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Cannabis Might Be the Next Migraine Drug

Category: News | Posted on Thu, June, 4th 2015 by THCFinder

recent review of medical literature, courtesy of the Headache Center at the Cleveland Clinic Neurological Institute in Cleveland, Ohio, has shown that cannabis has potential therapeutic effects for the treatment of headache disorders, including migraines.

Some British doctors have been treating headaches and migraines with cannabis since the 1840’s, but nearly worldwide prohibition in the 20th Century made medical cannabis research grind to a halt until fairly recently. Some evidence exists for treating headache disorders with cannabis, but nowadays the standards for prescription drugs have risen, and researchers need to prove the efficacy of a drug before patients can legally take it.

Hopefully, this recent publication will act as a spark for new research into cannabis as a headache treatment, so doctors can start prescribing it. Sufferers of painful migraines and cluster headaches deserve a treatment that’s not only functional, but also void of any harmful side effects.

Headaches or not, cannabis shows strong evidence for pain relief treatment.

“A review of 38 published randomized controlled trials evaluating cannabinoids in pain management revealed that 71 percent concluded that cannabinoids had empirically demonstrable and statistically significant pain-relieving effects, whereas 29 percent did not,” Eric P. Baron of the Cleveland Clinic Department of Neurology and author of the report said.

Human biology can back this up as well. 

Read More:http://www.hightimes.com/read/cannabis-might-be-next-migraine-drug


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Turtle Blunt.

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, June, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder


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Minnesota doctors reluctant to sign off on medical marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, June, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

Large numbers of Minnesota doctors say they won’t sign their patients up for medical marijuana.

Two-thirds of physicians who responded to a Minnesota Medical Association survey this week said they will not participate in the state’s medical cannabis registry. Just 9 percent of respondents said they would be certifying patients.

Medical marijuana will be legal — in limited form — in Minnesota on July 1, but to participate in the program, patients must be certified by a doctor or other medical professional to prove they have one of nine qualifying conditions.

Doctors can opt out of certification, and some already have. When Shelly Rapp of Chanhassen asked her neurologist to certify her 18-year-old son Scott, who uses a wheelchair because of epilepsy, she was told that while he was willing, his practice as a whole had opted out of the Health Department program.

“He called me today, and was really nice, but said he was unable to help,” she said.

Scott had tried medical cannabis while the family was living in California last year, and Rapp said a few drops of the oil a day not only cut his seizures from hundreds a day to just a handful, but allowed him to wean off his other seizure drugs. She’s eager to get him back on cannabis oil, but first she needs to find a doctor, nurse or clinic willing to certify to the state’s Office of Medical Cannabis that Scott has epilepsy.

Read More:http://www.startribune.com/survey-minnesota-doctors-uneasy-about-medical-marijuana/306057661/


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Congress Votes To End DEA’s Invasive Bulk Data Collection Program And Slashes Agency’s Budget

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, June, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

drug war drug treatment centersLegislators voted by a simple voice vote last night to end the DEA’s controversial bulk data collection programs, as part of the U.S. House of Representatives’ consideration of the Fiscal Year 2016 Commerce, Justice, and Science Appropriations bill. The House also passed three amendments that cut $23 million from the DEA’s budget, and shifted it to fighting child abuse, processing rape test kits, reducing the deficit, and paying for body cameras on police officers to reduce law enforcement abuses.

Representatives debated four amendments to prohibit the DEA and Justice Department from undermining state marijuana laws — and those votes will happen later today.

“Congress dealt a major blow to the DEA by ending their invasive and offensive bulk data collection programs and by cutting their budget, said Bill Piper, director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance. “The more the DEA ignores commonsense drug policy, the more they will see their agency’s power and budget come under deeper scrutiny.”

Three amendments cutting the DEA’s budget passed by voice vote. Rep. Ted Liew’s (D-CA) amendment shifted $9 million from the DEA’s failed Cannabis Reduction and Eradication program to the VAWA Consolidated Youth Oriented Program ($4 million), Victims of Child Abuse Act ($3 million), and deficit reduction ($2 million). Rep. Steve Cohen’s (D-TN) amendment shifted $4 million from the DEA to a program to reduce the nation’s backlog in processing of rape test kits. Rep. Joaquin Castro’s (D-TX) amendment shifted $9 million from the DEA to body cameras for police officers to reduce police abuse.

Read More:http://www.theweedblog.com/congress-end-dea-invasive-bulk-data-collection-slashes-agencys-budget/


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