Search:
Login:
OR

Marijuana Blog

Private Reserve OG - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, September, 9th 2014 by THCFinder

private-reserve-og-indica

pr-og-2

pr-og-3

pr-og-3

Private Reserve OG - Indica

Private Reserve OG is also known as OG #18. The body high of this strain reduces pain and muscles spasms, and is favored by many patients that have conditions like Multiple Sclerosis or chronic pain. This strain has an intense couch lock effect and is a great for sleep.


Comments

The N.F.L.s Absurd Marijuana Policy

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, September, 9th 2014 by THCFinder
nfl-mj-policy
LOS ANGELES — VIRTUALLY every single player in the N.F.L. has a certifiable need for medical marijuana.
 
The game we celebrate creates a life of daily pain for those who play it. Some players choose marijuana to manage this pain, which allows them to perform at a high level without sacrificing their bodies or their minds.
 
I medicated with marijuana for most of my career as a tight end from 2003 through 2008. And I needed the medication. I broke my tibia, dislocated my shoulder, separated both shoulders, tore my groin off the bone once and my hamstring off the bone twice, broke fingers and ribs, tore my medial collateral ligament, suffered brain trauma, etc. Most players have similar medical charts. And every one of them needs the medicine.
 
Standard pain management in the N.F.L. is pain pills and pregame injections. But not all players favor the pill and needle approach. In my experience, many prefer marijuana. The attitude toward weed in the locker room mirrors the attitude in America at large. It’s not a big deal. Players have been familiar with it since adolescence, and those who use it do so to offset the brutality of the game. The fact that they made it to the N.F.L. at all means that their marijuana use is under control.
 
Had marijuana become a problem for me, it would have been reflected in my job performance, and I would have been cut. I took my job seriously and would not have allowed that to happen. The point is, marijuana and excellence on the playing field are not mutually exclusive.
 
A good example is Josh Gordon, the Cleveland Browns wide receiver who led the league last year with 1,646 receiving yards, despite missing two games for testing positive for codeine (for a strep throat, he said). He was suspended again late last month for the entire season after testing positive for marijuana. (At least five others were also suspended last year and this year for marijuana, according to the magazine Mother Jones.)
 
Most players are tested once a year under the N.F.L.’s substance abuse policy, between April 20 and Aug. 9. But players who test positive for a banned drug are placed in the league’s substance abuse program, where the testing is more frequent. It is in this probationary program that players tend to falter.
 
Gordon had marijuana in his system. He broke the rules. I understand that. But this is a rule that absurdly equates marijuana with opiates, opioids and PCP. The N.F.L.’s threshold for disciplinary action for marijuana is 10 times higher than the one used by the International Olympic Committee.
 

Comments

Agent Orange Weed - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, September, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

agent-orange-weed

agent-orange-weed-1 agent-orange-weed-3 agent-orange-weed-2

Agent Orange - Hybrid

The Agent Orange strain of marijuana is a three way cross between Space Queen, Jack's Cleaner and Orange Velvet Skunk that delivers its wonders within just 55 and 65 days when cultivated indoors. AO is a hybrid mix of Sativa and Indica the develops very heavy buds, coated with white crystals and blazing orange hairs. It smells like stinky cheese mixed with a bit of diesel fuel and various spices. The taste is likewise spicy, yet sweet and full. The buzz is trippy; mixing feelings of calming body stones with energetic mental lucidity.


Comments

Study finds marijuana post-trauma benefits

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, September, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
ptsd-mj-benefitsGiving synthetic cannabinoids soon after a person went through a traumatic event can prevent -- in rats -- post-traumatic stress disorder-like symptoms caused by the trauma and by reminders of it. This was discovered by Nachshon Korem and Dr. Irit Akirav of the University of Haifa’s psychology department, which has just been published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology.
 
“The importance of this study is that it contributes to the understanding of the brain basis of the positive effect cannabis has on PTSD. This thus supports the necessity of performing human trials to examine potential ways to prevent the development of PTSD and anxiety disorders in response to a traumatic event,” the researchers said.
 
About nine percent of the population suffer from PTSD; in some groups, such  as Holocaust survivors, combat soldiers, prisoners, victims of assault and citizens in lines of confrontation, the prevalence is even higher. A common phenomenon among those who suffer from trauma is that exposure to a “trauma reminder” -- an event that is not essentially traumatic but evokes the memory of the experience of the traumatic event -- can further heighten the negative effects of the trauma. For example, for a person who has developed PTSD syndromes as a result of “Color Red” sirens (air raid sirens), a trauma reminder can occur following a loud car alarm.
 
In previous studies performed by Akirav, she discovered that the use of cannabinoids within a specific time window after the traumatic event occurred reduces PTSD symptoms in rats. In this current study with doctoral student n Korem, she aimed to examine whether the use of cannabinoids may also moderate the effects of trauma in cases of exposure to trauma reminders. The researchers chose rats because of their great physiological similarity to humans in the way they respond to stressful and traumatic events.
 
During the first half of the experiment, the rats underwent the traumatic event of getting an electric shock and were exposed to trauma reminders on the third and fifth days of the trial. After the event, and within the time window found in earlier studies, some of the rats were injected with a cannabinoid substance. The rats then went through extinction procedures for trauma (a conditional psychological procedure similar to exposure therapy in humans, the purpose of which is to cope with PTSD symptoms).
 
It became clear that the rats that were injected with the cannabinoid substance showed no PTSD symptoms such as impaired extinction learning, increased startle response, changes in sensitivity to pain and impaired plasticity in the brain’s reward center (the nucleus accumbens), compared to those not injected with the drug. The researchers added that the rats injected with the drug showed better results compared to rats who received the antidepressant drug sertraline, a substance used with limited success in reducing PTSD symptoms.
 
In fact, for some of the symptoms, the rats that were injected with the drug showed similar behavior to rats exposed to trauma but that were not exposed to trauma reminders. In other words, cannabis made the effects of trauma reminders “disappear.”
 

Comments

The Real reason I didn't text back = )

Category: Fun | Posted on Mon, September, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

the-real-reason-i-didnt-text-back


Comments

Texas Teen No Longer Facing Life In Prison For Cannabis Brownies

Category: News | Posted on Mon, September, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
texas-teen-and-marijuana-browniesTexas has very, very harsh cannabis laws. A case that demonstrates that is the case of Jacob Lavoro, who is 19 years old. Jacob Lavoro was caught with cannabis brownies, and the State of Texas was trying to throw the book at him. Because they were brownies, and had flour, sugar, and other ingredients, the weight of the brownies was being considered the weight of the possession with intent to distribute. That all added up to a first degree felony charge, which carries a prison sentence of up to life in prison.
 
Fortunately, that charge was dropped, but unfortunately, another charge was applied. Per Raw Story:
 
The district attorney in Williamson County decided not to pursue the first-degree felony case, and a grand jury indicted Lavoro last week on a second-degree felony charge for possession of THC and a state felony charge for possession of marijuana.
 
“We figured that would be a simpler, more straight-forward case,” said District Attorney Mark Brunner. “We wouldn’t get lost in the weeds of arguing about the adulterants and dilutants, even though the law allows us to make that argument.”
 
The new charge still brings an overly harsh prison sentence if convicted. A second degree felony charge could result in up to 20 years in prison. 20 years is obviously better than life, however, it’s still a huge injustice, and a tremendous waste of tax payer dollars and corrections resources if it happens. A prison bed should be reserved for a person that is a danger to society, not for someone that makes cannabis brownies.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
4.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles,
13.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles ,
15.4 Miles Away | Anaheim,
September 4, 2015 | Category: Fun
September 4, 2015 | Category: Medical Marijuana
September 4, 2015 | Category: Nugs
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2015 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us