be these four to start out with, the state estimates that the regulation of recreational marijuana would end up including up to thirty workers. 
 
 
Taxes from the legal marijuana sales are estimated to eventually to cover the costs for the regulatory system. The money that was approved for spending on Wednesday will come from the sales of liquor in the state and once the market for marijuana gets going, must be paid back with interest. Which means a ton of extra money for the state, along with the money made from commercial sales, reported to start sometime in 2016. But as of July 1st, personal possession and home grown pot are legal in the state of Oregon.
 
 
Building these systems to regulate cannabis are important, even though the laws can sometimes be frustrating. Oregon will hopefully rake in the same amount of revenue as Colorado and Washington, sending the funds to school, public workers, roads, and other issues that happen within state lines. Considering how high the taxes on marijuana are, the states stand to make considerable gains by legalizing cannabis. 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
13.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles ,
16.2 Miles Away | Agoura Hills ,
8.6 Miles Away | West Hollywood ,
December 17, 2014 | Category: Culture
December 17, 2014 | Category: Nugs
December 17, 2014 | Category: Fun
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us