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The Cannabis Bars

Category: Culture | Posted on Mon, June, 2nd 2014 by THCFinder
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Most people that are looking to have fun on a Friday or Saturday night are probably going to end up at a bar. There will probably be really loud music, a lot of drinking, and a lot of people... Which may end up leading to other issues later in the night. Some people can deal with the bars and of course, drink. Stoners, on the other hand, seem to gravitate towards the more calm places. A lot of people who smoke don't actually drink, or drink very little, leaving them to either be stuck as the designated driver when they go out or leading them to not go out at all. The cannabis industry has been taking huge strides this year, leaving many stoners hopeful for a place of their own.
 
In the legal/medicinal states, there are some places that have been springing up labeled as private clubs. These establishments cater specifically to stoners. Instead of walls lined with bottles, there are walls lined with bongs and rigs, ready to be rented, hit, and enjoyed. The bartender, rather then pouring drinks all night, checks to make sure that the patrons are using the equipment correctly and safely. And while there's music and a fun atmosphere, there's far less of a chance that you'll end up in the middle of an alcohol/testosterone fueled fight. The clubs are bring your own medicine, mostly, but there are some spots in Colorado that are beginning to push the limits.
 
The law in Colorado states that there can be no public or open consumption of marijuana, while the law in Washington states that marijuana cannot be consumed in view of the public. However, like most private clubs like Elks Lodges and such allow their customers to smoke cigars and cigarettes inside and there are cannabis clubs that are following that model. As long as there's less than three employees and the club is not open to the public, cannabis can be consumed inside of it. In Washington, the loophole would be a place having an enclosed patio or blacked out windows; as long as the public can't see marijuana being consumed.
 
For the stoners that don't like to drink and party like others, the future of cannabis cafes and bars is bright. There are hundreds of entrepreneurs that are working on getting licenses to run these sorts of businesses. As the business evolves, more shops will spring up, giving the more anti-social of the stoners a chance to get out of the house and be with other, like minded people. They won't be in an environment that makes them uncomfortable, but rather a place where they'll be able to relax and unwind, much like those who enjoy having a beer after work.

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Frosty White Widow Nugs - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder

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White Widow - Hybrid

White Widow buds are covered in crystals, giving it an almost sugared look. A relatively new strain developed in the early 1990's, it has been the subject of many rap songs and was frequently mentioned in the television show Weeds. It is a very potent and powerful variety of cannabis, available on the top of all Dutch coffee shop menus. The buzz is powerful and energetic yet social, be prepared for a strong high.


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The Colorado Symphony Orchestra staged a marijuana-friendly concert. It wasn't easy.

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
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If you wanted to attend the Colorado Symphony Orchestra’s first-ever marijuana-friendly concert last week, you had to follow the rules.
 
First, you had to be one of the lucky 250 or so who scored an invitation to the event, since the May 23 brass quintet concert, the first of four “Classically Cannabis” fundraising shows in the symphony’s “High Note Series,” wasn’t open to the public. Then, you had to be at least 21 years of age and bring your own cannabis. Finally, warned a lengthy disclaimer on the Web page for the event, each of the guests who donated at least $75 to attend assumed all risk associated with using pot; concert-goers had to agree to not hold accountable “the Colorado Symphony Orchestra … and their owners, partners, employees, directors, officers, agents, affiliates and related entities” if something went horribly wrong.
 
If you were a member of the media who showed up at the large, modern art gallery hosting the concert last Friday night, there were more rules to follow—such as, according to the press advisory, not going on the gallery’s open-air patio, the only place at venue where people could actually consume marijuana.
 
“I am watching history being made!” exclaimed a gray-haired woman packing a glass pipe.
This is what happens when you put on a pot-themed classical music concert: you get a lot of rules—not to mention a lot of attention. Reporters from the  New York Times and the Times of London prowled the gallery before the show and a camera crew from CBS This Morning zoomed in on the brass quintet as they straightened the special green ties they were wearing for the event. Well-dressed patrons—many of whom were associated with marijuana-related law firms, consulting companies or similar businesses—perused the modern art on the walls, then braved the evening drizzle to grab gourmet tacos and popsicles from the squadron of food trucks stationed out back for the event. 
 

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Cross Joint Madness

Category: Fun | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder

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There's More To Colorado Than Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
colorado-and-marijuanaColorado has certainly garnered a lot of attention since voters there decided to legalize marijuana in the 2012 election, but when it comes to drug reform, there’s a lot more going on in the Rocky Mountain State than just buds, blunts, and bongs. In the past few years, Colorado has taken significant steps toward more enlightened drug policies, and with the powerful coalitions that have emerged to push the agenda, more is likely to come.
 
Passed last year while all the attention was on the legislature’s race to get marijuana commerce regulations passed, the single most significant piece of broader drug reform legislation was Senate Bill 250, which aims to rein in and redirect corrections spending by reducing the number of drug offenders in prison.
 
The bill creates a separate sentencing system for drug offenders and allows people convicted of some felony drug charges to be sentenced to probation and community-based sentencing and see that felony charge changed to a misdemeanor conviction upon completion of probation. It allow provides that savings from the sentencing changes be plowed back into drug treatment.
 
The bill didn’t come out of nowhere. It was the outgrowth of a 2008 law that created the Colorado Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice. That panel brought together in one effort the heads of all the relevant state agencies as they grappled with how to reduce recidivism and put a brake on prison spending. It also provided an opportunity for groups like the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition (CCJRC) to start confronting the commission with research-based evidence about what does and doesn’t work.
 
“There is a lot of good evidence-based practice that shows what we did in the past didn’t work, and a lot of it had to do with national attention,” said Pam Clifton, communications coordinator for the CCJRC. “People were asking ‘How come half your people are going back to prison?’ Well, we didn’t have funding for treatment in Colorado. If you didn’t have any money, there wasn’t any place for you to go. Another problem was helping people on the front end. How can we be more proactive with people on probation? The recession gave us a little bit of leverage.”
 
But to get sentencing and drug reforms passed required not just a commission to come up with best policies and practices, but a political leadership that was willing to act. That came in 2008, when Colorado turned from red to blue, with a new Democratic governor, Bill Ritter, and Democrats in control of the legislature.
 
“When Bill Owens (R) was governor, he wasn’t going to let anything happen,” said Clifton. “But with the commission, a lot of conversations got started and we were able to educate about why change was needed, so when we had a change in leadership, there was a mandate from the commission to get good legislation passed. A lot of the recommendations the commission made went directly to the legislature, and when a bill showed up from the commission, it had a better opportunity to survive the process.”
 

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Girl Scout cookies nugs (Hybrid)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder

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Girl Scout Cookies - Hybrid

If you live in the Bay Area, you've likely heard of Girl Scout Cookies. Whether it's from one of the songs by the famous San Francisco rapper, Berner or actually trying it yourself, Girl Scout Cookies is a can't-miss strain that will medicate you beyond your wildest dreams. A potent mix of an OG Kush x Durban Poison x Cherry Kush mother backcrossed with a prime-looking OG Kush father created possibly one of the best Northern California strains of all time. For those of you who are into the Bay Area rap scene, you%u2019ve likely already smoked some of this off-the-charts weed after hearing some of the songs by San Francisco rapper and collective owner, Berner.


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