Marijuana Blog

Mute Autistic 9-Year-Old Speaks For First Time After Consuming Cannabis Oil

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, June, 5th 2015 by THCFinder

cannabidiol cbd cannabis marijuanaI used to think marijuana was just a plant that got me really high and was fun to smoke with my friends. I didn’t realize its medicinal benefits until I began studying the plant as medicine extensively four years ago.

Now, thanks to cannabis-and specifically CBD oil-I believe the plant produces miracles. The latest proof of CBD as a miraculous sorcerer’s stone that aids those previously without a “cure” comes out of Puerto Rico-and it’s a tear-jerker.

Thanks to a rare form of cancer resulting in “severe, non-verbal autism”, Kalel Santiago lived the first nine years of his life without uttering a single syllable. Then, recently, his parents discovered the newfound miracle plant: CBD oil, the non-psychoactive ingredient in cannabis that cures epilepsy and saves lives.

His parents administered the oil on Kalel, and the result was the boy’s first spoken words in his lifetime-and it only took two days of using the medicine to begin seeing the results.

They took home the tiny sample bottle of spray and began giving their son twice daily doses, as directed on the label, right into his mouth. And the results, they say, were startling: Kalel started talking — in just two days.

He surprised us in school by saying the vowels, A-E-I-O-U. It was the first time ever,” Abiel says. “You can’t imagine the emotion we had, hearing Kalel’s voice for the first time. It was amazing. The teacher recorded him and sent it to my wife and me and we said well, the only different thing we have been doing is using the CBD.” Soon thereafter, he adds, Kalel started using consonants to connect his sounds. “He said, ‘amo mi mama,’ ‘I love my mom,'” Abiel says. “I don’t know how to thank [the CBD oil makers].” [Yahoo

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Cannabis Might Be the Next Migraine Drug

Category: News | Posted on Fri, June, 5th 2015 by THCFinder

recent review of medical literature, courtesy of the Headache Center at the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, has shown that cannabis has potential therapeutic effects for the treatment of headache disorders, including migraines.

Some British doctors have been treating headaches and migraines with cannabis since the 1840’s, but nearly worldwide prohibition in the 20th Century made medical cannabis research grind to a halt until fairly recently. Some evidence exists for treating headache disorders with cannabis, but nowadays the standards for prescription drugs have risen, and researchers need to prove the efficacy of a drug before patients can legally take it.

Hopefully, this recent publication will act as a spark for new research into cannabis as a headache treatment, so doctors can start prescribing it. Sufferers of painful migraines and cluster headaches deserve a treatment that’s not only functional, but also void of any harmful side effects.

Headaches or not, cannabis shows strong evidence for pain relief treatment.

“A review of 38 published randomized controlled trials evaluating cannabinoids in pain management revealed that 71 percent concluded that cannabinoids had empirically demonstrable and statistically significant pain-relieving effects, whereas 29 percent did not,” Eric P. Baron of the Cleveland Clinic Department of Neurology and author of the report said.

Human biology can back this up as well. 

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Turtle Blunt.

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, June, 4th 2015 by THCFinder


Minnesota doctors reluctant to sign off on medical marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, June, 4th 2015 by THCFinder

Large numbers of Minnesota doctors say they won’t sign their patients up for medical marijuana.

Two-thirds of physicians who responded to a Minnesota Medical Association survey this week said they will not participate in the state’s medical cannabis registry. Just 9 percent of respondents said they would be certifying patients.

Medical marijuana will be legal — in limited form — in Minnesota on July 1, but to participate in the program, patients must be certified by a doctor or other medical professional to prove they have one of nine qualifying conditions.

Doctors can opt out of certification, and some already have. When Shelly Rapp of Chanhassen asked her neurologist to certify her 18-year-old son Scott, who uses a wheelchair because of epilepsy, she was told that while he was willing, his practice as a whole had opted out of the Health Department program.

“He called me today, and was really nice, but said he was unable to help,” she said.

Scott had tried medical cannabis while the family was living in California last year, and Rapp said a few drops of the oil a day not only cut his seizures from hundreds a day to just a handful, but allowed him to wean off his other seizure drugs. She’s eager to get him back on cannabis oil, but first she needs to find a doctor, nurse or clinic willing to certify to the state’s Office of Medical Cannabis that Scott has epilepsy.

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