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Purple Kush - Indica Strain

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder

 

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Purple Kush - Indica

This pure indica medicinal strain comes from California. In that state's medical community she is considered an "elite clone", meaning that it is only available as a cutting. Not to worry if you are a medical marijuana patient in California - this strain can be found at various dispensaries throughout the state. Patients there praise Purple Kush's deep body stone as a good treatment for pain and depression.


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Ban of medical marijuana in hospitals threatens sick children

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
ban-of-mmj-in-hospitcals-threatens-sick-childrenDIXFIELD, Maine (NEWS CENTER) -- Twelve-year-old Cyndiamae Meehan loves painting and drawing to express herself. Watching her, it's hard to believe that she couldn't paint with a steady hand several months ago.
 
"We noticed the cognitive brightening, we notice her talking more with us when she's coloring, she is looking at the shape she is coloring instead of randomly coloring a page," said Cyndiamae's mother, Susan Meehan.
 
Things that never happened before, like running, playing, feeding herself, are now a reality because of medical marijuana, according to her parents. Cyndiamae has Dravet Syndrome, a rare and severe form of epilepsy, that left her with constant seizures. The seizures turned off her brain and kept her from developing at a normal pace. After trying 23 different epileptic drugs with little success, her neurologist suggested that Cyndimae and her family move from their Connecticut home to Maine, where she could be legally treated with medical marijuana or cannabis.
 
Once in Maine, Meehan began using a rescue medication consisting of specific marijuana strains whenever her daughter had a grand mal seizure. This type of seizure causes a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions. Family members started taking video of the seizures to show Cyndimae's doctors. The video shows that once given the rescue medication, the seizure slowly stops. In the past ten months, Meehan said she has weaned Cyndimae off all of her medications.
 
"Without the cannabis, we would still be in that situation where she would be so drugged she couldn't eat. She is up to 85 pounds now which is just amazing. Her muscle tone is good," said Meehan.
 
Meehan said that medical marijuana saved her daughter's life. It is a controversial treatment, but more parents are turning to it for seizure treatment. Four-year old Kaylee Brown suffered her first seizure at 9-months-old.
 
"It ended turning into a full blow very severe seizure. She was turning blue, salivating profusely and when we go to the hospital she finally responded to medications," Kalyee's mother, Samantha Brown.
 
Doctors prescribed Kaylee medications that caused horrible side effects and more seizures. Kaylee was eventually diagnosed with a mild form of Dravet syndrome. After hearing other success stories, Brown began Kaylee on cannabis and tried weaning her daughter off other medications. The combination was too much for the small child, and doctors put Kaylee in a medically iunduced coma this past summer. Kaylee was transferred to Maine Medical Center and while at the hospital, the neurologist on duty discovered that Kaylee was using medical marijuana and asked Brown if she had the drug with her.
 

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Double the fun

Category: Fun | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder

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FBI: Marijuana Arrests Down, Enforcement Still Wastes Over 457 Million Annually

Category: News | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
wasting-money-fighting-against-marijuanaNew arrest data has been released by the F.B.I., which shows that marijuana arrests have declined, but an enormous amount of money is still being wasted on enforcing failed policies. Below is a reaction from NORML and StopTheDrugWar.Org:
 
By Erik Altieri, NORML Communications Director
 
The FBI’s annual Uniform Crime Report was released this morning and provides an updated look at the total number of marijuana arrests law enforcement made across the country in 2013.
 
The good news is that numbers are down slightly from 2012’s arrest figures. In 2012, there were about 749,825 marijuana arrests (compared to 757,969 in 2011).
 
The new report shows a modest decrease in arrests. In 2013, there was a total of 693,481 arrests made for marijuana charges, with the overwhelming majority of these being for simple possession. Law enforcement made about 609,423 arrests for possession alone, a decrease of 48,808 arrests compared to 2012. While we may be seeing slight decreases due to the growing number of states who have begun to reform their marijuana policies, the fact that over 600,000 individuals are still being arrested for a non-violent act shows how much work we have left to do in ending our disastrous prohibition of marijuana.
 
Using the ACLU low-level estimate of cost per arrest ($750), the minimum enforcement cost for the 609,423 individuals put in handcuffs for just marijuana possession in 2013 would be in excess of $457,067,250.
 

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Sour Diesel (Sativa)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder

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Sour Diesel - Sativa

A sativa-dominant hybrid, Sour Diesel has a Diesel / candy-like smell and a very distinct taste. Great for energy and focus, and works well in the daytime when you have to get things done.


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The brains of marijuana users are different

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, November, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
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Earlier this year, one study suggested that even casual marijuana use could cause changes to the brain. Another found that marijuana use was also associated with poor sperm quality, which could lead to infertility in men.
 
But marijuana advocates point to other research indicating that the drug is far less addictive than other drugs, and some studies have found no relationship between IQ and marijuana use in teens.
 
Researchers at the Center for Brain Health at the University of Texas in Dallas sought to clear up some of the confusion with a study that looked at a relatively large group of marijuana users and evaluated their brains for a slew of different indicators.
 
What they found was complex, but the pattern was clear: The brains of marijuana users were different than those of non-marijuana users. The area of the brain responsible for establishing the reward system that helps us survive and also keeps us motivated was smaller in users than in non-marijuana users. But there was also evidence that the brain compensated for this loss of volume by increasing connectivity and the structural integrity of the brain tissue.
 
Those effects were more pronounced for marijuana users who started young.
 
"The orbitofrontal cortex is one of the primary regions in a network of brain areas called the reward system," explained Francesca Filbey, lead author of the study and an associate professor of the neurogenetics of addictive behavior at the University of Texas in Dallas. "It helps us determine what is good for us and what keeps us sustained. "In this case, the orbitofrontal cortex plays a role in drug use because drug use and things associated with it --paraphernalia for example -- are associated with the rewarding effects of drugs."
 
The study, published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, used MRI scans to look at the brains of 62 non-marijuana users and 48 regular marijuana users, 27 of whom used marijuana but not other drugs. The marijuana users reported ingesting the drug about three times a day --  very heavy use -- and had used it for an average of about 10 years.
 
Looking first at atypically heavy marijuana use is necessary to identify structural effects, if there are any, Filbey said. Subsequent research would look at varying levels of use to find out if differences compared to non-users are still observed. For example, in Colorado, only about 22 percent of marijuana users reported using the drug about once a day at most.
 
Relative to other studies, this one had a fairly large sample size; it also excluded participants who had symptoms of psychosis, brain injury or neurological disorders in order to reduce the likelihood that the tests would pick up on other confounding factors. And it looked at three brain characteristics: the volume of the orbitofrontal cortex, how connected that part of the brain was to other areas, and the structural integrity of the white matter.
 
"We found that while the orbitofrontal cortex was smaller, there was greater functional and structural connectivity," said Filbey. "The white matter seemed to have greater integrity than the [non-marijuana using group]. And the connection between the orbitofrontal cortex and other areas were stronger."
 
That's potentially positive news suggesting that whatever impact marijuana use might have on the size or volume of that part of the brain, it may be offset by better connectivity and structural soundness. "It suggests that there is definitely a more complicated pattern that the brain seems to be able to compensate for any kind of loss in order to keep that network maintained," Filbey said.
 

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