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Super Lemon Haze Concentrate

Category: Concentrates | Posted on Tue, September, 24th 2013 by THCFinder

super-lemon-haze-concentrate-wax


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Deny Organ Transplants to Marijuana Users?

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, September, 24th 2013 by THCFinder

organ-transplant-for-mmj-usersWe don't personally think anyone using Cannabis should ever be denied a life saving treatment like an Organ transplant but unfortunately it looks like many others do!

Hi. I'm Art Caplan at the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, and I head the Division of Medical Ethics. Should somebody who smokes marijuana be eligible to get an organ transplant? You might think that this is a silly question, but it isn't. In fact, nearly every transplant center in the United States says that if you are abusing a drug -- alcohol, cocaine, or heroin -- you will not be considered for a transplant. For a long time, marijuana has been listed right beside the rest of those drugs as something that is both addictive and criminal to use. Clearly, we have been shifting our policy in the United States, with many states permitting the use of marijuana for medical purposes. Some states allow recreational use without penalty. However, a number of transplant centers around the United States continue to exclude people who have shown 2 positive tests in a row over a period of months for the use of marijuana.
 
What is the medical reason? It is partly physiological and partly psychological. Marijuana has been shown to damage the liver. It causes problems for people who already have fatty livers. If you need a liver transplant, it may accelerate your need if your liver is already starting to go, and it can damage the new liver. If the livers come from older donors, which they often do, there is some evidence that marijuana use can weaken the ability of the liver to function well. In terms of psychology, there is a fear that if you smoke a lot of marijuana you won't be able to be compliant with the post-transplant regimen. You won't take your drugs properly, you won't be able to follow instructions well, and your memory itself may be impaired. I am not going to say that there is a huge amount of evidence for that particular worry, but it is a worry that transplant teams talk about, that a heavy marijuana user may be someone who isn't likely to be able to comply well post-transplant.
 
I said that the test for marijuana exclusion for transplant is 2 positive tests in a row over a couple of months. That doesn't mean that you are a heavy user. You might just be a recreational user. And even if you are a heavy user, what if you are using it with approval in a state that allows the use of medical marijuana? Should that exclude you as well?
 

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Amazing Dragon Glass

Category: Glass | Posted on Tue, September, 24th 2013 by THCFinder

amazing-dragon-glass-bong


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Marijuana: The Next Diabetes Drug?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, September, 24th 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-the-new-diabetes-drugPatient comments were that: "Marijuana alleviates my pain," and "I started smoking marijuana to help my pain and it cured my Diabetes". With these two comments, I decided that I must browse the web to see if anybody else found that marijuana really did alleviate the Diabetes neuropathy pain.
 
It has been known in Great Britain where Cannabis as medicine was first introduced for obstetrical pain with Queen Victoria about 1850 that Cannabis/marijuana was effective for pain. The news got to the U.S. in a few months and the greatest use was in our Civil War to get wounded Veterans off opium and alcohol, which it successfully did.
 
In addition to its medical use, "Turkish parlors" (hash parlors) sprung up like mushrooms and were presumably used mostly by women who back in those days did not work outside of their homes. This was in the pre-"wine in the afternoon days".
 
Most people today are not aware that marijuana was very much socially acceptable, especially in the United States, between 1880 and 1941. Here is an excerpt from DrugLibrary.org: "...New York City, where marijuana "tea pads" were established about 1920. They resembled opium dens or speakeasies except that prices were very low; a man could get high for a quarter on marijuana smoked in the pad, or for even less if he bought the marijuana at the door and took it away to smoke.
 
"Most of the marijuana, it was said, was harvested from supplies growing wild on Staten Island or in New Jersey and other nearby states; marijuana and hashish imported from North Africa were more potent and cost more. These tea pads were tolerated by the city, much as alcohol speakeasies were tolerated. By the 1930s there were said to be 500 of them in New York City alone."
 
Getting to the subject, I looked up Marijuana for Diabetes and found a few references to pain (neuropathy) but when I punched up marijuana for diabetic neuropathy I discovered a tsunami with maybe about 35,000 posts. What I found was astonishing!
 
I found that millions of patients are afflicted with Diabetic neuropathy and it can affect almost every body system with neuropathy in the feet being the most troublesome. I also discovered the most common medications were, in a word, ridiculous. Those were: Tricyclic anti-depressants, other anti-depressants, anti-convulsants, opiates and opioids, and gabapentin (neurontin). None of these work well for the pain, and in effect cause Zombification.
 
Another list from 1999, by Dr. Aaron Vinik, included: Capsaicin (from chili peppers), Clondine, a brain depressant, Gabapentin (neurontin), Carbomazpine (an epilepsy drug), Dialantin (another anti-epileptic), and anti-depressants, again. I shuddered at this list.
 
The next oldest reference was from 2003 by Dr. Derrick Wade, at Oxford University, who wrote about neuro-genic symptoms which I conclude is "pain".
 
It is interesting to me that Dr. Sanjay Gupta in his "WEED epiphany" mentioned that marijuana was used in the U.S. to treat neuropathic pain until 1943. No reference was given. One reference in Nat Med Talk stated that the U.S. Government has a patent for the use of Cannabis for the treatment of neuropathic pain.
 

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Bubba Kush - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, September, 23rd 2013 by THCFinder

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Family credits rare medical marijuana with helping epileptic son

Category: News | Posted on Mon, September, 23rd 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-helps-healA California family says a rare type of medical marijuana has helped control their 7-year-old son’s severe epilepsy, Fox 40 reported.
 
Jayden David suffers from a debilitating form of epilepsy, which causes him to experience frequent seizures – some lasting up to 90 minutes. Until recently, Jayden took up to 20 types of medication every day in an attempt to control his condition.
 
However, when Jayden’s father, Jason David, discovered cannabidiol (CBD), a rare type of non-psychotic medical marijuana, he said it changed the young boy’s life.
 
David said the CBD, which he administers to his son in liquid form, has improved Jayden’s condition dramatically, reducing the number of seizures he suffers and allowing him to cut back on his medications.
 
“Jayden’s seizures are down approximately 80 percent. Jayden is functioning now,” David, of Modesto, Calif., told Fox 40. “The doctors told me Jayden would never walk or talk.”
 
However, the family says the drug is difficult to obtain – especially since the one pharmacy dispensing it in Modesto was shut down.
 
On Tuesday, David plans to appeal to the town’s city council to make it easier for his family to obtain CBD.
 
“It is a life and death situation for our children. We are parents, not pot heads. I consider myself a caregiver. I should not have to feel like a criminal,” David said.
 

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