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Category: Fun | Posted on Fri, June, 13th 2014 by THCFinder

big-ass-kush-blunt


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Molybdenum Deficiency In Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, June, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
molybdenum-deficiency-in-cannabis-plantsMolybdenum deficiencies are quite uncommon, but they do have a higher incidence in marijuana strains that change colors in cold temperatures. The symptoms will start with middle leaves that turn yellow. The signs of the deficiency will move toward the shoots and younger leaves as they become twisted and curled.
 
Leaves will turn pale and have a fringed or scorched look. Their growth will also slow or look strange. Older leaves that have experienced chlorosis will have rolled margins, slowed growth, and tips that curl inward and are red.
 
It’s not uncommon to falsely think that a molybdenum deficiency is actually a nitrogen deficiency. But, molybdenum affects the middle of the marijuana plant and then moves up (making it extremely mobile) while nitrogen starts out at the bottom. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about nutrients and marijuana plants.
 
By contrast, an excess of molybdenum may resemble an iron or copper deficiency. Molybdenum primarily works from within enzymes to help transform nitrates into ammonia. The ammonia is important for protein production, making molybdenum rather essential.
 
Obviously, it’s important to stop a molybdenum deficiency before it even starts. Products like Marijuana Booster will certainly help with that endeavor. You may also want to use a foliar spray composed of water-soluble fertilizers. To avoid over-fertilization, use a small amount of a hydroponic micronutrient mix for this task. You can use them as foliar sprays or apply them directly to the soil.
 

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Starbud - Indica

Category: Nugs | Posted on Fri, June, 13th 2014 by THCFinder

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Medical Marijuana Bill Advances in New York

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, June, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
ny-medical-marijuana
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo raised doubts on Thursday about whether he would sign into law a medical marijuana bill advancing through the state Legislature.
 
The bill, known as the Compassionate Care Act, was transferred out of the Senate Finance Committee over the previous objections of its chairman. That puts it within striking distance of a vote on the Senate floor, with the Legislature due to break for the year next Thursday.
 
The bill, which the Assembly passed earlier this year, would have New York joining its neighbors, New Jersey and Connecticut, in legalizing medical marijuana. It would create a growth and distribution system for the drug and allow health-care practitioners to prescribe it for cancer and other serious conditions.
 
 
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo European Pressphoto Agency
In January, Mr. Cuomo introduced a more limited pilot program that doesn't require legislative approval. On Thursday at an unrelated event in upstate Peekskill, the Democratic governor said he was concerned the Legislature's effort could backfire.
 
"This sets up an entire system for marijuana growing, production, distribution, sales, and if you're not careful and the system isn't done well, this could actually turn into a major negative," Mr. Cuomo said, calling marijuana a gateway drug for other illegal substances.
 
"We want to make it work," he said. "But we also recognize the downside, which is if you don't put in the correct system, you could have a serious problem on your hands."
 
The medical marijuana issue is coming to the fore during an election year when lawmakers and Mr. Cuomo had been focusing instead on a series of anti-heroin measures, among a handful of issues expected to be in focus before lawmakers leave Albany.
 
The broader legalization effort gained steam after the governor's idea to make pot available to the very ill was criticized by some advocates as too limited.
 
The governor envisions a distribution system confined to 20 hospitals statewide, a program that is dependent on federal approval, since without it hospitals could jeopardize their federal funding. Marijuana is illegal under federal law, even as states move to legalize it.
 

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Blockhead Weed

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, June, 12th 2014 by THCFinder

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New Report Blasts DEA For Spending 4 Decades Obstructing Marijuana Science

Category: News | Posted on Thu, June, 12th 2014 by THCFinder
dea-obstructing-cannabis-science-for-yearsThe Drug Enforcement Administration has been impeding and ignoring the science on marijuana and other drugs for more than four decades, according to a report released this week by the Drug Policy Alliance, a drug policy reform group, and the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies, a marijuana research organization.
 
“The DEA is a police and propaganda agency," Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance, said Wednesday. “It makes no sense for it to be in charge of federal decisions involving scientific research and medical practice."
 
The report alleges that the DEA has repeatedly failed to act in a timely fashion when faced with petitions to reschedule marijuana. The drug is currently classified as Schedule I, which the DEA reserves for the "most dangerous" drugs with "no currently accepted medical use." Schedule I drugs, which include substances like heroin and LSD, cannot receive federal funding for research. On three separate occasions -- in 1973, 1995 and again in 2002 -- the DEA took years to make a final decision about a rescheduling petition, and in two of the cases the DEA was sued multiple times to force a decision.
 
The report criticizes the DEA for overruling its own officials charged with determining how illicit substances should be scheduled. It also criticizes the agency for creating a "regulatory Catch-22" by arguing there is not enough scientific evidence to support rescheduling marijuana while simultaneously impeding the research that would produce such evidence.
 
A spokesperson at the DEA declined to comment on the report.
 
The feds have long been accused of only funding marijuana research that focuses on the potential negative effects of the substance, but that trend appears to be changing.
 
According to The Hill, the National Institute on Drug Abuse has conducted about 30 studies to date on the potential benefits of marijuana. NIDA oversees the cultivation, production and distribution of marijuana grown for research purposes at the University of Mississippi in the only federally legal marijuana garden in the U.S. -- a process through which the only federally sanctioned marijuana studies are approved.
 
The joint report comes less than two weeks after the House approved three amendments taking aim at the DEA and its ability to enforce federal marijuana and hemp laws in states which have legal marijuana operations and industrial hemp programs. The medical marijuana amendment was sponsored by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-Calif.).
 
"Nobody should be afraid of the truth," Rohrabacher said Wednesday. "There's a lot of other drugs that have harmful side effects. Is the downside of marijuana a harmful side effect? Or is there a positive side that actually does help? That needs to be proven."
 

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