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What Are The Active Ingredients In Medical Marijuana?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
active-ingredients-in-mmjThe medicinal and psychoactive effects that we associate with marijuana are caused by unique chemical structures called cannabinoids found in the actual plant. To date, there have been 86 cannabinoids identified in nature and others have been synthesized chemically. The major psychoactive ingredient in marijuana is delta-g-tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly referred to as THC (although other naming systems refer to it confusingly as delta-t-THC). Other cannabinoids, in addition to THC, have medicinal or psychoactive elements.
 
Cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), cannabavarin (THCV), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabichromene (CBC), delta-8-THC, cannabicyclol (CBL), cannabitriol (CBT), and cannabielsoin are among the many different naturally-occurring cannabinoids. Most are known to have psychoactive and/or pharmacological properties just like many other synthetic cannabinoid analogs.
 
Because of delta-9-THC’s psychoactive nature in marijuana, it is regularly used to measure the herb’s potency. THC typically occurs in concentrations of less than 0.5% for inactive hemp, 2 to 3% for marijuana leaf, and 4 to 20% for higher-grade marijuana. In seedless buds, known as sinsemilla, you’ll find the highest concentrations of THC in the plant at 10 to 20% or more. Higher concentrations of THC can be found in extracts, tonics, and hashish (concentrated cannabis resin). Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about marijuana strains.
 
Oral doses of THC range from 2.5 to 20 milligrams for therapeutic purposes. A regular joint (1 gram of 2.5% leaf or 0.5 grams of 5% higher-grade leaf) usually has 25 milligrams of THC. Over half of this amount is generally destroyed by combustion or is lost in side-stream smoke. Around 15 to 50% of the THC in a typical marijuana joint actually gets to the bloodstream, making the actual inhaled dose closer to 3 to 12 milligrams.
 
THC will not naturally occur in its active form in the cannabis plant. Instead, it occurs in an acidic form called tetrahydrocannabinolic acid or THC acid (THCA). When burned in a cigarette or heated in cooking, the THCA is rapidly converted to active THC in a heat-propelled reaction called decarboxylation. Unlike THC, we have very little knowledge of THCA. We do know that it is not psychoactive, but it has been discovered to have immune-modulatory properties akin to other cannabinoids.
 
Eating marijuana raw will not produce any strong psychoactive effects because the THCA is essentially inactive. As marijuana ages, however, some of the THCA undergoes decarboxylation. The marijuana resin in hashish usually contains very high levels of active THC.
 
CBD is the next most common cannabinoid and is very prevalent in hemp varieties of cannabis. CBD actually lacks any noticeable psychoactive affects and does not really intereact with the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Despite that, plenty of evidence is starting to show that CBD has valuable medicinal properties. It works in concert with THC, augmenting its medical effects and moderating its psychoactive effects. Some researched think that CBD has anti-psychotic properties which tend to reduce anxiety and panic reactions to THC. It is also considered to improve wakefulness and to supplement THC’s activity against pain and spasticity. Pretreatment with CBD in mice nearly tripled the levels of THC in their brains which is an indication that it can increase the action and effectiveness of other drugs. Cannabinoids definitely work together to provide the desired effect.
 
If taken by itself, CBD has anti-inflammatory anti-anxiety, anti-epileptic, sedative, and neuro-protective properties. It’s also quite a powerful anti-oxidant and can protect against chemical damage due to oxidation. Lab and animal tests have suggested that CBD could even protect against the incurrence of the following diseases: diabetes; certain types of cancer; rheumatoid arthritis; brain and nerve damage as a result of a stroke; alcoholism; Huntington’s disease; and even prion infections like “Mad Cow.” Other evidence suggests that CBD is biphasic, meaning that its effectiveness diminishes if the does is too high or too low.
 
CBD is one of the major ingredients in Sativex, the cannabis spray the UK-based GW Pharmaceuticals is developing. The spray contains equal parts CBD and THC and has been approved for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis in Canada. GW is at the forefront of CBD research and has plans to study its effectiveness in treating arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, psychotic disorders, and epilepsy.
 
CBD and THC acid (THCA) are produced simultaneously. In the marijuana plant, a cannabinoid called cannabigerolic acid is the precursor for both CBD and THCA. Each cannabinoid is produced by a different enzyme that acts on cannabigerolic acid. Seeing as how CBD and THCA come from the same precursor, it’s hard to find plants that have high level of both. Hemp plants tend to lack the enzyme that produces THCA and, so, CBD is often very prevalent. Unfortunately, most marijuana that’s sold to consumers has significantly lower levels of CBD because growers tend to selectively breed out the CBD enzyme to produce more THC. Now that we know so much about the benefits of CBD, you might start seeing plants with higher levels of CBD in the future.
 

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Agent Orange - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder

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Agent Orange - Hybrid

The Agent Orange strain of marijuana is a three way cross between Space Queen, Jack's Cleaner and Orange Velvet Skunk that delivers its wonders within just 55 and 65 days when cultivated indoors. AO is a hybrid mix of Sativa and Indica the develops very heavy buds, coated with white crystals and blazing orange hairs. It smells like stinky cheese mixed with a bit of diesel fuel and various spices. The taste is likewise spicy, yet sweet and full. The buzz is trippy; mixing feelings of calming body stones with energetic mental lucidity.


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Extravaganja Pushing People Towards Cannabis Acceptance

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
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For those who are unfamiliar with the Extravaganja event, it is held in order to bring political activists and causal smokers together in order to promote cannabis acceptance. It is organized by the UMass Cannabis Reform Coalition, which happens to be the oldest student run drug reform group in the entire country. The people who put Extravaganja made the purpose of the event to bring cannabis users together with those in political positions of power, in order to show the politicians that cannabis users spread across many generations and that accepting the plant is definitely the best option.
 
The president of the UMass Cannabis Reform Coalition, Sebastian Vivas, takes a full year to plan this event. He says that the group works closely with the city officials, as well as the police department in order to put on the safest gathering possible. Vivas had nothing but good things to say about working with these people, stating that "they have been just great to work with. I love being in a place where they aren't afraid to hold such a controversial event in the center of town."
 
Vivas also compared the Extravanganja event to the Blarney Blowout, a similar kind of event that focuses on alcohol instead of weed. While the Blowout goes well for the bars that officially host the event, the rest of the student population seems to go out, get completely obliterated drunk, and cause extreme issues with police personnel and citizens alike. Like most stoners, Vivas states that thousands of people getting drunk stands a much higher chance of causing accidents as compared to thousands of people smoking weed. Events like the Blarney Blowout can be fun if monitored but mostly, the thousands of drunk college age kids cause riots, accidents, and serious damage with must be fixed with tax payer money.
 
Colorado's recent marijuana legalization has Reuters predicting that there will be at least $98 million in tax revenue by the end of this year from official marijuana sales. This number is 40% higher then what officials originally predicted the state would make. This money will be used to help school programs, fix roads, and improve other aspects of the community as well. Imagine all of that money being spent on people in the community, rather then the people having to pay taxes in order to keep nonviolent offenders in jail. With those people released and no new arrests for nonviolent marijuana crimes being made, plus the revenue from sales, it's hard to come up with a logical explanation as to why more states haven't begun to take a second look at their marijuana laws.

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Ghost OG Nugs

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, April, 15th 2014 by THCFinder

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Cannabis Causes Stink In Colorado

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, April, 15th 2014 by THCFinder
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Stoners love the smell of their marijuana. Some people love it so much that they have actually created perfumes that resemble the smell of the flowers. However, the perfumes differ from the traditional stink of marijuana, which usually resembles a skunk. This bittersweet aroma is getting people really upset, especially those who don't want to smell it. There are even some businesses, such as a small barber shop in Colorado, who are deciding to turn away customers who carry the smell of cannabis with them.
 
Hugo Corral is the owner of the barber shop and he's gone as far as to hang a sign in the window of his shop that says "Please do not come in if you smell like marijuana, there are families here who don't want to smell it. This is a business, not your home". Corral went on to tell the Guardian Daily that he feels that people who smell like weed are disrespectful, especially to the families that come in to the shop. Some customers have complained that the smell can get so bad that it seems as if someone is smoking right in the chair while they're getting a trim.
 
This situation has definitely begun to cause waves in the community, with Corral being categorized as discriminatory but because smelling like marijuana doesn't fall under race, sex, religion, or sexual orientation, and other constitutionally protected categories, those who say they feel discriminated against have almost no ground to stand on. Extremely unfortunate, seeing as how apparently this business was making money off of these weed smelling smokers and the plan to ban them may eventually effect business.
 
If people smell like marijuana, there's really no reason to bar them from entering places (unless that place is perhaps a preschool). While some people claim that the smell is "offensive" and "rude", the same could be argued for the person who is blowing out a lungful of cigarette smoke while simultaneously pushing open the door to a business. Not everybody smokes cigarettes and it can be offensive to those who don't smoke when someone passes by them, reeking like tobacco. The same could be said for alcohol. If someone is drinking and then goes to a store, the smell of booze carries with them. Alcohol could also absolutely be considered an offensive smell. While not everyone wants to smell it, it seems like these rabble-rousers only have a nose for marijuana and not the other offensive smells that people can carry with them.

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7 ounce Cross Joint

Category: Fun | Posted on Tue, April, 15th 2014 by THCFinder

7-ounce-cross-joint


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