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Category: Fun | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder


Illinois House moves toward decriminalizing marijuana possession

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder

Getting caught with a small amount of marijuana would result in a fine instead of arrest under a measure the Illinois House approved Thursday.
Low-level cannabis possession would go from a crime with fines of up to $2,500 and up to a year in jail to be more like a traffic ticket: no court time and a fine of up to $125. The measure would apply to people caught with 15 grams or less, the equivalent of about 25 cigarette-size joints.
Sponsoring Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago, said the measure wouldn't override laws in cities like Chicago that already have fines in place for marijuana possession but is aimed at creating a uniform penalty throughout the state and eliminating the option for police to arrest people carrying small amounts of pot.
"We currently have a patchwork of local ordinances where there is the possibility of getting a ticket but not a given that you'll get a ticket, so it's an open question where you go whether you're going to get arrested or get a ticket," Cassidy said. "That creates a system whereby it depends on where you live, and what you look like, and unfortunately more often than not, it is folks who are black and brown who are being arrested, who are being pulled off the streets, pulled away from their jobs and their families and put into our jails and prisons."
The House bill comes days after Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez announced her office would stop prosecuting low-level marijuana possession cases for people with fewer than three arrests or citations. It also follows a measure enacted by Chicago in 2012 that allowed police to issue tickets of $250 to $500 for someone caught with 15 grams or less of marijuana.
he proposal, sent to the Senate on a 62-53 vote, drew support from both Republican and Democratic lawmakers. Republican Rep. Ron Sandack of Downers Grove said the legislation fits in with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's goal of reducing the number of adults and juveniles sent to jail by 25 percent over 10 years.
"I think police have been bogged down with petty possession crimes," Sandack said. "I think courts have been bogged down with petty possession crimes. These people, they're not dealers. They have no intent to sell."


Six Republicans Resubmit Bill To Allow States To Legalize Marijuana

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder

gop marijuana conservatives rand paul bryan fischerSix Republican members of Congress just reintroduced the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act, previously submitted in 2013, which would amend the federal Controlled Substances Act by permitting states to develop their own marijuana policies without fear of federal prosecution. Four states have already legalized recreational use of marijuana for adults, while twenty-three states, D.C., and Guam allow some form of medical marijuana access. According to the think tank Third Way, 67% of Americans support Congress passing a bill that respects states developing their own marijuana policy.

“There are few principles more fundamental to the Republican Party than states’ rights. Allowing states to decide their own marijuana policy both fits with party ideology and makes much more sense than the laws currently on the books,” said Maj. Neill Franklin (Ret.), executive director forLaw Enforcement Against Prohibition, a group of cops and other criminal justice professionals opposed to the drug war. “But until Congress decides to change the law all assurances of non-intervention from the federal government may prove meaningless.”

Many states considering new marijuana laws have been hesitant because doing so may violate federal law, and because the Drug Enforcement Administration has said it will act independently of federal mandates that limit federal interaction with state marijuana laws. The Department of Justice released a memo in August 2013 stating they would no longer go after states that decided to legalize marijuana, so long as businesses complied with common sense guidelines such as not selling marijuana to children and not being involved in organized criminal activity. The recently passed federal “cromnibus” spending bill also prohibits the DOJ from undermining states’ medical marijuana policies. Drug Enforcement Administrator Michele Leonhart has authorized her agency to ignore these mandates. Leonhart will be retiring next month after an official letter of “no confidence” was issued by the House Oversight Committee after hearings on a sex scandal in which DEA agents repeatedly had sex with prostitutes paid for by drug cartels.

LEAP is committed to ending decades of failed policy that have created underground markets and gang violence, fostered corruption and racism, and largely ignored the public health crisis of addiction. The war on drugs has cost more than one trillion dollars, yielded only disastrous outcomes, and ultimately diverted the penal system’s attention away from more important crimes.



Oregon Want $5 Million to Spy on Pot Shops

Category: News | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder

When voters in Oregon agreed last year to banish prohibition and establish a legal framework for a statewide cannabis market, they had no idea that law enforcement was scheming to create a master plan aimed at squeezing pot dollars to spy on the state's suppliers and vendors

It appears as though the same green-eyed monsters that once fought the battle against black market marijuana have decided to wage war against the state’s legal cannabis industry. Reports indicate that the Oregon State Police recently put in a request for a $3.9 million raise in their annual budget to supplement the already $1.3 million the state approved earlier this year, so that cops could keep an eye on legal weed.

Although state police officials have refused to comment on the reasoning behind their proposed $5 million budget to act as the state’s Bud Brother, there is speculation that these demands stem from an outcry by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, who have begged for the creation of “peace officers” to act as pot watchdogs similar to excise cops in the world of booze. Essentially, the state is asking for a department to be created to ensure weed is not being sold to minors and that businesses are paying their taxes. 

There are some concerns, however, that establishing a supervisional program could potentially set the state’s legal home-growers up for unexpected shakedowns.

“You could potentially have a marijuana enforcement agent knocking on someone’s door to look at a home grow,” Senator Floyd Prozanski, who is part of the Senate Committee overseeing the cannabis trade, told Willamette Week. “I don’t think anyone on the committee would want them to have that broad of power.”

Nobody is trying to bust residents for growing five plants instead of four, said OLCC spokesman Tom Towslee, who says the commission is fine with limiting the authority of the pot police strictly to licensed facilities. “We have no conflict with the committee,” he said.

Although the state police is convinced that it will cost several million dollars more than what they have already been allotted to inspect retail pot shops for compliance issues, this does not necessarily mean they will be approved. In fact, the OLCC claims they only foresee the need for a special officer stationed in their office to field calls from state police when running information on individuals caught in possession of large amounts of marijuana. Otherwise, there is not much else to support the need for such a hefty increase to the budget.

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