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Missouri House Passes Bill To Legalize Hemp Cultivation

Category: News | Posted on Sat, April, 25th 2015 by THCFinder

missouri hempHemp is a very versatile plant. Some estimates say that hemp can be used to make over 25,000 products. Importing hemp and hemp products is legal in the United States, but hemp cultivation is not allowed at the federal level. Even in states that have legalized hemp cultivation, farmers are having a hard time getting an actual crop started due to federal prohibition (such as in Oregon). Missouri used to be one of the top hemp producing states in America. Missouri’s House of Representatives passed a hemp cultivation bill this week. Per The Joint Blog:

Missouri’s House of Representatives has given initial approval to House Bill 830, a proposal to legalize the production and cultivation of industrial hemp. A companion bill,Senate Bill 255, has already been approved unanimously by the Senate Committee on Agriculture, Food Production and Outdoor Resources.

If passed into law, House Bill 830 would remove hemp from the state’s list of controlled substance, reclassifying it as a legal agricultural product in the state. The bill would establish a system of licensing and regulations for those wanting to grow the crop, which would be defined as having no more than 0.3% THC. The proposal explicitly states that a change in federal law – or approval from the federal government – will not be required for the state to begin implementation of the law.

Missouri’s farmers deserve to grow a crop that is completely harmless. Virtually all of the arguments against hemp cultivation are not based upon science, but instead are based upon politics and fear mongering. The focus now moves to the Missouri Senate, where I’m hopeful it will pass considering SB 255 already received a unanimous approval from a key Senate Committee. A thriving hemp industry would help out Missouri quite a bit.

Source:http://www.theweedblog.com/missouri-house-passes-bill-to-legalize-hemp-cultivation/


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Federal Bill Could End Prohibition Across the United States in 2015

Category: Legalization | Posted on Sat, April, 25th 2015 by THCFinder

If a state passes a law deeming marijuana a legal substance, the federal government should have no authority over the prosecution of individuals for crimes associated with the substance. This is the battle cry of a recent piece of legislation, which swept through Capitol Hill this week on bipartisan wings, aimed at blocking Uncle Sam from unleashing the dogs of the drug war against states that have legalized the leaf for medicinal or recreational purposes.

The bill entitled the “Respect State Marijuana Laws Act of 2015” was introduced to Congress earlier this week by Representative Dana Rohrabacher of California. It seeks to provide immunity against federal prosecution for individuals and businesses abiding state marijuana laws. And while this legislative offering is a short document, the implications between the lines are substantial, as it suggests the passing of this measure could be all that is needed to basically eliminate prohibition on a federal level. 

Unlike the CARERS Act, which is a bid to legalize medical marijuana nationwide, Rohrabacher’s latest proposal would extend the same protection the medical sector of the cannabis industry needs to the recreational side, which would allow states the ability to legalize weed for any purpose without concerns over violating federal statutes.

“The American people, through the 35 states that have liberalized laws banning either medical marijuana, marijuana in general, or cannabinoid oils, have made it clear that federal enforcers should stay out of their personal lives," Rohrabacher said in a statement. "It’s time for restraint of the federal government’s over-aggressive weed warriors.” 

Read More:http://www.hightimes.com/read/federal-bill-could-end-prohibition-across-united-states-2015


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What strain are you smoking on today?

Category: Fun | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder


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Illinois House moves toward decriminalizing marijuana possession

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, April, 24th 2015 by THCFinder

Getting caught with a small amount of marijuana would result in a fine instead of arrest under a measure the Illinois House approved Thursday.
 
Low-level cannabis possession would go from a crime with fines of up to $2,500 and up to a year in jail to be more like a traffic ticket: no court time and a fine of up to $125. The measure would apply to people caught with 15 grams or less, the equivalent of about 25 cigarette-size joints.
 
Sponsoring Rep. Kelly Cassidy, D-Chicago, said the measure wouldn't override laws in cities like Chicago that already have fines in place for marijuana possession but is aimed at creating a uniform penalty throughout the state and eliminating the option for police to arrest people carrying small amounts of pot.
 
"We currently have a patchwork of local ordinances where there is the possibility of getting a ticket but not a given that you'll get a ticket, so it's an open question where you go whether you're going to get arrested or get a ticket," Cassidy said. "That creates a system whereby it depends on where you live, and what you look like, and unfortunately more often than not, it is folks who are black and brown who are being arrested, who are being pulled off the streets, pulled away from their jobs and their families and put into our jails and prisons."
 
The House bill comes days after Cook County State's Attorney Anita Alvarez announced her office would stop prosecuting low-level marijuana possession cases for people with fewer than three arrests or citations. It also follows a measure enacted by Chicago in 2012 that allowed police to issue tickets of $250 to $500 for someone caught with 15 grams or less of marijuana.
 
he proposal, sent to the Senate on a 62-53 vote, drew support from both Republican and Democratic lawmakers. Republican Rep. Ron Sandack of Downers Grove said the legislation fits in with Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's goal of reducing the number of adults and juveniles sent to jail by 25 percent over 10 years.
 
"I think police have been bogged down with petty possession crimes," Sandack said. "I think courts have been bogged down with petty possession crimes. These people, they're not dealers. They have no intent to sell."
 

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