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Can you get fired for smoking medical marijuana?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
fired-for-smoking-medical-marijuanaEven as recreational marijuana usage is gaining acceptance, people who medicate with marijuana in most states can still get fired for failing their employer's drug test.
 
FORTUNE -- Acceptance of medical marijuana, and the patients who medicate with marijuana, is sweeping state legislatures across the country. Of the 21 states that have passed laws addressing medical marijuana, nine have done so in the past three years. A growing number of Americans appear willing to allow those with chronic illness or pain to alleviate their symptoms with the plant, quite apart from the issue of recreational use, which Colorado and Washington state recently approved.
 
But even as recreational usage is gaining acceptance, people who medicate with marijuana across most states can still get fired for failing their employers' drug test. Both Washington and Colorado have legalized recreational marijuana use, but it's still unclear whether employees' jobs are protected in those states if they smoke off duty -- either for recreation or medical use. In Colorado, for instance, the marijuana law allows employers to impose any drug policies they see fit.
There are a lot of unanswered questions, and it's time for U.S. lawmakers to clarify how companies should treat these cases. Regardless of a state's law, using marijuana remains a violation of federal law. This conflict has important consequences in the workplace: Employees are left with no protection and employers with little guidance.
 
Moreover, in a 2013 ruling, the Colorado Appellate Court said that because marijuana is still illegal under federal law employees could be fired for using it off duty.The case has gone to the Colorado Supreme Court; if it rules in favor of the employee, it would provide protection to thousands of medical marijuana users in Colorado and potentially influence other states to follow. If the court decides in favor of the employer, the status of registered users in Colorado remains unchanged: They have very little protection from losing their job.
Take the case of former Wal-Mart (WMT) employee Joseph Casias, who medicated with marijuana, off duty, in accordance with Michigan's Medical Marijuana Act to alleviate the symptoms of his sinus cancer and brain tumor. In 2009, after a workplace injury, he failed a company drug test. Wal-Mart fired him. The Michigan court upheld his firing because the state's medical marijuana law did not regulate private employment; it merely provided a defense against criminal prosecution. Similar incidents have occurred in California, Washington, and Oregon. Courts there have ruled in favor of employers who fired people for testing positive for marijuana though they were medicating with it off duty and in accordance with state laws.
 

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Come to the Dank Side ; )

Category: Fun | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

come-to-the-dank-side


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Protect Your Outdoor Marijuana Plants From Wind Damage

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-plants-wind-damageIn windy areas it is a good idea to plant crops on the perimeter of your cannabis growing area closely together to serve as a windbreak to protect the other plants. Tying plants to stakes driven into the ground, or constructing a rope and stick fence, are two ways you might achieve this. The drawback of course, is that those plants will be competing with each other very intensely for soil nutrients, sunlight, and water. Another method you could use to deal with windy areas is to keep your marijuana plants clipped. This will likely limit your harvest slightly, but the marijuana plants will also adapt and become denser in their branching, hence their flowering.
 
Usually, stress inhibits the growth of the marijuana plant, or will damage the yield at the time of harvest. Intentionally underwatering around harvest is a kind of stress that  cannabis growers will use to improve on the bud quantity. Although it is wise to limit the water plants receive as you reach the harvest time, be careful not to let the marijuana plants get so dry that they wilt or burn in the sun- light. As the leaves drop off, or turn brown, the flowers that remain might resemble the resin in color and harshness of smoke. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana plants.
 
Some stresses produce far more dramatic results and are based on less credible cultivation sense. These include: splitting the base of the marijuana plant with nails, severe pruning, and bending or contorting the stem. The goal of these actions is to increase the bud quantity of the marijuana plant. Although there does appear to be a relationship between stress and bud quantity however the fundamentals of the growing process are most important. Choice of location, soil and its nutrient content, and using good seeds are far more important to yield and potency than the stresses placed upon a plant.
 
If you want to start growing, download my free grow guide and order some marijuana seeds. All top quality marijuana seeds are available in my marijuana seed shop. We ship seeds to the US, CA and many other countries. For any growing related question please visit the marijuana support page.
 

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Alpha Blue

Category: Nugs | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder

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Why Health Insurance Won't Cover Your Medical Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-insurance-companies
Patients who use medical marijuana for pain and other chronic symptoms can take an unwanted hit: Insurers don't cover the treatment, which costs as much as $1,000 a month.
 
Once the drug of choice for hippies and rebellious teens, marijuana in recent years has gained more mainstream acceptance for its ability to boost appetite, dull pain and reduce seizures in everyone from epilepsy to cancer patients.
 
Still, insurers are reluctant to cover it, in part because of conflicting laws. While 21 U.S. states have passed laws approving it for medical use, the drug still is illegal federally and in most states.
 
But perhaps the biggest hurdle for insurers is the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn't approved it. Major insurers generally don't cover treatments that are not approved by the FDA, and that approval depends on big clinical studies that measure safety, effectiveness and side effects.
 
That research can take years and millions of dollars. And while the FDA has approved treatments like Marinol that contain a synthetic version of an ingredient in marijuana, so far, no one has gained approval for a treatment that uses the whole plant.
 
As a result of the obstacles, advocates for medicinal marijuana say insurers likely won't cover the drug in the next few years. In the meantime, medical marijuana users — of which advocates estimate there are more than 1 million nationwide — have to find other ways to pay for their treatment.
 
Bill Britt, for instance, gets his supply for free from a friend whom he helps to grow the plants. Britt lives mostly on Social Security income and uses marijuana every day for epileptic seizures and leg pain from a childhood case of polio.
 
"I'm just lucky I have somebody who is helping me out, but that could go away at any time," said Britt, 55, who lives in Long Beach, California. "I am always worried about that."
 
Insurers have not seen enough evidence that marijuana is safe and more effective than other treatments, said Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America's Health Insurance Plans, an industry trade group.
 
Marijuana's Schedule I classification under the federal Controlled Substances Act makes it difficult to conduct clinical studies that might provide that evidence. The classification means the drug is considered to have a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use. And that means extra precautions are required in order to study it.
 
Researchers have to apply to the FDA to approve their study. Public Health Service, another arm of the Department of Health and Human Services, also may review it, a process that can take months.
 
The Drug Enforcement Administration has to issue a permit after making sure researchers have a secure place to store the drug. Researchers also have to explain the study plan to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, or NIDA, another agency within Health and Human Services.
 

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Abusive Skunk

Category: Nugs | Posted on Wed, May, 7th 2014 by THCFinder

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