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Gun owner denied License for legally using marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
gun-owner-denied-license-for-legally-using-marijuana
SEATTLE -- With recreational marijuana sales about to begin in Washington State, legal gun owners are facing a "don't ask, don't tell" dilemma. The gun owners are grappling with the idea of admitting they use marijuana, which goes up against federal firearm laws.
 
I-502 made possession of marijuana for adults legal in the state of Washington. The Second Amendment gives every law abiding American the right to bear firearms, but the two don't coexist very well when it comes to marijuana. The conflict between federal and state law is putting police and gun-owning marijuana users in the middle.  
 
It's a conflict Bobbi Jo Floyd of Richland knows all too well.
 
"People know who I am, a lot of people do," said Floyd, who is an officiant and has presided over 2,000 weddings in the tri-cities area. 
 
Floyd is also an outspoken proponent of medical marijuana and an authorized patient.
 
"I'm also a Republican and I believe in my guns," she said.  
 
In January she went to apply for a concealed pistol license at the Richland Police Station. Skinner says in Washington, a CPL is not a right, but considered a privilege granted at the discretion of the issuing agency, which tends to be the applicant's home town police agency.  Most people are granted a CPL after passing a criminal background check.
 
Floyd had no problems with any question on the application, except when it came to question number five, which asks, "Are you an unlawful user of, or addicted to, marijuana?"
 
"I answered it 'no' because how I read it is,  are you an 'illegal user' or addicted to marijuana, and I don't feel I'm either," Floyd said.  
 
That's when something unusual happened. Floyd was asked to provide her medical marijuana authorization card.
 
"An employee recognized me and she asked me to attach my medical license on my application," she said. 
 
With nothing to hide, Floyd says she obliged.  A couple of weeks later, she got her application back in the mail. It was denied.
 
With the denial came a letter for Richland Police Chief Chris Skinner who wrote Floyd was not eligible to receive a CPL because she had an authorization to possess cannabis. Skinner also cited Federal law, 18 U.S.C. 922(g)(3) which prohibits any son who is an "unlawful user of, or addicted to any controlled substance" from shipping, transporting, receiving or possessing firearms or ammunition.
 

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Mary Jane is all I need ; )

Category: Tokers | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder

all-the-love-i-need


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Californias 2013 Marijuana Harvest Was Worth 31 Billion Dollars

Category: News | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-harvest-worth-millions
Marijuana is big business in California. How big? According to a recently released report, California’s 2013 marijuana harvests were worth 31 billion dollars. Yes, that’s billion, with a B. This number is of course an estimate and not an exact figure due to the fact that California’s marijuana industry is hard to pin down. The true number could be a bit off of that number, or could be even larger than that number. Regardless of how exact the number is, one thing is for sure – California’s marijuana industry is enormous.
 
Imagine if the industry didn’t operate in the shadows, and was allowed to operate above-board. How much tax revenue would that generate for the State of California? According to California NORML, taxes from legalized marijuana sales in California could generate upwards of 2.5 billion dollars for the State. Anyone who has ever traveled to California or lives in California knows firsthand just how bad the State of California needs revenue right now.
 
California was the first state to vote on marijuana legalization during the 2010 Election. Unfortunately, that initiative was voted down. However, it was the first time any state had ever run a campaign to legalize marijuana, and I think the campaign did a commendable job navigating the uncharted territory. California, and other states, learned a lot from that campaign.
 
I’m confident that California will have another opportunity to vote on marijuana legalization, this time during the 2016 Election. It’s a presidential election year, which worked very well for Colorado and Washington during the 2012 Election. I wish the same was true for Oregon, which also voted on marijuana legalization during the 2012 Election. However, unfortunately, the campaign in Oregon was grossly underfunded. A successful California campaign in 2016 will need more money than all three of the 2012 campaigns combined, which I’m hoping won’t be an issue.
 

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Fat Albert Weed

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder

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Edibles - Don't Eat the Whole Thing

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-ediblesIn a 30,000-square-foot facility in north Denver, the 40 or so employees of Dixie Elixirs and Edibles are busy producing marijuana-infused candies, sodas, eyedroppers of sublingual Dew Drops, vape pens, massage oils, bath salts, and other marijuana goodies. In one of the facility’s several industrial kitchens, a team of hairnet-clad workers take individual chocolate Dixie Rolls from an extrusion machine and package them in swank silver wrappers. On the main factory floor, an engineer puts the finishing touches on an automated bottling line, part of the facility’s ongoing $5 million renovation project, which will soon be filling 1,000 bottles an hour with Dixie’s THC-infused “elixirs,” including flavors like mandarin, red currant, and old-fashioned sarsaparilla. Nearby, other workers fill shipping crates with the 2,000 or so products the four-year-old company ships out daily to its clientele, which comprises roughly 90 percent of all Colorado marijuana retailers.
 
When Dixie moved into this facility in early November, the ambitious expansion project made sense. Marijuana-infused food products seemed primed to be the big winner once Colorado’s new recreational marijuana industry launched in January. Edibles seemed fun, discreet, and consumer-friendly, with none of the health risks and fewer of the taboos associated with smoking pot.
 
But lately, while chief marketing officer Joe Hodas says Dixie still enjoys healthy sales, the products it sells have been generating troubling headlines. New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd dedicated her column last week to describing how she “lay curled up in a hallucinatory state” for eight hours after eating too much of a marijuana candy bar she bought at a Denver pot shop. While Dowd’s unhappy trip quickly became the stuff of Twitter hilarity, other edibles-related incidents haven’t been so funny. Colorado hospitals are reporting an uptick in emergency room visits after children accidentally eat marijuana goodies. In March, a college student from Wyoming ate a marijuana cookie and then tumbled over a railing in a Denver hotel and fell to his death. In June, a Denver woman called 911 and said her husband had eaten a marijuana candy along with pain killers and was ranting about the end of the world—not long before he allegedly shot her to death. So why is it that the kinder, gentler version of getting high has suddenly become the industry’s biggest liability?
 
Part of the problem is that while pot-infused goodies might seem like an easy way for newbies to explore marijuana use, the reality is the opposite. Colorado’s edibles industry developed over the past few years as part of the medical marijuana scene—where the clientele were anything but newbies, tolerating and often demanding a very potent product. “We didn’t have a full spectrum of demand,” explains Hodas of Dixie’s origins as a medical product. “But the market [today] is demonstrating that not everyone wants these very potent products.” It doesn’t help that, because of how it’s metabolized, edible marijuana takes much longer to kick in than the smoked version. As Dowd learned the hard way, it’s all too easy for marijuana novices to gobble up way too much of an edible before they realize just how big a dose they’ve consumed.
 

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Super Sour OG

Category: Nugs | Posted on Tue, June, 10th 2014 by THCFinder

super-sour-og-weed

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Super Sour OG - Hybrid

Sour OG is a cross of Sour Diesel and OG Kush. A very nice weed to smoke, not overly powerful but provides a relaxing yet energetic high. Great for chilling with friends and laughing.


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