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Football Hall Of Famer Applies For Medical Marijuana Dispensary License

Category: Celebrities | Posted on Fri, May, 9th 2014 by THCFinder
hall-of-famer-applies-for-mj-dispensary-licenseJonathan Ogden, retired Baltimore Ravens offensive tackle, has applied for a medical marijuana dispensary license in Nevada, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal. There are a limited number of licenses available in Nevada, so it is still unclear whether or not Ogden will own a dispensary.
 
One hundred and nine other companies have filed applications, and only 66 will be licensed this year, 40 of which will reside in Las Vegas (Clark county) where Ogden has applied. Applicants must also show they have $250,000 in liquid assets and have a licensed physician as the medical director to apply.
 
Hopefully, the NFL will feel the pressure of having Hall of Fame leaders like Ogden publicly support medical marijuana. The NFL’s stance on medical marijuana hasn’t evolved to the same extent as that of the nation at large, and the organization still imposes strict laws on players via steep fines and suspensions. However, with the NBA and NCAA rethinking their marijuana-use policies, perhaps, the NFL will move in the direction of acceptance.
 

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Bubba OG - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Fri, May, 9th 2014 by THCFinder

bubba-og-weed

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Bubba OG - Indica

Bubba OG Kush is a must-have strain, but honestly if you haven't tried it yet you probably are living under a rock or on the East Coast - in which case it's not your fault. Bred by Breeder's Choice Organization, this potent indica-dominant strain will cause you to think about devouring your entire kitchen and then some. Bubba Kush has buds that are medium-sized and tight, dark-green buds. They are also completely infested with trichromes when grown as top-shelf bud.


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South Jersey's sole marijuana dispensary finds patients scarce

Category: Dispensaries | Posted on Fri, May, 9th 2014 by THCFinder
nj-dispensary-few-patients
Only six months after a grand opening, South Jersey's sole medical marijuana dispensary is struggling to survive.
 
This spring, Compassionate Care Foundation was planning to triple its production, using a $357,000 loan from the state Economic Development Authority. Simultaneously, the dispensary was preparing to convert cannabis leaves into liquid medicine, transdermal lotions, and lozenges, according to Bill Thomas, the nonprofit's CEO.
 
About 100 pounds of the leaves sit in brown grocery bags at the dispensary, waiting to be sent to a manufacturing plant in Pennsauken to be turned into the new products.
 
But where are the patients?
 
Located just outside Atlantic City, the dispensary has but 600, who currently can get only marijuana buds. The number is far short of what he needs to pay bills and support an expansion, Thomas said. For now, the $357,000 project to expand growing space is on hold.
 
When the nonprofit applied for one of six dispensary licenses offered three years ago by the state Department of Health, Compassionate Care projected it would have 5,000 patients upon opening and 10,000 in its second year. "Our cultivation facility has the capability of servicing up to 20,000 patients at two ounces per month," its bid said.
 
But so far, only 2,200 patients statewide have registered to buy cannabis.
 
Many patients complain that the application and doctor approval process takes three months, on average, and is too cumbersome for the program to succeed, Thomas said.
 
Patients also report they spend about $1,000 on doctor visits and registration "before they even get in the door" of the dispensary, he said.
 
Because of marijuana's uncertain status - it is still illegal under federal law - insurance does not cover the visits.
 
Nor does it cover the cost of the drug, about $400 an ounce.
 

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Pineapple Skunk

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

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Can you get fired for smoking medical marijuana?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
fired-for-smoking-medical-marijuanaEven as recreational marijuana usage is gaining acceptance, people who medicate with marijuana in most states can still get fired for failing their employer's drug test.
 
FORTUNE -- Acceptance of medical marijuana, and the patients who medicate with marijuana, is sweeping state legislatures across the country. Of the 21 states that have passed laws addressing medical marijuana, nine have done so in the past three years. A growing number of Americans appear willing to allow those with chronic illness or pain to alleviate their symptoms with the plant, quite apart from the issue of recreational use, which Colorado and Washington state recently approved.
 
But even as recreational usage is gaining acceptance, people who medicate with marijuana across most states can still get fired for failing their employers' drug test. Both Washington and Colorado have legalized recreational marijuana use, but it's still unclear whether employees' jobs are protected in those states if they smoke off duty -- either for recreation or medical use. In Colorado, for instance, the marijuana law allows employers to impose any drug policies they see fit.
There are a lot of unanswered questions, and it's time for U.S. lawmakers to clarify how companies should treat these cases. Regardless of a state's law, using marijuana remains a violation of federal law. This conflict has important consequences in the workplace: Employees are left with no protection and employers with little guidance.
 
Moreover, in a 2013 ruling, the Colorado Appellate Court said that because marijuana is still illegal under federal law employees could be fired for using it off duty.The case has gone to the Colorado Supreme Court; if it rules in favor of the employee, it would provide protection to thousands of medical marijuana users in Colorado and potentially influence other states to follow. If the court decides in favor of the employer, the status of registered users in Colorado remains unchanged: They have very little protection from losing their job.
Take the case of former Wal-Mart (WMT) employee Joseph Casias, who medicated with marijuana, off duty, in accordance with Michigan's Medical Marijuana Act to alleviate the symptoms of his sinus cancer and brain tumor. In 2009, after a workplace injury, he failed a company drug test. Wal-Mart fired him. The Michigan court upheld his firing because the state's medical marijuana law did not regulate private employment; it merely provided a defense against criminal prosecution. Similar incidents have occurred in California, Washington, and Oregon. Courts there have ruled in favor of employers who fired people for testing positive for marijuana though they were medicating with it off duty and in accordance with state laws.
 

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Come to the Dank Side ; )

Category: Fun | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

come-to-the-dank-side


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