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Allstar Blake Griffin Endorses Medical Marijuana Use In The NBA

Category: Celebrities | Posted on Thu, April, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
blake-griffin-endorses-mmjIn an interview with Rolling Stone yesterday, Blake Griffin of the Los Angeles Clippers voiced his support of medical marijuana use to treat pain in the NBA.  Currently, the NBA has strict penalties for drug use, which typically lead to suspensions and fines. It was only in 2011 that the NBA stopped testing for marijuana use in the off-season, but now that marijuana is in the limelight, its place in the NBA, as a form of medical treatment for pain, has come into question.
 
Griffin was asked:
 
The NFL might let players use medical marijuana to treat pain. If you had a vote, would the NBA do the same?
 
It doesn’t really affect me, but so many guys would probably benefit from it and not take as many painkillers, which have worse long-term effects. So I would vote yes. I just think it makes sense.
 
Griffin joins the chorus of other outspoken athletes like Larry Sanders of the Milwaukee Bucks, who said earlier this year, “I believe in marijuana and the medical side of it.”
 
Like any professional sport, the need for painkillers is a part of the game, and, as Griffin pointed out, the harmful long-term effects of some painkillers makes medical marijuana use an alluring alternative. Even the World Anti-Doping Agency and the UFC have begun by changing their thresholds of permissible amounts of marijuana.
 

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Blue Power

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, April, 17th 2014 by THCFinder

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Marijuana: The Natural Viagra?

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, April, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
natural-viagra-marijuana
“I discovered the cure last night,” my friend Celia* announced. Ever since going on antidepressants, she’d been suffering from a common SSRI side effect: difficulty achieving orgasm. “And the cure is, wine and weed and half a tablet of Cialis.” She’d discovered it “by accident” while dating a jazz blogger who liked to toke. She needed all three components, working in concert, to achieve that which had once come naturally: “Smoking weed has always been awesome for my sex life. It makes orgasm much easier. I felt like a teenager, only I was also using a drug meant for elderly men, so I guess I felt like a retiree?” A retiree in California, I suggested, or another state where medical marijuana soothes the elderly. “Yeah, like those cool retirees you see on CNN these days,” she agreed. High and sexually enhanced — the ideal here was an aging hippie with a medical-marijuana card and a boner-pill prescription.
 
Marijuana has been cited as an aphrodisiac in ancient texts and folk medicine, but treating sexual dysfunction is not among the approved uses for medical marijuana in the states where it is legal. But that doesn’t mean users — both legal and illegal — aren’t enjoying sexual side effects. “I believe there are three broad categories of usefulness for this remarkably nontoxic drug. Two of them are quite available, namely, recreation and medicine,” explains Dr. Lester Grinspoon, the retired Harvard Medical School professor known as “the grandfather of modern medicinal cannabis research.” “But there’s a third category, the capacity to enhance a variety of human experiences. There’s one that comes to everybody: the capacity to turn an ordinary dish into an extraordinary culinary experience. And the second is sexual experience.”
 
“That CB1 receptor seems to be involved in improved tactile sensations and general euphoria,” says Dr. Mitch Earleywine, professor of psychology at the State University of New York at Albany. Or, as Celia put it, “Marijuana makes your whole body feel good, so it only follows that sex feels good, too.”
 

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Maui Blue

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder

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Study: Marijuana legalization doesn't increase crime

Category: Legalization | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-legalization-doesnt-increase-crime
Three months after Colorado residents legalized recreational marijuana with the passage of Amendment 64 in Nov. 2012, Sheriff Tom Allman of Mendocio County, Calif. – a haven for marijuana growers – warned that an onslaught of crime was headed toward Colorado.
 
“Thugs put on masks, they come to your house, they kick in your door. They point guns at you and say, ‘Give me your marijuana, give me your money,’” Allman told a Denver TV station in February. His state became the first to legalize marijuana for medical use in 1996; Colorado followed suit in 2000. 
 
But a new report contends that fourteen years later, even after Colorado legalized the sale of small amounts of marijuana for recreational use on Jan. 1 of this year, violent and property crime rates in the city are actually falling.
 
According to data from the Denver Police Department, violent crime (including homicide, sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault) fell by 6.9% in the first quarter of 2014, compared with the same period in 2013. Property crime (including burglary, larceny, auto theft, theft from motor vehicle and arson) dropped by 11.1%.
 
 
THE CYCLE, 4/10/14, 5:31 PM ET
Time for politicians to get on board with pot
 
A study looking at the legalization of medical marijuana nationwide, published late last month in the journal PLOS ONE, found that the trend holds: Not only does medical marijuana legalization not correlate with an uptick in crime, researchers from the University of Texas at Dallas argue it may actually reduce it.
 
Using statistics from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report and controlling for variables like the unemployment and poverty rates; per capita income; age of residents; proportion of residents with college degree; number of police officers and prisoners; and even beer consumption, researchers analyzed data from all 50 states between 1990 and 2006. (California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana in 1996; in the decade that followed, 10 states followed suit. Today that number is up to 20 states, plus the District of Columbia.) They wrote: 
 
“The central finding gleaned from the present study was that MML (medical marijuana legalization) is not predictive of higher crime rates and may be related to reductions in rates of homicide and assault. Interestingly, robbery and burglary rates were unaffected by medicinal marijuana legislation, which runs counter to the claim that dispensaries and grow houses lead to an increase in victimization due to the opportunity structures linked to the amount of drugs and cash that are present.”
 
The study drew a link between marijuana and alcohol use, surmising that the legalization of pot could cause the number of alcohol-fueled crimes to decline.
 
“While it is important to remain cautious when interpreting these findings as evidence that MML reduces crime, these results do fall in line with recent evidence and they conform to the longstanding notion that marijuana legalization may lead to a reduction in alcohol use due to individuals substituting marijuana for alcohol. Given the relationship between alcohol and violent crime, it may turn out that substituting marijuana for alcohol leads to minor reductions in violent crimes that can be detected at the state level.”
 
The pro-legalization group Norml cited a 2002 study by David Boyum and Mark Kleiman arguing that regulating marijuana on the same terms as alcohol “would tend to reduce crime.”
 

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We all know Spider man loves Mary Jane ; )

Category: Fun | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder

spidey-loves-maryjane


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