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Sensi Star - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder

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sensi-star-indica sensi-start-weed-3 sensi-star-weed-2

Sensi Star - Indica

Sensi Star is a great indoor plant, producing powerful, resinous, and very compact buds. Although mostly indica, she retains a complex high that affects the mind as well as the body. This headstrong indica produces rock hard colas that have a lemony scent and taste. Some smokers find the buzz to be a very strong body stone, while others report a high with more energetic, cerebral properties as well as a body sensation. THC levels have been reported at 20 percent for this variety, making it a one-hitter quitter. CBD has been measured at .9 percent.


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Marijuana Use Lowers Risk Of Domestic Violence In Married Couples

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-lowers-domestic-violence-in-married-couplesPast research has indicated that couples who abuse substances are at a greater risk for divorce, in part because substance abuse often leads to an increase in domestic violence.
 
However, new research has found that when it comes to marijuana use, the opposite effect occurs: couples who frequently use marijuana are actually at a lower risk of partner violence.
 
Researchers from Yale University, University of Buffalo and Rutgers recruited 634 couples from 1996 to 1999 while they were applying for a marriage license in New York State. After an initial interview, the researchers followed the couples over the course of nine years using mail-in surveys to measure the effects of marijuana use on intimate partner violence (IPV).
 
The study defines IPV as acts of physical aggression, such as slapping, hitting, beating and choking, and it was measured by asking couples to report violence committed by them or toward them in the last year.
 
At the end of the first year, 37.1 percent of husbands had committed acts of domestic violence.
 
Marijuana use was measured by asking participants how often they used marijuana or hashish (defined as pot, weed, reefer, hash, hash oil or grass) in the last year. Participants were also asked about other drug use including alcohol, because, as the researchers explain the study, marijuana and alcohol are often used in conjunction.
 
What the researchers found surprised them: due to the fact that alcohol and other substances are known to increase domestic violence, they hypothesized that marijuana use would have the same effect. But that was not the case.
 
"More frequent marijuana use generally predicted less frequent IPV for both men and women over the first 9 years of marriage," the researchers wrote. Not only that, couples who both used marijuana frequently -- compared to one spouse using it more than the other -- had the lowest risk for partner violence.
 
Why would marijuana be different than other substances? Researchers hypothesize that the positive side effects of using marijuana may actually reduce conflict and aggression. They note that previous research has found chronic marijuana use to blunt emotional reactions, which could in turn decrease violent or aggressive behavior between spouses.
 

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Weed love

Category: Fun | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder

weed-love-fun


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Marijuana Party Buses Not Allowed In Washington State

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-party-buses-not-allowed-in-waParty buses are becoming more and more popular. Almost every weekend I see one or more of my friends take a party bus to or from an event, or just ride around in the party bus getting drunk and partying. The buses have dance lights and often have stripper poles. You can consume all the alcohol you want in the back portion of the bus. People in Washington tried to modify that idea and do it with a marijuana twist. Essentially, the bus takes you to the best marijuana stores around, and customers can then consume it on the party bus in a similar fashion as people do with alcohol on party buses. I think it’s a great idea, however, the idea was short lived, as the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission said that business model is illegal. Per the Seattle Times:
 
“You may not permit consumption or use of marijuana products on state-permitted charter and excursion vehicles, nor permit a driver to be exposed to marijuana smoke or vapor.”
 
What’s the logic?
 
“The commission believes activity in your vehicles is ‘in view of the general public,’ ” said the notice to operators. ”Your vehicles are ‘a public place’ or a ‘place of employment.’ “
 
This is yet another example of the hypocrisy that surrounds the rules of alcohol compared to marijuana. People can get completely inebriated in the back of a bus, but if people want to vaporize marijuana in the back of a bus, with a divider between the bus driver and the marijuana consumers, that’s not OK. Washington voters voted to regulate marijuana like alcohol. Either both substances should be allowed on party buses, or neither, but certainly not one over the other.
 

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Sour OG - Hybrid

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder

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Sour OG - Hybrid

Sour OG is a cross of Sour Diesel and OG Kush. A very nice weed to smoke, not overly powerful but provides a relaxing yet energetic high. Great for chilling with friends and laughing.


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In States With Medical Marijuana, Painkiller Deaths Drop by 25%

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 26th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-helping-with-painkiller-deaths
America has a major problem with prescription pain medications like Vicodin and OxyContin. Overdose deaths from these pharmaceutical opioids have approximately tripled since 1991, and every day 46 people die of such overdoses in the United States.
 
However, in the 13 states that passed laws allowing for the use of medical marijuana between 1999 and 2010, 25 percent fewer people die from opioid overdoses annually.
 
“The difference is quite striking,” said study co-author Colleen Barry, a health policy researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. The shift showed up quite quickly and become visible the year after medical marijuana was accepted in each state, she told Newsweek
 
In the study, published today August 25 in JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers hypothesize that in states where medical marijuana can be prescribed, patients may use pot to treat pain, either instead of prescription opiates, or to supplement them—and may thus require a lower dosage that is less likely to lead to a fatal problem.
 
As with most findings involving marijuana and public policy, however, not everyone agrees on a single interpretation of the results.
 
It certainly can be said that marijuana is much less toxic than opiates like Percocet or morphine, and that it is “basically impossible” to die from an overdose of weed, Barry said. Based on those agreed-upon facts, it would seem that an increased use in marijuana instead of opiates for chronic pain is the most obvious explanation of the reduction in overdose deaths.
 
Not so fast, said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, chief medical officer at Phoenix House, a national nonprofit addiction treatment agency. He said that the immediate reduction in overdose deaths is extremely unlikely to be due to the substitute use of the herb, for one simple reason: Marijuana isn’t widely prescribed for chronic pain.
 
“You don’t have primary care doctors in these states [prescribing] marijuana instead of Vicodin,” he said. Even in states where medical marijuana is legal, it is only prescribed by a small subset of doctors, and, therefore, probably couldn’t explain the huge decrease in opiate-related overdose deaths.
 
Kolodny says the study results are more likely due to a host of factors. One example is differences in state policies to cut down on over-prescribing of opiate medications. Also, many people who overdose on painkillers are already addicted, and these individuals are naturally among the most likely to take too much, Kolodny told Newsweek. States that pass progressive laws to treat addiction may be more likely to lower their rates of overdose deaths; for political reasons these states may also be more likely to legalize medical marijuana.
 

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