Search:
Login:
OR

Marijuana Blog

Colorado Lawmakers Approve First Cannabis Banking System In The World

Category: News | Posted on Tue, May, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
co-bank-systemWe recently posted that Colorado lawmakers shot down marijuana banking rules. We added ‘for now’ to the title, because we felt that marijuana banking rules in Colorado was far from a dead issue. It didn’t take long for the issue to come up again in the Colorado Legislature, and we here at the ICBC are happy to say that this time banking rules were approved.
 
Per the Huffington Post:
 
“The bill approved Wednesday would allow marijuana businesses to pool money in cooperative s, but the co-ops would on take effect if the U.S. Federal Reserve agrees to allow them to do things like accept credit cards or checks.
 
Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper supports the pot bank plan and is expected to sign it into law, though a spokesman said Wednesday the governor had yet to review the final language.”
 
This is a big thing for not only members of the Colorado cannabis industry, but members of the industry throughout the United States and the rest of the world. No other country has a banking system dedicated to the marijuana industry. We’re hopeful that when the banking industry (and federal lawmakers) see how well this works, that national reform will be soon to follow.
 
There are still some questions that need to be answered. The first of which is ‘how will this work?’ It looks great on paper, and is certainly better than nothing, but how will it work out in reality? Also, how will the federal government react to this bill if/when it’s signed into law? How do the federal guidelines affect the Colorado rules, if at all? Only time will tell, but it is great to see legislators take up this very important issue. At our conference in September, we will have a panel devoted to banking. Stay tuned as more states make similar moves and we continue to work at the federal level to bring about real banking reform.
 

Comments

Strawberry Kush

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, May, 13th 2014 by THCFinder

strawberry-kush-weed

strawberry-kush-2

Strawberry Kush - Indica

Strawberry Kush (Strawberry Cough x OG Kush) is a California sensation and a growers dream as the OG Kush helps to hulk out the notoriously finicky and low yielding Strawberry Cough. The smell is very fruity (like Strawberries) with earthy and chemy overtones from the OG. The taste of more typical of Chemdawg, with a fruity aftertaste. The effect is a very uplifting sativa high.


Comments

8 Lies We Have to Stop Telling About Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, May, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
8-lies-about-marijuana
Legal marijuana will lead to criminals smashing through your door and stealing your money. 
 
Marijuana has no medical use.
 
Do these claims sound familiar? Drug warriors have been extremely successful in alarming America about the dangers of marijuana for decades. But where they haven't been successful is spreading accurate information about ganja to the populace.
 
Here are 8 of the top myths people tell about marijuana, and how to rebut them.
 
1. Marijuana is a gateway drug.
 
Marijuana's opponents claim marijuana is a "gateway drug" — that once someone smokes marijuana, they're much more likely to try other, harder drugs and eventually end up using something much more dangerous. There is, in fact, a correlation between marijuana use and other drugs: The National Institute on Drug Abuse claims that a person who smokes weed is 104x more likely to use cocaine than someone who never touched a joint.
 
But that's all it is — a correlation. As TIME's Healthland wrote all the way back in 2010, scientists have discarded the gateway hypothesis since the 90s. A report on the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999 said that:
 
"In the sense that marijuana use typically precedes rather than follows initiation of other illicit drug use, it is indeed a "gateway" drug. But because underage smoking and alcohol use typically precede marijuana use, marijuana is not the most common, and is rarely the first, "gateway" to illicit drug use. There is no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs."
 
And the majority of marijuana users never touch cocaine or heroin. In 2009, 2.3 million people reported trying pot, compared to 617,000 for cocaine and 180,000 for heroin.
 
The Marijuana Policy Project says that 107 million Americans (nearly 40% of the country) have tried marijuana, while only 37 million have tried heroin and less than 0.1% of Americans have used either in the past month. Spokesman Morgan Fox says marijuana has never been demonstrated to have any chemical component that would make it particularly dangerous and that if there is a gateway, it's because dealers have an incentive to push other illegal drugs on buyers.
 
"When you go to a liquor store for a bottle of wine, there isn't a person there trying to sell you cocaine or other dangerous products," he says. "An illegal narcotics dealer has incentive to push dangerous drugs."
 
Another study of 12th graders published in the Journal of School Health indicated that if there is a "gateway drug," there's more evidence to point towards alcohol as the culprit. A 2012 review of the evidence in Drug and Alcohol Dependence for the gateway drug hypothesis noted that 83.2% of hard drug users in Japan had never touched cannabis, while noting that the theory of a variety of gateway behaviors stood up to more rigorous review.
 
Reason's Jacob Sullum wrote that the gateway drug hypothesis' "durability is largely due to its ambiguity: Because it's rarely clear what people mean when they say that pot smoking leads to the use of 'harder' drugs, the claim is difficult to disprove."
 
2. It's as dangerous as LSD or heroin.
 
This argument is based off of the DEA's list of controlled substances, which places marijuana among "the most dangerous drugs," "with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." Schedule I drugs are said to leave users with "potentially severe psychological or physical dependence," and in addition to weed, that list includes heroin, (LSD), ecstasy, methaqualone, and peyote.
 
That's some pretty hefty, dangerous-sounding company. But in 2010, 38,329 people died from drug overdoses. Pharmaceutical drugs killed 22,134 people, of which opoid analgesics killed 16,651. An additional 25,692 people died from alcohol overdoses (for comparison, the CDC says that alcohol kills 88,000 a year including conditions like liver failure and drunken driving accidents).
 
But in not a single documented case has marijuana killed someone from overdose — technically, with a lethal dose that would require ingesting the THC of at least dozens and probably hundreds of pounds of marijuana or more, it's less lethal than water. Even the National Institute on Drug Abuse admits that it's "not very likely" you could overdose on marijuana, while still warning users they can experience anxiety attacks or get in marijuana-related accidents.
 
So by the most obvious metric of marijuana's danger — whether or not you can die or even be seriously injured through an overdose — the answer is plainly no.
 
Other Schedule I and even Schedule II drugs like meth and cocaine are plainly far more dangerous. That might explain why 38% of the country has tried it and walked away fine from the experience.
 
3. It's causing an epidemic of car crashes.
 
But if we were going to settle on another metric of how dangerous marijuana is — how many car crashes it causes — marijuana is still not anywhere near as dangerous as other illicit drugs. In general, the performance of drivers on THC is not impacted nearly as much as drivers on alcohol. A 2004 observational case study in Accident Analysis and Prevention found that "no increased risk for road trauma was found for drivers exposed to cannabis," while alcohol and benzodiazepines were linked to vehicular accidents.
 
There's some bad news here: a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology that assessed 23,591 road fatalities found that the presence of cannabis in a dead driver rose from 4.2% in 1999 to 12.2% in 2010. But since THC can be present in blood for days after use, it's unclear how many drivers were actually high at the time of the accident. Furthermore, alcohol was found in over three times as many drivers — around 39.7%.
 
Additionally, car crash fatalities have been trending downwards for years. There were 51,091 fatalities in 1980, 41,945 in 2000, 37,171 in 2008, and 25,580 in 2012. So even if marijuana use has increased, American roads are still getting safer.
 
As Jenny Hollander writes for Bustle:
 
"Here's what we do know: Stoned drivers behave differently from drunk drivers. Stoned drivers are more aware that they’re intoxicated — the opposite applies for drunk drivers — and so they tend to actually drive more slowly and carefully. Therefore, drivers who are a little stoned are generally safer drivers than those who are a little drunk. As a rule, drunk driving has been understood to be far more dangerous than driving when high."
 
So while no one would advise getting high and driving, there's no solid evidence that marijuana-related traffic fatalities are a major national epidemic.
 
4. Pot smoking leads to more crime.
 
Sheriff Tom Allman of Mendocio County, Calif., had a warning for Colorado residents three months after they voted to legalize marijuana in Nov. 2012: "Thugs put on masks, they come to your house, they kick in your door. They point guns at you and say, 'Give me your marijuana, give me your money.'"
 
"Expect more crime, more kids using marijuana and pot for sale everywhere," said Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver in 2012. "I think our entire state will pay the price."
 
But Denver crime rates remained stable and in some places actually fell. (Arson was up 109% from the same period, but represented just 23 of 3,757 crimes — so if you want to blame every count on smouldering doobies, whatever.)
 
A study in PLOS One that examined states which legalized medical marijuana over the period 1990-2006 found that there were actually minor reductions in the homicide and aggravated assault rate.
 
It's debatable whether legalizing marijuana has a substantial downward effect on the crime rate. But what's clear is that looser marijuana laws have not been behind any noteworthy crime waves. And what's more, fewer people are going to jail in Colorado now that marijuana has been legalized.
 

Comments

Hells OG Wax

Category: Concentrates | Posted on Mon, May, 12th 2014 by THCFinder

hells-og-wax


Comments

Washington family faces federal charges for marijuana despite state law

Category: News | Posted on Mon, May, 12th 2014 by THCFinder
wa-family-facing-charges-for-marijuana
The Justice Department announced last year that nonviolent, small-time drug offenders should not face lengthy prison sentences. Photograph: Ted S Warren/AP
The green-cross storefronts of medical marijuana dispensaries are common in much of Washington, and the state is ploughing ahead with licensing people to grow and sell recreational pot to adults.
 
But a federal trial for five people in Spokane, scheduled to begin in the coming weeks, suggests not all is OK with weed in the state.
 
Larry Harvey, a 70-year-old medical marijuana patient with no criminal history, three of his relatives and a family friend each face mandatory minimum sentences of at least 10 years in prison after they were caught growing about 70 pot plants on their rural, mountainous property.
 
The Harveys had guns at their home, which is part of the reason for the lengthy possible prison time. They say the weapons were for hunting and protection, but prosecutors say two of the guns were loaded and in the same room as a blue plastic tub of pot.
 
Medical marijuana advocates have cried foul, arguing the prosecution violates Department of Justice policies announced by Attorney General Eric Holder last year – that nonviolent, small-time drug offenders should not face lengthy prison sentences.
 
"This case is another glaring example of what's wrong with the federal policy on cannabis," said Kari Boiter, Washington state coordinator for the medical marijuana group Americans for Safe Access.
 
Assistant US attorney Joe Harrington, a spokesman for the US attorney's office in Spokane, said he could not discuss the trial or the office's general approach to pot crimes.
 
But the case illustrates discrepancies in how law enforcement officials are handling marijuana cases as Washington, with the Justice Department's blessing, moves ahead with its grand experiment in pot legalisation.
 
Medical marijuana gardens the size of the Harveys' rarely draw attention from authorities in the Seattle area.
 

Comments

What's your favorite type of music to listen to while High?

Category: Fun | Posted on Mon, May, 12th 2014 by THCFinder

fav-music-while-getting-high


Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
13.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles ,
16.2 Miles Away | Agoura Hills ,
8.6 Miles Away | West Hollywood ,
December 18, 2014 | Category: Medical Marijuana
December 18, 2014 | Category: Culture
December 18, 2014 | Category: News
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us