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Arizona forum on medical marijuana rules

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 5th 2011 by THCFinder

TUCSON, Ariz. -- The rules have been released.  Now, many Arizonans are ready to operate their own medical marijuana businesses.
 
Monday, Tucsonans interested in starting up a grow operation or dispensary got a chance to see what's involved.
 
Now that Arizona has become the 15th state to enact a medical marijuana law.  People are wondering how the measure will impact them.
 
Monday, a few dozen people got their questions answered at a forum in Tucson hosted by the Arizona Medical Marijuana Association.
 
Just last week the Arizona department of health services released its rules for medical marijuana use and distribution.
 
Among the requirements, patients must get a recommendation from a doctor licensed in Arizona or one who has been treating them for years.
 
Also, applicants who want to operate a dispensary must put down $5,000 with a $1,000 annual renewal fee.
 
"About 92 pages worth of rules, but they look really good, they look like they've done their research as far as making sure everything gets structured right," said Heidi Kay.
 
Applicants will have to first find a location for their dispensary, then make sure it coincides with zoning rules, then fill out a business plan.
 
The medical marijuana association hopes the process is just the beginning of a growing acceptance.
 

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Medical Cannabis Patients Worry About Impact Of Repeal in Montana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 5th 2011 by THCFinder
Medical marijuana patients say they don't think fixes to the state's marijuana initiative ever had a chance.
 
Dennis Gulyas, a medical cannabis patient, says, "I would just like to tell those representatives out there that have decided to go ahead and go against the will of the people, the will of the people will come back to bite you."
 
Tayln Lang, head of the Missoula chapter of the Montana Medical Growers Association, says, "This is the very first voter-sponsored initiative repealed by the legislature. I feel that sets a very dangerous precedent."
 
House Bill 161 would end medical marijuana in Montana July 1. Gulyas says, "On that date I'm not going to be a happy person. I'm going to be a very sad person. Not for myself but for all those people that are even worse conditioned than me. Where are they going to go? What are they going to do? Are they going to be a criminal?"
 
Advocates like Lang say it will have a much broader impact on the state, especially on people who sunk money into starting a cannabis business.
 

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Bad case of the munchies: Man arrested for stealing Krispy Kreme doughnut truck

Category: Odd | Posted on Mon, April, 4th 2011 by THCFinder
A 20-year-old man who has been arrested for possession of marijuana and stealing a Krispy Kreme doughnut truck said he did it because he was 'tired and wanted to have a sleep'.
 
Randall Travis Roberts, from Davenport, Iowa, was arrested on Thursday and charged with grand theft auto and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana.
 
He claims the Class B drug did not belong to him.
 
Police said two vehicles bumped into each other and the drivers thought the mirrors might have been damaged, so they stopped in the 400 block of West Silver Springs Boulevard and called police.
 
At the scene, Roberts officer Leonard Griggs he had stolen the 2011 GMC box truck owned by Gulf Florida Doughnut Distributing in Tampa from a Walmart parking lot in Haines City.
 
Roberts told the officers he had gotten tired of walking and that his feet hurt.
 
He said he saw the truck, with the keys inside, parked behind the Walmart and took it 'because he needed somewhere to sleep'.
 
Inside the truck was 338 boxes of Krispy Kreme doughnuts as well as a plastic bag of marijuana on the floor near the driver's seat.
 
 

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Cannabis that kills pain with no high is possible

Category: News | Posted on Mon, April, 4th 2011 by THCFinder
A new U.S. study has paved the way for cannabis that relieves pain but doesn't get you high.
 
"The psychoactive effects of marijuana is the major issue that limits, across the country, the use of medical marijuana in the treatment of different diseases," said Li Zhang, who headed up the research at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in Bethesda, Maryland.
 
The study, published in the journal Nature Chemical Biology, claims to debunk the long-held belief that the therapeutic and psychoactive effects of pot are mutually exclusive.
 
Tetrahydrocannabinol (TCH) is the key ingredient in marijuana that makes people high, said Zhang. It works by binding to molecular anchors on cells called cannaboid type-1 receptors.
 
It was thought that this process also relieved pain, but Zhang says marijuana has over 400 chemical compounds that provide therapeutic relief for a number of disorders, such as chronic pain, seizures, depression and muscle spasms from multiple sclerosis.
 
These compounds, he says, could target different receptors in the brain. Figuring out what compounds target which receptors is the key to crafting cannabis-based medicine for different disorders, but without the usual side-effects associated with recreational pot smoking.
 
The study found the glycine receptor might be the primary target for pot's painkilling effects. When Zhang's team blocked glycine receptors on mice dosed with cannabis, the animals still felt pain.
 
The next step is to test his theories on different animals using different strains of marijuana. The goal is to find the strain that has the strongest pain-relieving component.
 

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Vermont considers medical marijuana dispensaries

Category: Dispensaries | Posted on Mon, April, 4th 2011 by THCFinder
Lynn, a 40-year-old professional photographer who lives in Burlington, said he believes in marijuana’s medicinal value for those who suffer from chronic pain and he thinks it’s wrong that such people have nowhere legal to buy the relief.
 
“People having to go out and buy it on a corner from someone — it’s not right,” Lynn said. “I see this as an opportunity to run a successful, local, nonprofit business which would provide medical respectability to the current and future patients on the registry. It would open a more honest, serious dialogue about the benefits of cannabis.”
 
Medical marijuana has been legal in Vermont since 2004, for those with qualifying illnesses — including cancer, AIDS and multiple sclerosis — who sign up for the state’s registry. The 2004 law allows patients to grow their own marijuana, but advocates say many find that a daunting task, leaving them with the prospect of making illegal deals for street dope.
 
The state’s medical marijuana registry specifies, “The Marijuana Registry is neither a source for marijuana nor can the Registry provide information to patients on how to obtain marijuana.”
 
The answer, advocates say, is to legalize a small number of medical marijuana dispensaries — nonprofit operations that would grow marijuana and sell it to those on the medical marijuana registry.
 
The bill has the backing of Gov. Peter Shumlin. With a series of restrictions added that are designed to avoid problems seen in other states, it also has the support of Public Safety Commissioner Keith Flynn.
 
Some worry, however, that the dispensaries will become drug havens and the medical marijuana registry will quickly be flooded with those looking for a legal way to smoke pot.
 

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Marijuana legalization bill dies in Olympia

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, April, 4th 2011 by THCFinder
A bill that would legalize marijuana in Washington state - something every state legislator from Seattle, as well as the city’s mayor, city attorney and several City Councilmembers say they support – is officially dead in Olympia.
 
House Bill 1550 didn’t advance out of the relevant committees by Friday evening – a key cutoff date during the 2011 Legislature.
 
The measure, sponsored by Rep. Mary Lou Dickerson, D-Seattle would legalize marijuana, have its sale regulated by the state Liquor Control Board and impose a tax of 15 percent per gram on cannabis. Supporters say it would bring in hundreds of millions of dollars for a state government staring at a deficit of at least $5 billion for the next two years. A contingent of Seattle officials testified for the bill last month.
 
But actually passing a legalized pot bill was always going to be a hard sell. Technically, the measure could be incorporated into a budget bill in the final weeks of the session, but that seems highly unlikely.
A bill in the state Senate that would’ve legalized marijuana died earlier in the session.
 
The Seattle Times editorial board recently said marijuana should be legalized and there’s a chance voters will get a chance to weigh in on the matter soon. Sponsors of a measure that would legalize marijuana use by people 18 and older are collecting signatures to try to get an initiative before the people this fall. To qualify for the November ballot, initiative sponsors need to get the signatures of more than 241,000 registered voters by July 8. Last year a similar effort fell short by about 50,000 signatures.
 

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