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How To Grow The OG Kush Marijuana Strain Indoors

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, July, 31st 2014 by THCFinder

OG Kush General

It’s common to hear the term “Kush” in a conversation about weed. In its base form, Kush is a pure indica strain, but OG Kush is much more of a hybrid than pure-breed. OG Kush marijuana seeds are capable of producing high-quality gardens with high-quality bud. They also have plenty of uses in the medicinal world.

OG Kush Smoking Effects

When we think of Kush, it’s common to think of a harsh smoke that really deadens the senses. This is because Kush is a pure indica strain. OG Kush, on the other hand, produces the exact opposite effect. It is able to provide you with an immediate boost of energy that makes it perfect for social engagements. It’s certainly not ideal if you are trying to get to sleep. The reason for all this is because of the increased incidence of THC on the plant. Although it is an indica-dominant hybrid, the amount of THC negates a lot of the heavy effects you’d associate with traditional Kush varieties. The distinct citrusy, sour tastes and aromas work delightfully in concert with your improved mood and energy level. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana.

OG Kush Plant Features

Perhaps the single most important factor of the OG Kush plant is its ability to produce large amounts of dense buds. These buds are considerably easy to harvest, which is good for novice growers who don’t know much about harvesting. The plants themselves attain average heights of around 40 to 60 inches, although they are generally on the lower end of that spectrum.

OG Kush marijuana seeds will produce plants that take about 9 weeks to flower. The plants will exude a distinct piney aroma that will have your grow room smelling like a forest. The yields are relatively low at around 16 ounces per 10 square feet, but the 21% THC content more than makes up for it. With the OG Kush strain, you can also get seeds that are feminized and/or autoflowering to make the growing process easier for you.

OG Kush Medicinal Uses

As noted previously, the OG Kush strain has a lot of indications for medicinal use. It can help with everything from depression to appetite loss. Patients on chemotherapy have used OG Kush to lessen nausea associated with the procedures. Anorexia can also be mitigated with the use of OG Kush. Glaucoma patients have seen relief with the use of OG Kush. The strain can also be used as a general pain reliever.

If you want to start growing OG Kush, download my free grow guide and order some marijuana seeds. All top quality marijuana seeds are available in my marijuana seed shop. We ship seeds to the US, CA and many other countries. For any growing related question please visit the marijuana support page.


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Hell Walker OG Weed - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, July, 31st 2014 by THCFinder

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How the Federal Government Slows Marijuana Research

Category: News | Posted on Thu, July, 31st 2014 by THCFinder
fed-gov-slows-down-marijuana-research
Politicians who don’t want to take a clear position on marijuana legalization often say more research is needed on the effects of consuming the drug. Hillary Clinton called for more research just last month on CNN.
 
While existing scientific evidence shows that marijuana is less addictive and harmful than alcohol and tobacco, more research would be welcome and useful to the country. But what most politicians don’t acknowledge is that the federal government has made it incredibly hard to perform this research. Researchers have to go through a cumbersome process to obtain approval from multiple federal agencies before they are allowed to obtain and study the drug. Often their requests are denied and some researchers have had to sue the government before their projects were cleared.
 
In addition to the Food and Drug Administration, which has to approve all clinical trials, researchers studying marijuana also have to obtain approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration and the National Institute on Drug Abuse, which controls the country’s only legal source for research-grade marijuana. Independent researchers who are not funded by the National Institutes of Health also have to obtain approval from a Department of Health and Human Services scientific review panel.
 
The drug abuse institute says that it has funded and provided marijuana to researchers looking into the therapeutic benefits of the various chemicals found in the plant, and that it had 28 active grants in this area as of January. But it is far less charitable about providing marijuana to researchers who are independently funded. It has agreed to provide the drug to just 16 such projects since 1999.
 
One researcher, Lyle E. Craker a professor at the University of Massachusetts, grew so frustrated with the delays in getting access to marijuana that he sought to grow his own plants. But the Drug Enforcement Administration refused to grant him a license and a federal appeals court ruled in favor of the D.E.A. last year.
 
A big part of the problem is that marijuana is listed in the restrictive Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act along with much more dangerous drugs such as heroin and LSD. The law says Schedule I drugs have “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.” It is no wonder then that the American College of Physicians said in 2008 that marijuana’s inclusion in Schedule I “raises significant concerns for researchers, physicians, and patients” and urged “an evidence-based review of marijuana’s status as a Schedule I controlled substance to determine whether it should be reclassified.”
 

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Can you fail a drug test because of secondhand marijuana smoke?

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, July, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
failed-drug-test-2nd-hand-smoke
Josh Gordon is appealing his failed drug test, and apparently has a pretty good case to stand on when he meets with Roger Goodell on Friday. He is not abandoning his contention that the trace amounts of THC picked up in his system were caused by secondhand smoke. That provoked an important debate in the SB Nation newsroom: can you really fail a drug test from secondhand smoke?
 
David Fucillo of SB Nation and Niners Nation (pictured below) says that you can indeed fail a drug test because of secondhand smoke because it happened to him.
 
He later revealed that it was a hair follicle test, which does have a greater level of sensitivity. So is he onto something here?
 
One problem with drug testing for marijuana is the wide variety of variables, ranging from the potency of the weed to the level of use by the testing subject.
 
The likelihood of testing positive for THC from secondhand smoke is slim. Message boards around the Internet agree that you'd have to be in a small, unventilated space with lots of smoke, a clambake if you will, to have enough THC in your system to flunk a test.
 

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New York Times To Drug Test Employees Despite Supporting Marijuana Legalization

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, July, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
nytimes-drug-testing-employeesThe media world was rocked this weekend when the New York Times Editorial Board came out in support of marijuana legalization. The New York Times is in the midst of releasing a six part series dedicated to marijuana legalization. The endorsement was welcomed by marijuana activists around the world, and got the attention of just about every media outlet on the planet by the end of the weekend.
 
While the endorsement is very much appreciated, I still find it troubling that the New York Times plans to continue to drug test its employees. Every drug test that is paid for by the New York Times financially supports companies who have led the fight to keep marijuana illegal, in addition to penalyzing prospective employees for marijuana use. Per the Huffington Post:
 
But the editorial board’s new stance doesn’t mean incoming Times employees can partake. As Gawker recently noted, the Times is one of several big media companies that require prospective hires to take a drug test. A Times spokeswoman told HuffPost that the paper’s policy for drug testing hasn’t changed, despite the editorial board’s decision.
 
“Our corporate policy on this issue reflects current law,” the spokeswoman said. “We aren’t going to get into details beyond that.”
 
Arbitrary drug testing is wrong. People should be hired based on their skill set, not on the purity of their urine. An impairment based drug testing system is much better, and is more accurate. A drug test shows that someone has consumed marijuana within the last 30 days, but does not indicate if that person was under the influence at work, or even if they are a bad worker. I have had marijuana in my system consistently for over two decades, and I’ve always been an exceptional employee, and I know I’m not alone.
 

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The federal governments incredibly poor, misleading argument for marijuana prohibition

Category: News | Posted on Wed, July, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-prohibitionThe New York Times editorial board is making news with a week-long series advocating for the full legalization of marijuana in the United States. In response, the White House's Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) published a blog post Monday purporting to lay out the federal government's case against marijuana reform.
 
That case, as it turns out, it surprisingly weak. It's built on half-truths and radically decontextualized facts, curated from social science research that is otherwise quite solid. I've gone through the ONDCP's arguments, and the research behind them, below.
 
The irony here is that with the coming wave of deregulation and legalization, we really do need a sane national discussion of the costs and benefits of widespread marijuana use. But the ONDCP's ideological insistence on prohibition prevents them from taking part in that conversation.
 
Here's what they have to say:
 
Marijuana use affects the developing brain. A recent study in Brain reveals impairment of the development of structures in some regions of the brain following prolonged marijuana use that began in adolescence or young adulthood.
 
The same is true for alcohol and tobacco. This is a great argument for restricting young peoples' access to the drugs (as Washington and Colorado have done with marijuana), but a poor one for banning it completely.
 
Moreover, the study cited was of a group of 59 individuals who had been heavy marijuana smokers for 16 years, and who had smoked an average of 4.5 joints every single day over that period.
 
This is far outside the realm of normal, moderate use. A recent Colorado Department of Revenue report found, for instance, that the majority of users in that state smoked five or fewer times per month. Again, what we have is not an argument against marijuana use, but an argument against overdoing it.
 

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