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Pre 98 Bubba Kush

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

pre-98-bubba-kush

pre98bubba pre-98-bubba pre-98-bubba-5

Pre 98 Bubba Kush

A very sweet, earthy strain that is almost pure Indica. Bubba Kush provides an intense and relaxing high that starts in your head and moves down into your body. It is a cross between the two popular strains Bubble Gum and Kush, and distinct enough to earn its own name.


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Everyone in Colorado may get a pot tax refund

Category: News | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder
everyone-in-co-may-be-getting-a-cannabis-tax-refundThanks to Colorado's new pot tax and a quirky state law, residents may get a special one-time tax refund next year.
 
The total could be about $59 million. That's how much the state expects to collect from taxes on the sale of recreational marijuana, which Colorado legalized last year. Some of that money was slated for schools, but it may go back into taxpayers' pockets instead.
 
The reason for the refund: Colorado is expected to collect more in total tax revenue than it thought it would this year. That's not permitted in a year the state rolls out a new tax, which this time was the 28% pot tax.
 
The pot tax itself didn't generate as much money as expected.
 
But the state is poised to take in $219 million more in total revenue than it thought it would during the current fiscal year, which ends June 30.
 
Here's what happened.
 
Whenever a new tax is implemented, a law in Colorado aimed at protecting taxpayers' rights goes into effect.
 
It requires the state to estimate its total annual tax collections, and that number effectively serves as a cap on the amount of taxes it can keep.
 
Colorado issued such an estimate when it introduced the pot tax, and now it looks all but certain that total state taxes will surpass that threshold.
 
"We would have to experience a pretty significant economic downturn between now and June not to be in excess [of the cap]," said Phyllis Resnick, an economist at Colorado State University.
 
That means a refund is likely in order. And under the law, the state will have to give back the money collected from the new tax -- the $59 million or so it expects to collect on pot sales.
 

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What's packed in your Joint today?

Category: Fun | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

whats-in-your-j


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NYPD Commissioner's Statement Linking Marijuana And Increased Shootings Is Reefer Madness

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder
marijuana-and-crime-issuesNYPD Commissioner Bratton gave a press conference about the rising number of shootings in NYC. Bratton went on to blame marijuana for the increase in violence.
 
Statement from gabriel sayegh, Managing Director of Policy & Campaigns for the Drug Policy Alliance:
 
“Commissioner Bratton’s claims today about marijuana are straight out of the tired old drug war handbook and frankly, are ridiculous. What evidence is Bratton relying on in making these statements? Hasn’t he heard that correlation does not equal causation? Marijuana is the most widely used illicit substance in the U.S. and in New York and, therefore, is far more likely to be found on New Yorkers than any other drug. It appears that finding marijuana on the scene of a violent crime is enough for Bratton to assert a causal link. Using that rationale, we can make other causal links to violence – for instance, if police find a cell phone at the scene of a violent crime, then certainly the cell phone must cause that crime.
 
If, indeed, there is violence in the illicit marijuana marketplace between those who are selling marijuana, there is one very basic and smart way to solve that problem: end marijuana prohibition. Prohibition is the absence of control, and by legalizing and regulating marijuana, we can regulate the marijuana marketplace. If Bratton wants to end the violence in the illicit marijuana marketplace, he should support the Marijuana Regulation and Taxation Act introduced by Senator Liz Krueger and Assemblywoman Crystal Peoples-Stokes. We know more policing won’t fix these problems. If Commissioner Bratton is serious about the health and safety of New Yorkers he needs to let go of the outdated and dangerous reefer madness propaganda. It’s time for a new approach.”
 

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Cotton Candy - Sativa

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

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Jury acquits grower who cited medical need for marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Tue, March, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder
jury-acquits-man-of-growing-mj-for-medical-useIt worked.
 
For the first time in Florida history, a Broward jury acquitted a marijuana grower after finding he has a medical need for the illegal drug.
 
Jesse Teplicki hid nothing from the detectives who showed up at his Hollywood home two years ago acting on a tip that he was growing pot on the premises. And he hid nothing from the jury on Thursday when he took the stand at his criminal trial, even admitting that he smoked a marijuana cigarette earlier in the day to treat the nausea and suppressed appetite that had been plaguing him for decades.
 
Teplicki is the first defendant in Florida to argue medical need in a marijuana case. The jury of four women and two men deliberated for less than an hour before returning its verdict.
 
"You saved my life," a tearful Teplicki told three jurors who stayed in the courtroom after they were discharged by Broward Circuit Judge Michael Ian Rothschild.
 
Manufacture of cannabis is a felony punishable by up to five years in prison. Teplicki, 50, had rejected several plea offers, admitting his actions but referring to the plant as "medicine" he needs to function. Teplicki has suffered from anorexia since age 9, according to trial testimony.
 
Medical need has worked as a defense before, but it's never been tried in front of a jury. In two cases dating back more than 20 years, marijuana smokers have defended themselves at trial before a judge. In each case, the judge convicted the defendants only to see appeals courts overturn their decisions and order not-guilty verdicts.
 
Rothschild warned Teplicki that the verdict does not change Florida law. Marijuana remains illegal to grow, possess and sell. But Teplicki was never accused of selling pot. He did not say how he plans to secure marijuana in the future.
 
Prosecutor Kathleen O'Brien argued that Teplicki had failed to demonstrate the "medical need" central to his defense. She faulted Teplicki for not only self-medicating, but for also self-diagnosing, never seeking alternative treatments that do not involve breaking the law. "There was no follow-up by a treating physician," she said.
 
"This is an historic decision in the state of Florida," said defense lawyer Michael C. Minardi. "Hopefully prosecutors heed the decision and are less likely to prosecute this kind of case in the future."
 
The State Attorney's Office can decline to prosecute cases when it appears the defendant has an argument that is likely to prevail at trial.
 
Minardi said he is considering a civil action to prevent the state from prosecuting Teplicki if he starts growing marijuana again. "We need to protect his right," he said. "The criminal issue was decided by a jury."
 

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