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Australian Senator Says Denying Medical Marijuana Is "Cruel"

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, June, 24th 2014 by THCFinder
aussie-senator-denying-mj-is-wrongAustralia isn't exactly the head of the marijuana community... But we can't forget about our pothead friends down under! This somewhat isolated continent is working just as hard on their marijuana reform as the rest of the world. And they're definitely making progress, now that their politicians are beginning to see that marijuana isn't a problem... But maybe denying people the right to smoke it is. Patients especially need the healing powers of this plant and those in positions of political influence need to know about it the most!
 
The Senator, Richard di Natale, is a doctor as well. He says that the evidence is more then clear that cannabis can be extremely effective against fighting specific illnesses. He stated in an interview with Nine Network that he "just thinks it's cruel to deny people the option just because there's some stigma associated with it." The negative stigma associated with marijuana doesn't even really have ground to stand on anymore, considering that the arguments against it were that it made women promiscuous and caused insanity. Both of those have been disproven. Not to mention the false bottomed argument that marijuana is a gateway drug, a theory that got booted out of the door years ago.
 
Senator Natale went on in the interview to say, "We're going to push to try and get people on all sides of politics to back this reform. The science and the evidence is very, very clear." In addition, the co-convener of the recently re-instated Parliamentary Group on Drug Policy and Law Reform Sharman Stone gave an amazing quote, saying "As a compassionate society, we must join other nations in allowing the regulated use of medical cannabis". The moves that Australia is making are so positive and patient-orientated, I can't help but give them a virtual round of applause.
 
Denying patients a natural, non habit forming medicine is absolutely cruel. Humans are designed to help others of their species, not watch them decay and die, while simultaneously suffering through something like cancer and chemotherapy. The medicines that are given to patients that are suffering are sometimes worse then the affliction itself. Marijuana has no side effects, is relatively cheap (compared to chemo therapy, RSO is basically free when you really think about the medical costs of the aforementioned procedure), and can be produced far faster then man made garbage. Marijuana is not a problem, it is a cure.

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Sour Power - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder

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Philadelphia City Council Votes To Decriminalize Marijuana

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder
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The domino effect is starting to sweep the east coast. Not even... It seems as if every state on the colder coast is working on marijuana reform. While those in California have been happy that they've gotten so far ahead, east coasters get things done... Fast. There's no time to waste when there's laws to be changed! Philadelphia is hopping on that train. Last week, their city council voted to decriminalize possession of up to an ounce. Meaning that if you get caught with that amount, you'll get a $25 ticket.
 
While the plant will remain illegal, this will allow people to get away with the more minor infractions. The absolutely ridiculousness of the laws pertaining to marijuana get people locked up for years, sometimes their entire lives. A lot of these people don't even commit violent crimes, they're just people who enjoy lighting a plant on fire and inhaling the smoke. The bill correctly addresses the problem of arresting people for minor amounts of bud, stating that such infractions "increases the number of people with life changing criminal records". The vote at the city council passed 13-3 in Philadelphia last Thursday.
 
Police in Philly will still be able to arrest those who are caught with less then one ounce, so it's important to remember that you still need to be polite to the cops. The nicer you are to them, the less chance you have of getting a ticket... Or worse. While you still might be cuffed for toking or carrying bud in public, this is definitely a step in the right direction for cannabis on the east coast. As of right now, Philly, New York, Florida, and Ohio have medical marijuana bills at some point in the voting process. Let's hope that these measures pass and patients can get the medicine that they need without having to worry about federal consequences.

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Start your Week off Right with some Fine Green Cannabis

Category: Celebrities | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder

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The Disaster Of CBD-Only Medical Marijuana Legislation

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder
cbd-only-extract-oilSince the premiere of Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s documentary “Weed” back in August, the general public has quickly come to understand the miraculous healing power of cannabidiol, or CBD.  The political perception of medical marijuana changed forever when parents saw little Charlotte Figi, the girl with intractable epilepsy, go from hundreds of seizures a week to just one or two, thanks to CBD treatments.
 
But that change in perception isn’t a good one.  For now there are two types of medical marijuana – CBD-Only and “euphoric marijuana”, as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie calls medical marijuana that contains THC.  Just as “We’re Patients, Not Criminals” cast non-patients as criminals, the lobbying for these new CBD-Only laws relies heavily on pointing out that CBD is a “medicine that doesn’t get you high”, which casts THC at best as a medicine with an undesirable side effect and at worst as not a medicine but a drug of abuse.
 
This is a disaster both politically and medically; let’s begin with the former.  Politically, whole plant medical marijuana (the kind with THC in it) began in 1996 in California and from that point, it took eleven years before there were a dozen whole plant medical marijuana states in America.  CBD-Only medical marijuana began in March in Utah and from that point, it’s taken only four months to put us on the brink of a dozen CBD-Only medical marijuana states.
 
Also consider that of those first dozen whole plant states, eight of them were passed by citizen ballot initiative.  All twelve of the CBD-Only laws were passed by state legislatures, often by unanimous or near-unanimous votes.  Every legislature that has taken up the issue of CBD-Only medical marijuana has seen the legislation fly through the committees and both chambers (except Georgia, and that state was only derailed by some parliamentary shenanigans by one legislator).  Take North Carolina this week as an example.
 
On Tuesday, a committee of the North Carolina House of Representatives cancelled a meeting to discuss a CBD-Only bill.  No rescheduled date for the meeting was announced.  Local newspapers on Wednesday posted headlines that the bill’s passage was unlikely.  The Senate wasn’t likely to pass the bill in this short session that ends next week.  There would be no good reason for the House to move forward with the bill.
 
But on Wednesday afternoon, the meeting was suddenly rescheduled and the CBD-Only bill passed unanimously.  This morning (Thursday) the bill was heard by a second committee and passed immediately.  This afternoon it was heard and amended on the House floor where it passed 111-2.  It now awaits passage by the state Senate.
 
By the end of this week, it seems North Carolina could become the 12th CBD-Only state, joining Alabama, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri (awaiting governor’s signature), New York (governor’s executive order), South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.  Why are legislators so fast to pass these CBD-Only bills?  It’s fair to assume politicians are moved by the plight of epileptic children.  With CBD-Only, there’s no downside of being the guy or gal who voted for legalizing something that “gets you high”.  But even so, how do these bills move so fast and garner little to no opposition?
 
Because CBD-Only bills are political cover.  Voting for the CBD-Only bill allows the politicians to say they’re sympathetic to the plight of sick people and want to help patients get any medicine that will ease their suffering.  But they can also still play the “tough on drugs” game and maintain their support from law enforcement and prison lobbies.  Their vote garners headlines that a politician formerly considered “anti-medical marijuana” has “changed his mind” or “altered her stance” on medical marijuana.  Best of all, it gets the sick kids and their parents out of the legislative galleries and off the evening news.  For the politicians in these conservative states, it makes the medical marijuana issue go away, or at least puts the remaining advocates in the “we want the marijuana that gets you high” frame where they are more easily dismissed.
 
Medically, the CBD-Only laws are also a disaster.  Cannabidiol is just one constituent of cannabis and by itself, it doesn’t work as well as it does with the rest of the plant.  Dr. Raphael Machoulem, the Israeli researcher who discovered THC (the cannabinoid that “gets you high”), called it “the entourage effect”, the concept of many cannabinoids and other constituents working in concert, synergistically.  To make an overly-simple analogy, it’s as if we discovered oranges have vitamin C in them, but banned oranges completely and only allowed people with scurvy to eat vitamin C pills.  Yes, those pills can help you if you’re vitamin deficient, but any nutritionist will tell you eating the whole orange will not only allow your body to absorb the vitamin C better, the fiber from the orange is also good for your body, and oranges taste delicious, which makes you a little happier.  Plus, if oranges are in your diet, you’re not going to get scurvy in the first place.
 
The authors of these CBD-Only bills aren’t writing them for optimal medical efficacy, however, they’re writing them for political cover.  The parents treating their children in Colorado with CBD oil will tell you that it takes quite a bit of tinkering with the ratio of CBD to THC in the oil to find what works best for their child’s type of seizures.  Some of these kids need a higher dose of THC.  But the legislators write the laws mostly to ensure that the THC “that gets you high” is nearly non-existent.
 
The North Carolina law, for instance, mandates that the oil contains at least 10 percent CBD and less than 0.3 percent THC.  That’s a CBD:THC ratio of at least 34:1.  For comparison, an article by Pure Analytics, a California cannabis testing lab, discusses the high-CBD varietals most in demand by patients are “strains with CBD:THC ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 20:1.”  The article explains how a breeding experiment with males and females with 2:1 ratios produced 20:1 ratio plants about one-fourth of the time.  It also describes a strain called “ACDC” that “consistently exhibited 16-20% CBD and 0.5-1% THC by weight.”  That’s one variety with a range of 16:1 to 40:1.  But you must only use the ones that are 34:1 or higher.
 

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Death Star

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder

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Death Star - Indica

Sour Diesel cross with Sensi Star, Death Star's effects are a building pressure in the eyes and around the back of the head and temples to start off, with an increase in heart rate and some perspiration happening at times. The body started buzzing early on and this keeps up throughout the experience, though it turns to more of a warming feeling as it goes on.


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