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Category: Fun | Posted on Thu, June, 5th 2014 by THCFinder

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New Study: Marijuana Doesn't Increase Risk Of Psychosis, Alcohol Does

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, June, 5th 2014 by THCFinder
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A study published in last month’s issue of the journal Schizophrenia Research has found that cannabis use, regardless of how much and how often, does not increase an individual’s risk of psychosis.
 
For the study, “170 people at CHR of psychosis were assessed at baseline on severity of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis using the Alcohol and Drug Use Scale. Participants were recruited across three sites over a four year period as part of the Enhancing the Prospective Prediction of Psychosis (PREDICT) study. Predictors of conversion to psychosis were examined using Cox proportional hazards models.”
 
After conducting the study, researchers found that “low use of alcohol, but neither cannabis use nor tobacco use at baseline, contributed to the prediction of psychosis in the CHR sample.”
 

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Purple Martian Kush

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, June, 5th 2014 by THCFinder

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Is Eating Marijuana Really Riskier Than Smoking It?

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, June, 5th 2014 by THCFinder
eating-vs-smoking-mj
As more states are on the road to legalizing medical marijuana, a different pot conversation has heated up: The potential health risks of consuming marijuana-infused edibles. The New York Times’ Maureen Dowd even documented her own experience with edible pot in the form of a candy bar, which left her “curled up in a hallucinatory state for the next eight hours.” There have certainly been reports of ER doctors in Colorado seeing more patients with intoxication from pot-infused edibles, as well as some startling incidents of psychotic behavior and deaths from the products. But is edible pot really any worse than the inhaled version? Or have people just discovered a new plaything that they just don’t know how to work?
 
The answer is a little bit of both.
 
One of the issues lies in how the two forms of the drug are absorbed and metabolized, and how quickly the high comes on. “The major difference is in the absorption of the [edible] product into the blood stream,” says Kari Franson, PharmD, PhD, Clinical Pharmacologist and Associate Dean for Professional Education, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, at University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy. “Once it is in the blood, it quickly goes to and has an effect on the brain. With smoking, the peak blood levels happen within 3-10 minutes, and with eating, it’s 1-3 hours. Note that both are about a three-fold difference, but most users are willing to wait 10 minutes, not 3 hours before re-using.
 
In other words, it’s easier to self-monitor when smoking a joint, since one feels the effects so quickly. But with edible pot, because there can be an hours-long lag before experiencing the high, you might inadvertently consume an overdose amount while waiting.
 
 
And what you already have in your system matters more with edible marijuana – whether you’ve eaten recently or not, or have other meds in your body can also affect how the active ingredient, THC, is metabolized. These variables can change “the amount in the blood five-fold,” says Franson. “The THC will compete for metabolism in the liver with other drugs. Things that are inhaled can go directly to the brain and not have these interactions. So even confident users can get surprised with an edible.”
 
Another, trickier issue is that it’s very difficult to know what you’re getting when you eat a pot-infused candy bar or other edible. Though there have been recent attempts to regulate it, Franson says she’s still skeptical about the standardization of the product. Laboratory tests have shown that the actual amount of THC can vary widely in either direction, with some products containing more and some less than the amount indicated on the packaging’s “nutritional information.” A new law requires more rigorous testing of edible products in an effort to standardize the amount of THC, and remove from the shelves that ones that exceed the maximum 100 mg of the active ingredient. But time will tell how, if at all, this will reduce the risk.
 
The symptoms of an overdose from edible marijuana are similar to that from inhaled version, but apparently have the potential to be more severe, for some of the reasons mentioned above. Like smoked pot, the symptoms can be both physical and psychological in nature.
 

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Blackberry Kush Nugs (Indica)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, June, 3rd 2014 by THCFinder

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Blackberry Kush - Indica

Blackberry Kush is a mostly Indica Kush with a strong blackberry smell and pink and red hairs. It truly lives up to its name, with a remarkably strong blackberry / piney / hashy smell. As a potent Indica, Blackberry Kush is couchlock weed, and so it is not recommended for high-activity moments.


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Big Tobacco Planned Big Marijuana Sales in the 1970s

Category: News | Posted on Tue, June, 3rd 2014 by THCFinder
mj-tobacco-big-mj-salesDocuments buried deep in tobacco company archives reveal a hope and a plan to sell marijuana as soon as legally possible
 
Tobacco executives anticipated the legalization of marijuana as early as the 1970′s — and they wanted a piece of the action, according to newly discovered documents from tobacco company archives.
 
Public health researchers scanned 80 million pages of digitized company documents for keywords such as, “marijuana,” “cannabis,” “reefer,” “weed,” “spliffs,” and “blunts.” The results, published Tuesday in the Milbank Quarterly, reveal a long history of maneuvers toward marijuana-laced products.
 
“The starting point must be to learn how to produce in quantity cigarettes loaded uniformly with a known amount of either ground cannabis or dried and cut cannabis rag,” read one memorandum from British American Tobacco’s adviser on technical research, Charles Ellis.
 
A hand-written letter from Philip Morris president George Weissman read, “While I am opposed to its use, I recognize that it may be legalized in the near future…Thus, with these great auspices, we should be in a position to examine: 1. A potential competition, 2. A possible product, 3. At this time, cooperate with the government.”
 
Philip Morris even went so far as to request a marijuana sample from the Department of Justice for research purposes, promising to share its findings with the government so long as the company’s involvement remained strictly confidential. “We request that there be no publicity whatsoever,” wrote a Philip Morris executive. The Justice Department drug science’s chief Milton Joffee obliged with a promise to deliver “good quality” marijuana.
 
While tobacco executives missed the mark on legalization by several decades, they did lay out a persuasive case for vigilance. In early 1970, an unsigned memorandum distributed to Philip Morris’ top management read, “We are in the business of relaxing people who are tense and providing a pick up for people who are bored or depressed. The human needs that our product fills will not go away. Thus, the only real threat to our business is that society will find other means of satisfying these needs.”
 
The study authors said the documents provide proof of tobacco companies’ intent to enter the marijuana trade, despite their claims to the contrary. They urged policymakers to prevent tobacco makers from entering the nascent market for legal marijuana “in a way that would replicate the smoking epidemic, which kills 480,000 Americans each year.”
 
Source: http://time.com

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