Search:
Login:
OR

Culture

8 Lies We Have to Stop Telling About Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, May, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
8-lies-about-marijuana
Legal marijuana will lead to criminals smashing through your door and stealing your money. 
 
Marijuana has no medical use.
 
Do these claims sound familiar? Drug warriors have been extremely successful in alarming America about the dangers of marijuana for decades. But where they haven't been successful is spreading accurate information about ganja to the populace.
 
Here are 8 of the top myths people tell about marijuana, and how to rebut them.
 
1. Marijuana is a gateway drug.
 
Marijuana's opponents claim marijuana is a "gateway drug" — that once someone smokes marijuana, they're much more likely to try other, harder drugs and eventually end up using something much more dangerous. There is, in fact, a correlation between marijuana use and other drugs: The National Institute on Drug Abuse claims that a person who smokes weed is 104x more likely to use cocaine than someone who never touched a joint.
 
But that's all it is — a correlation. As TIME's Healthland wrote all the way back in 2010, scientists have discarded the gateway hypothesis since the 90s. A report on the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999 said that:
 
"In the sense that marijuana use typically precedes rather than follows initiation of other illicit drug use, it is indeed a "gateway" drug. But because underage smoking and alcohol use typically precede marijuana use, marijuana is not the most common, and is rarely the first, "gateway" to illicit drug use. There is no conclusive evidence that the drug effects of marijuana are causally linked to the subsequent abuse of other illicit drugs."
 
And the majority of marijuana users never touch cocaine or heroin. In 2009, 2.3 million people reported trying pot, compared to 617,000 for cocaine and 180,000 for heroin.
 
The Marijuana Policy Project says that 107 million Americans (nearly 40% of the country) have tried marijuana, while only 37 million have tried heroin and less than 0.1% of Americans have used either in the past month. Spokesman Morgan Fox says marijuana has never been demonstrated to have any chemical component that would make it particularly dangerous and that if there is a gateway, it's because dealers have an incentive to push other illegal drugs on buyers.
 
"When you go to a liquor store for a bottle of wine, there isn't a person there trying to sell you cocaine or other dangerous products," he says. "An illegal narcotics dealer has incentive to push dangerous drugs."
 
Another study of 12th graders published in the Journal of School Health indicated that if there is a "gateway drug," there's more evidence to point towards alcohol as the culprit. A 2012 review of the evidence in Drug and Alcohol Dependence for the gateway drug hypothesis noted that 83.2% of hard drug users in Japan had never touched cannabis, while noting that the theory of a variety of gateway behaviors stood up to more rigorous review.
 
Reason's Jacob Sullum wrote that the gateway drug hypothesis' "durability is largely due to its ambiguity: Because it's rarely clear what people mean when they say that pot smoking leads to the use of 'harder' drugs, the claim is difficult to disprove."
 
2. It's as dangerous as LSD or heroin.
 
This argument is based off of the DEA's list of controlled substances, which places marijuana among "the most dangerous drugs," "with no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse." Schedule I drugs are said to leave users with "potentially severe psychological or physical dependence," and in addition to weed, that list includes heroin, (LSD), ecstasy, methaqualone, and peyote.
 
That's some pretty hefty, dangerous-sounding company. But in 2010, 38,329 people died from drug overdoses. Pharmaceutical drugs killed 22,134 people, of which opoid analgesics killed 16,651. An additional 25,692 people died from alcohol overdoses (for comparison, the CDC says that alcohol kills 88,000 a year including conditions like liver failure and drunken driving accidents).
 
But in not a single documented case has marijuana killed someone from overdose — technically, with a lethal dose that would require ingesting the THC of at least dozens and probably hundreds of pounds of marijuana or more, it's less lethal than water. Even the National Institute on Drug Abuse admits that it's "not very likely" you could overdose on marijuana, while still warning users they can experience anxiety attacks or get in marijuana-related accidents.
 
So by the most obvious metric of marijuana's danger — whether or not you can die or even be seriously injured through an overdose — the answer is plainly no.
 
Other Schedule I and even Schedule II drugs like meth and cocaine are plainly far more dangerous. That might explain why 38% of the country has tried it and walked away fine from the experience.
 
3. It's causing an epidemic of car crashes.
 
But if we were going to settle on another metric of how dangerous marijuana is — how many car crashes it causes — marijuana is still not anywhere near as dangerous as other illicit drugs. In general, the performance of drivers on THC is not impacted nearly as much as drivers on alcohol. A 2004 observational case study in Accident Analysis and Prevention found that "no increased risk for road trauma was found for drivers exposed to cannabis," while alcohol and benzodiazepines were linked to vehicular accidents.
 
There's some bad news here: a study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology that assessed 23,591 road fatalities found that the presence of cannabis in a dead driver rose from 4.2% in 1999 to 12.2% in 2010. But since THC can be present in blood for days after use, it's unclear how many drivers were actually high at the time of the accident. Furthermore, alcohol was found in over three times as many drivers — around 39.7%.
 
Additionally, car crash fatalities have been trending downwards for years. There were 51,091 fatalities in 1980, 41,945 in 2000, 37,171 in 2008, and 25,580 in 2012. So even if marijuana use has increased, American roads are still getting safer.
 
As Jenny Hollander writes for Bustle:
 
"Here's what we do know: Stoned drivers behave differently from drunk drivers. Stoned drivers are more aware that they’re intoxicated — the opposite applies for drunk drivers — and so they tend to actually drive more slowly and carefully. Therefore, drivers who are a little stoned are generally safer drivers than those who are a little drunk. As a rule, drunk driving has been understood to be far more dangerous than driving when high."
 
So while no one would advise getting high and driving, there's no solid evidence that marijuana-related traffic fatalities are a major national epidemic.
 
4. Pot smoking leads to more crime.
 
Sheriff Tom Allman of Mendocio County, Calif., had a warning for Colorado residents three months after they voted to legalize marijuana in Nov. 2012: "Thugs put on masks, they come to your house, they kick in your door. They point guns at you and say, 'Give me your marijuana, give me your money.'"
 
"Expect more crime, more kids using marijuana and pot for sale everywhere," said Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver in 2012. "I think our entire state will pay the price."
 
But Denver crime rates remained stable and in some places actually fell. (Arson was up 109% from the same period, but represented just 23 of 3,757 crimes — so if you want to blame every count on smouldering doobies, whatever.)
 
A study in PLOS One that examined states which legalized medical marijuana over the period 1990-2006 found that there were actually minor reductions in the homicide and aggravated assault rate.
 
It's debatable whether legalizing marijuana has a substantial downward effect on the crime rate. But what's clear is that looser marijuana laws have not been behind any noteworthy crime waves. And what's more, fewer people are going to jail in Colorado now that marijuana has been legalized.
 

Comments

Protect Your Outdoor Marijuana Plants From Wind Damage

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, May, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-plants-wind-damageIn windy areas it is a good idea to plant crops on the perimeter of your cannabis growing area closely together to serve as a windbreak to protect the other plants. Tying plants to stakes driven into the ground, or constructing a rope and stick fence, are two ways you might achieve this. The drawback of course, is that those plants will be competing with each other very intensely for soil nutrients, sunlight, and water. Another method you could use to deal with windy areas is to keep your marijuana plants clipped. This will likely limit your harvest slightly, but the marijuana plants will also adapt and become denser in their branching, hence their flowering.
 
Usually, stress inhibits the growth of the marijuana plant, or will damage the yield at the time of harvest. Intentionally underwatering around harvest is a kind of stress that  cannabis growers will use to improve on the bud quantity. Although it is wise to limit the water plants receive as you reach the harvest time, be careful not to let the marijuana plants get so dry that they wilt or burn in the sun- light. As the leaves drop off, or turn brown, the flowers that remain might resemble the resin in color and harshness of smoke. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana plants.
 
Some stresses produce far more dramatic results and are based on less credible cultivation sense. These include: splitting the base of the marijuana plant with nails, severe pruning, and bending or contorting the stem. The goal of these actions is to increase the bud quantity of the marijuana plant. Although there does appear to be a relationship between stress and bud quantity however the fundamentals of the growing process are most important. Choice of location, soil and its nutrient content, and using good seeds are far more important to yield and potency than the stresses placed upon a plant.
 
If you want to start growing, download my free grow guide and order some marijuana seeds. All top quality marijuana seeds are available in my marijuana seed shop. We ship seeds to the US, CA and many other countries. For any growing related question please visit the marijuana support page.
 

Comments

Meet the First Food Truck That Can Legally Get You Stoned

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, May, 7th 2014 by THCFinder
food-truck-geetting-people-stoned
Some weeks ago, Slate declared food trucks awesome and pitched ideas for other things that should be made into trucks.
 
That list didn’t include a truck that dispenses food infused with weed, but MagicalButter, a company that pulls nutrients from plants and puts them into butter and cooking oils, has created one anyway.
 
According to a press release, the Samich Truck—otherwise known as simply the Food Truck—will offer its customers “four-star-quality food items infused with 30 to 100 mg of THC” in states where marijuana has been legalized. Items on the menu include Vietnamese Banh Mi sandwiches and tomato soup—all made lovingly with weed.
 
It debuted in Denver on April 20, a pothead’s favorite holiday. Creator Garyn Angel, the CEO of MagicalButter, said the launch was a major success.
 
“It was one of the most fulfilling experiences of my life,” Angel told Newsweek. “We bought the truck on April 1, and on April 20 it went from Seattle to Denver and was ready for an opening.”
 
Angel said he’s still searching for a municipality where he can file the right paperwork to register the truck. He also has plans for a smartphone app to notify people when the 40-foot Freightliner truck is nearby and, maybe someday, a chain of restaurants.
 
Angel said he’s pretty sure the truck is the first of its kind. A van in New York last summer purported to be selling weed-infused lollipops—but that turned out to be a fraudulent claim.
 
“Our truck is not a hoax,” Angel promised. “We want to educate people about ingesting cannabis. For a lot of people, it’s a great way to balance your body. It helps with a lot of ailments.”
 

Comments

How To Avoid Weak Marijuana Seedlings

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, May, 6th 2014 by THCFinder
weak-marijuana-seedlings
Damping off is not a disease, rather a reaction to a disease. When roots, seeds and seedlings are attacked by soil born fungi, the delivering of nutrients upwards through the marijuana plant is thwarted. This results in mushy soft stems, causing the plant to fall over and die. Warm, nitrogen rich soil that is too wet provides a medium for the growth of fungi, especially Rhizoctonia and Pythium. Rhizoctonia do not produce spores; they are asexual parasitic pathogens causing plant disease.
 
Damping off begins below the soil line. As a result, the marijuana farmer will not be aware of the problem until the stalk and lower leaves show signs of atrophy. At first, the lower portion of the stalk becomes discolored, usually yellowish-brown. The stems will show brown lesions between nodes, eventually becoming dark reddish-brown cankers. The stem will turn brown and soft then it will simply fall over. Without nutrition to keep it strong and sturdy, damping off can kill a cannabis plant, or any other that has been attacked.
 
Damping off usually hits seedlings before it affects older plants. The condition can first appear as wilting, seemingly due to overwatering. However, as lesions form on the upper portions of the plant, a fungal reaction is evident. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana plants.
 
As they say, ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’. Prevention should be foremost in any gardener’s mind; especially the marijuana gardener, since there are profits at stake. We cannot stress enough the importance of moisture control. Wet soil causes ‘wet feet’, which can be the beginning of the end to your healthy cannabis crop. Water only when the surface is dry. This isn’t always possible during a rainy season, but you can help the soil from becoming saturated. Make sure the soil is well drained in order to prevent water from pooling at the root level. Adding perlite or vermiculite to the soil during preparation will help to encourage air flow below ground. When starting your crop from seed, make sure the seeds have come from disease-free specimens and plant no lower that ¼” in the ground. The moisture level lower down is more concentrated. You don’t want to set your plants up for failure from the get-go!
 
Start your seedlings indoors or in pots. Prepare the outside site properly as mentioned elsewhere in this category. Add properly cured compost (good bacteria are created during the ‘heating’ process of making compost) and let it combine with the soil at least a week before introducing plant material. Transplant your seedlings to the grow site once they have several sets of leaves. They will need their strength when transplanted so they don’t go into shock. This is advice to be taken no matter what you are growing. As an added measure, spray the soil with a copper based anti-fungal treatment, chamomile tea or garlic oil and allow it to dry-in. Always, always, always use sterile tools. Sterilize them after each use so as to kill any varmints that may have hitched a ride.
 
Once the seedlings have been affected by damping off, there is little to nothing you can do to save them. However, you may be able to help the older, stronger plants. Remove the infected areas and treat any wounds with diluted hydrogen peroxide. If the stem cankers are severe, spray with copper fungicide, clove oil, coriander oil or sesame oil.
 
So, there you have it. Mary Jane is just as susceptible to lesions, diseases and over-all ill health if you don’t give her a good strong foundation and feed her properly, as are we humans and our pets. Treat her with tender loving care, pay attention to her and you will be rewarded with a healthy marijuana crop.
 

Comments

What To Consider Before Growing Medical Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, May, 2nd 2014 by THCFinder
what-to-consider-before-growing-cannabisIt seems to be common sense that, once a state recognized marijuana as a medicine, it would then follow up by developing a system to facilitate access to those who need it the most. That, of course, has yet to happen. There are only a few states that officially permits dispensaries to sell the herb. Patients anywhere else have to depend on their own supply, a caretaker’s supply, or the black market to get their medicine.
 
Deciding whether or not you should grow marijuana or have a caregiver do it for you must be thought over carefully. The grower candidate must consider many factors.
 
Is there enough space to grow? Most gardens require a minimum of around 9 square feet (0.8 square meters). This, of course, averages out to a space that’s about 3 feet x 3 feet (0.9 meters x 0.9 meters). If growing outside, a plant can use anywhere between 4 and 25 square feet (0.4 to 2.3 square meters). Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana plants.
 
Do you feel confident in your horticultural abilities? Marijuana isn’t that hard to grow, but it can be tremendously stressful to begin a project pessimistically.
 
Do you use enough medicine to make cultivation worthwhile? If you only uses miniscule amounts of marijuana, it probably won’t make sense to waste all the time and money it requires to grow marijuana. For example, if you only go through a quarter of an ounce per month, then the effort, time, and money probably won’t balance out. Indeed, maintaining a garden could cost as much as $1,000 per year, which is an amount many people aren’t willing to part with.
 
Do you feel uneasy about growing such a controversial plant? In certain states, marijuana cultivation is legal with a doctor’s recommendation. Even in those instances, however, you do run a risk of arrest if their gardens attract adverse attention from neighbors, landlords, cops, or even unfriendly relatives and acquaintances. If you feel wary about having a taboo plant on their property, it might be a good idea to avoid a personal marijuana garden.
 
Potential growers must prepare themselves for the stark reality in which medical marijuana garners far less than benevolence from most law enforcement, even in locales where it’s technically legal. It’s wise to mentally prepare yourself for potential arrest or, at the very least, some legal hassles.
 
Gardener candidates need to also be aware that marijuana has somewhat of a seductive quality. It’s entire lifecycle, from seed (or cutting) to ripeness and senescence, spans only about a quarter of a year. One day is like a year in the marijuana plant’s life. It is also dioecious, meaning that male and female flowers grow on separate plants. Also, unlike most birds and mammals but very much like humans, the female form of the plant is prized for its beauty. It is not particularly rare for gardeners to become obsessed with growing marijuana. From my personal observations of these growers, I have concluded that using marijuana is not addictive, but growing it certainly is.
 

Comments

Classical Grass: Colorado Symphony Orchestra Teams With Weed Industry

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, May, 1st 2014 by THCFinder
weed-n-musicThe Colorado Symphony Orchestra has devised a plan to raise interest in classical music by holding a number of upcoming weed-friendly events. It may be the state's only full-time professional orchestra, but it faces the same budget concerns and diminishing audiences plaguing other ensembles. So why not exploit the state's budding marijuana business? "The cannabis industry obviously opens the door even further to a younger, more diverse audience," the Symphony's CEO Jerome Kern told The Associated Press. For the marijuana producers, Kern said, the symphony offers its legitimacy.
 
The Great Marijuana Experiment: A Tale of Two Drug Wars
 
The concert series, "Classically Cannabis: The High Notes Series," will feature small ensembles of musicians playing in a downtown Denver gallery. It will culminate with a concert at the Mile High City's vaunted Red Rocks venue. "This is a cannabis-friendly event," the Symphony's website said of the latter event. "But cannabis will NOT be sold at this event; it's strictly B.Y.O.C. (bring your own cannabis)." (Smoking pot is officially illegal at Red Rocks, though music fans have been scoffing at that law for years.)
 
A business called Edible Events Co. has organized the events, encouraging concertgoers to bring joints, baked goods or tinctures of marijuana. "We try to create upscale events where people can come and enjoy some cannabis just like they would a glass of wine," Edible Events' Jane West said. Attendees must be 21 and over and have $75 for a ticket.
 
The symphony has also scheduled a series called "Beethoven and Brews," putting classical music in hotel bars and local breweries. Tickets for those events are slightly cheaper, ranging from $40 to $65.
 
One member of the symphony's volunteer guild, Judith Inman, has expressed her reservations about the organization's new fundraising practices. "I know that the symphony needs new sponsors, and they are trying to go after a younger group," she said. "I just don't think this is the way to go about it."
 
Marijuana sales have been legal in Colorado since January. AP reports that 52 percent of state residents feel that marijuana legalization has been beneficial and 67 percent disagree with the statement that legalization has "eroded the moral fiber" of Coloradans.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
August 1, 2014 | Category: News
July 31, 2014 | Category: Nugs
July 31, 2014 | Category: Contests
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us