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XJ-13 (Hybrid)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder

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XJ-13 - Hybrid

Whenever one of the Jack Herer strains (in this case, J1) are used to breed, the result is always superior. This is a classic hybrid, that is useful in helping a wide variety of symptoms and ailments. The buds are dense, almost neon-green in color and infested with tri-chromes. They give off a sour, danky, and earthy scent. When smoked, this medication hits instantly and powerfully, making it a favorite among cannabis patients in Northern California.


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Still-Divided Washington Readies for Start of Recreational Marijuana Sales

Category: News | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder
recreational-marijuana-in-waVANCOUVER, Wash. — John Larson, a recently retired high school science and math teacher, hopes to be in the first wave of legal recreational marijuana salespeople opening shop here in Washington State this week.
 
Mr. Larson, 67, who was talked into the venture by his children, said he had never tried marijuana, and, in fact, voted against legalizing it in 2012. But as a business idea — well, that’s different.
 
“If people were dumb enough to vote it in, I’m all for it,” he said over a cup of coffee near his shop here in southern Washington, just across the Columbia River from Portland, Ore. “There’s a demand, and I have a product.”
 
After nearly two years of anticipation, excitement and dread by still-divided Washington residents, the first licenses for legal sale of recreational marijuana will be issued Monday, state officials said. Sales are to start about 24 hours later.
 
But the rollout is not unfolding as anyone quite expected it to, from the seemingly unlikely businesspeople like Mr. Larson who are leading the charge to the downright odd pattern of where the first shops will open.
 
Seattle, for example, with a population of 652,000 the state’s largest city and perhaps most marijuana-friendly, will have only a single store initially, and a tiny one at that: 620 square feet, called Cannabis City. But Vancouver, about one-fourth Seattle’s size, in a largely conservative county that has tried to slow or stop marijuana businesses with strict land-use rules, could have three shops. Tacoma, also in a county that has tried to block marijuana businesses, may have four.
 
The pattern came down to chance and circumstance, said Mikhail Carpenter, a spokesman for the Washington State Liquor Control Board, which wrote the regulations and administers the system. With multiple inspections and requirements to meet, “a lot of people weren’t ready,” Mr. Carpenter said.
 
Only about 20 licenses out of 334 authorized by the regulations will be granted in this first wave, Mr. Carpenter said, with many would-be operators slowed by financing troubles, inspection questions or other issues. Mr. Larson, for example, applied for three licenses in three cities, and two were denied, in each case because state inspectors said the boundary line was too close to a licensed day care center.
 
He disagreed, but quickly gave up: “You can’t argue with the state.”
 

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Smoking weed vs. Drinking Alcohol Culture

Category: Fun | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder

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Do Cops Have To Return Medical Marijuana Plants That They Take?

Category: Culture | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder
cops-have-to-return-mmj-plantsI have many friends who have had run ins with law enforcement which resulted in law enforcement taking their medical marijuana plants. When the cases went to trial, most of these friends were acquitted of all charges. In the process, the plants that were torn out by their roots had long since died. There are cases of this happening in almost every medical marijuana state in America.
 
The victims who had their medical marijuana plants wrongfully confiscated have the right to sue to get their property back, and if it’s damaged or destroyed, to sue for damages. Per the Green Field Reporter:
 
Whether or not state laws require, as they do in Colorado, police to return medical marijuana intact if a suspect isn’t charged or is acquitted, departments have been sued over pot that has wilted in their evidence lockers.
 
In Colorado Springs, a cancer patient who had faced drug charges is suing police after 55 dead plants were returned to him. The state appeals court had to order the police to return them.
 
Medical dispensary owner Alvida Hillery sued police to return her 604 pot plants or pay $3.3 million after she was acquitted of drug-cultivation charges. She dropped the suit in exchange for a city dispensary license.
 
Police departments who take first and ask questions later should be held accountable. Taking finished product is one thing – it can be given back after trial. However, taking living, breathing plants should be a last resort, and if the cops can’t keep them alive, they shouldn’t be taken at all. It’s very difficult to put a price tag on a medical marijuana plant, so restoring the confiscation victim to where they were prior to destroying the plants is very difficult.
 

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Superman OG (Indica)

Category: Nugs | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder

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Superman OG - Indica

A very strong OG kush strain that contains a high amount of THC and CBD. An indica-dominant hybrid that will leave you feeling tired or somewhat euphoric. Great or insomnia and stress.


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Raleigh NC Passes CBD Oil Bill

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder
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Epilepsy is a terrible affliction, especially for those who suffer and are children. The amount of seizures that a child can have a day can seriously stunt the growth of the brain and development, leaving young kids unable to hold up their own heads, eat on their own, walk, or function in any way. With harsh medicine and sometimes even animal tranquilizers, it's shocking that a natural medicine like cannabis would be looked over, simply because of some negative nonsense. The plant could help hundreds of thousands of people to cope with the sadness of dealing with epilepsy.
 
For those who follow my Instagram, you'll know that I'm currently writing from the city of Raleigh, located in North Carolina. So you can only imagine the goofy smile on my face when I stumbled across the article stating that Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill, allowing epileptic patients to get CBD oil in order to treat the disorder. The North Carolina Senate unanimously voted on House Bill 1220. The bill states that hemp oil extract is now to be considered legal and regulated when a patient has tried three or more treatments and failed to respond. The oil that has been approved is derived from the Charlotte's Web strain, developed for this specific purpose of treating epilepsy in children. The strain is very low in THC but extremely high in CBD, the substance that cannabis contains that has been proven to decrease seizures to the point where the child can function normally and be almost seizure free.
 
The State Representative that suggested the bill, Pat McElraft, introduced the legislation (named "Hope 4 Haley and Friends") says that the bill isn't going to legalize medical marijuana. Instead, this bill is directed at the children who suffer. McElraft stated that, "This is only a medicine for these children so that they can develop motor skills." The Department of Health and Human Services has until October 1st to set up temporary rules regarding the registration cards for the use of the oil, as well as a database of registered caregivers, patients, and neurologists that recommend the treatment.

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