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Birds Can Help Protect Your Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Tue, June, 3rd 2014 by THCFinder

Oh, the wonderful majesty of the bird!  They come in all sizes and colors and have the enviable ability to soar high in the sky.  And they just may be high in the sky if they’ve paid your cannabis garden a visit before setting off into flight!

Many birds eat worms, caterpillars and other squiggly creatures, which can certainly be a help if your marijuana is plagued with the creepy crawlies.  But guess what else birds eat?  Yep, seeds!  There are even certain types of birds which have an affinity for marijuana seeds.  Many of the hemp loving feathered wonders are game birds.

Here is a partial listing of birds preferring marijuana seeds:  passenger pigeon, morning dove, bobwhite quail, ringtail pheasant, hemp linnet, magpie, starling, tree sparrow, English sparrow, nuthatch, lesser spotted woodpecker and the turtledove. Download my free marijuana grow bible to learn how to grow huge buds.

There are a few measures you can take to distract birds from dining in Mary Jane’s kitchen.  For starters, you can throw in a few scarecrows.  Or tie some tin cans, aluminum pie plates or even old CDs to a string and suspend them throughout the garden.  Or you can nail them to tall stakes interspersed throughout the crop.  Birds don’t like reflective materials. Placing netting over the plants is another way to deter birds and other critters from munching on your lovingly tendered cannabis.

Perhaps the most effective way to keep birds from dining in your garden is to set up their own exclusive restaurant and keep it stocked.  Install a bird feeder far enough away from the plants you don’t want damaged so they won’t mistake your crop as an aviary bed and breakfast.

If you want to start growing, download my free grow guide and order some marijuana seeds. All top quality marijuana seeds are available in my marijuana seed shop (buy 5 get 5 free). We ship seeds to the US, CA and many other countries. For any growing related question please visit the marijuana support page.

Source: http://www.theweedblog.com/birds-can-help-protect-your-marijuana-plants/


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The Cannabis Bars

Category: Culture | Posted on Mon, June, 2nd 2014 by THCFinder
cannabis-cafes-and-bars
Most people that are looking to have fun on a Friday or Saturday night are probably going to end up at a bar. There will probably be really loud music, a lot of drinking, and a lot of people... Which may end up leading to other issues later in the night. Some people can deal with the bars and of course, drink. Stoners, on the other hand, seem to gravitate towards the more calm places. A lot of people who smoke don't actually drink, or drink very little, leaving them to either be stuck as the designated driver when they go out or leading them to not go out at all. The cannabis industry has been taking huge strides this year, leaving many stoners hopeful for a place of their own.
 
In the legal/medicinal states, there are some places that have been springing up labeled as private clubs. These establishments cater specifically to stoners. Instead of walls lined with bottles, there are walls lined with bongs and rigs, ready to be rented, hit, and enjoyed. The bartender, rather then pouring drinks all night, checks to make sure that the patrons are using the equipment correctly and safely. And while there's music and a fun atmosphere, there's far less of a chance that you'll end up in the middle of an alcohol/testosterone fueled fight. The clubs are bring your own medicine, mostly, but there are some spots in Colorado that are beginning to push the limits.
 
The law in Colorado states that there can be no public or open consumption of marijuana, while the law in Washington states that marijuana cannot be consumed in view of the public. However, like most private clubs like Elks Lodges and such allow their customers to smoke cigars and cigarettes inside and there are cannabis clubs that are following that model. As long as there's less than three employees and the club is not open to the public, cannabis can be consumed inside of it. In Washington, the loophole would be a place having an enclosed patio or blacked out windows; as long as the public can't see marijuana being consumed.
 
For the stoners that don't like to drink and party like others, the future of cannabis cafes and bars is bright. There are hundreds of entrepreneurs that are working on getting licenses to run these sorts of businesses. As the business evolves, more shops will spring up, giving the more anti-social of the stoners a chance to get out of the house and be with other, like minded people. They won't be in an environment that makes them uncomfortable, but rather a place where they'll be able to relax and unwind, much like those who enjoy having a beer after work.

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There's More To Colorado Than Marijuana

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
colorado-and-marijuanaColorado has certainly garnered a lot of attention since voters there decided to legalize marijuana in the 2012 election, but when it comes to drug reform, there’s a lot more going on in the Rocky Mountain State than just buds, blunts, and bongs. In the past few years, Colorado has taken significant steps toward more enlightened drug policies, and with the powerful coalitions that have emerged to push the agenda, more is likely to come.
 
Passed last year while all the attention was on the legislature’s race to get marijuana commerce regulations passed, the single most significant piece of broader drug reform legislation was Senate Bill 250, which aims to rein in and redirect corrections spending by reducing the number of drug offenders in prison.
 
The bill creates a separate sentencing system for drug offenders and allows people convicted of some felony drug charges to be sentenced to probation and community-based sentencing and see that felony charge changed to a misdemeanor conviction upon completion of probation. It allow provides that savings from the sentencing changes be plowed back into drug treatment.
 
The bill didn’t come out of nowhere. It was the outgrowth of a 2008 law that created the Colorado Commission on Criminal and Juvenile Justice. That panel brought together in one effort the heads of all the relevant state agencies as they grappled with how to reduce recidivism and put a brake on prison spending. It also provided an opportunity for groups like the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition (CCJRC) to start confronting the commission with research-based evidence about what does and doesn’t work.
 
“There is a lot of good evidence-based practice that shows what we did in the past didn’t work, and a lot of it had to do with national attention,” said Pam Clifton, communications coordinator for the CCJRC. “People were asking ‘How come half your people are going back to prison?’ Well, we didn’t have funding for treatment in Colorado. If you didn’t have any money, there wasn’t any place for you to go. Another problem was helping people on the front end. How can we be more proactive with people on probation? The recession gave us a little bit of leverage.”
 
But to get sentencing and drug reforms passed required not just a commission to come up with best policies and practices, but a political leadership that was willing to act. That came in 2008, when Colorado turned from red to blue, with a new Democratic governor, Bill Ritter, and Democrats in control of the legislature.
 
“When Bill Owens (R) was governor, he wasn’t going to let anything happen,” said Clifton. “But with the commission, a lot of conversations got started and we were able to educate about why change was needed, so when we had a change in leadership, there was a mandate from the commission to get good legislation passed. A lot of the recommendations the commission made went directly to the legislature, and when a bill showed up from the commission, it had a better opportunity to survive the process.”
 

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The Colorado Symphony Orchestra staged a marijuana-friendly concert. It wasn't easy.

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, May, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-and-music
If you wanted to attend the Colorado Symphony Orchestra’s first-ever marijuana-friendly concert last week, you had to follow the rules.
 
First, you had to be one of the lucky 250 or so who scored an invitation to the event, since the May 23 brass quintet concert, the first of four “Classically Cannabis” fundraising shows in the symphony’s “High Note Series,” wasn’t open to the public. Then, you had to be at least 21 years of age and bring your own cannabis. Finally, warned a lengthy disclaimer on the Web page for the event, each of the guests who donated at least $75 to attend assumed all risk associated with using pot; concert-goers had to agree to not hold accountable “the Colorado Symphony Orchestra … and their owners, partners, employees, directors, officers, agents, affiliates and related entities” if something went horribly wrong.
 
If you were a member of the media who showed up at the large, modern art gallery hosting the concert last Friday night, there were more rules to follow—such as, according to the press advisory, not going on the gallery’s open-air patio, the only place at venue where people could actually consume marijuana.
 
“I am watching history being made!” exclaimed a gray-haired woman packing a glass pipe.
This is what happens when you put on a pot-themed classical music concert: you get a lot of rules—not to mention a lot of attention. Reporters from the  New York Times and the Times of London prowled the gallery before the show and a camera crew from CBS This Morning zoomed in on the brass quintet as they straightened the special green ties they were wearing for the event. Well-dressed patrons—many of whom were associated with marijuana-related law firms, consulting companies or similar businesses—perused the modern art on the walls, then braved the evening drizzle to grab gourmet tacos and popsicles from the squadron of food trucks stationed out back for the event. 
 

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21 Tips To Solve Nutrients Deficiencies In Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, May, 29th 2014 by THCFinder
nutrient-deficient-plants1 – Alfalfa and Cottonseed Meal
To correct nitrogen deficiencies in your marijuana garden, adding granulated products made from alfalfa and/or cottonseed to the soil provides protein which counteracts the deficiency. Pressed alfalfa hay and the remaining solids after cotton seeds have been pressed for oil act as slow-release nitrogen fertilizers when combined with the soil. Alfalfa meal or pellets are used as animal feed and is also used as a fertilizer to increase organic matter in the soil. Alfalfa contains trianconatol, which is a fatty acid stimulating growth. Cottonseed meal is high in nitrogen. However, due to the use of pesticides in cotton fields, it is imperative you use pesticide free products on your cannabis.
 
2 – Cal-Mag (Calcium – Magnesium)
As the name suggests, Cal-Mag contains calcium and magnesium, along with nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, so be careful when considering this control method. Do not use Cal-Mag during the flowering stage or the flowers will receive too much nitrogen. This treatment should be applied during the vegetative stage. Cannabis roots absorb calcium and magnesium in a proper pH level (6.5). If the pH is off, calcium deficiency can result in the forming of dead spots in the leaves, then crinkling or spotting. Follow instructions and don’t over-apply or you can end up raising the essential nutrient levels too high.
 
3 – Calcium Nitrate
This is another option for correcting calcium deficiency. It can be found at larger garden centers as a fertilizer or through scientific supply houses. Calcium nitrate contains fifteen percent nitrogen and can raise the soil pH level if needed. Again, use caution using any calcium correcting control during the flowering stage of your marijuana plant, so as to avoid providing more nitrogen than is needed.
 
Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about nutrients and marijuana plants.
 
4 – Chelated Minerals
Chelated minerals are those that have been bonded together by organic compounds and are necessary to a marijuana plant’s ability to transport oxygen and nutrients. Because minerals are inorganic, the chelating process facilitates absorption by plant life. They can be used to correct certain mineral deficiencies, while correcting imbalanced pH levels. The most common usage is liquid fertilizers targeting copper, iron, manganese and zinc deficiencies. Many hydroponic formulas contain a blend of chelated minerals. Single metal chelates are also available to address specific deficiencies in the marijuana garden.
 
5 – Compost Tea
In the beginning of this section we mentioned the importance of amending soil with compost as a preventative measure in preparing the soil for your outdoor marijuana garden. Compost is a rich source of beneficial microbes and micronutrients providing a strong immune system for your cannabis crop. Nutritious soil not only provides a healthy foundation for growth, but supplies many insecticidal and anti-fungal properties, diminishing the possibility of blight thwarting your efforts. We will discuss compost in depth towards the end of this segment.
 
Obviously, compost cannot be added to a hydroponic system, but the benefits of compost can still be obtained in the hydroponic environment in the form of compost tea. However, special care must be taken when so doing. Compost tea should be used as a foliar spray and should only be added directly in drip to drain systems.
 
Although compost tea can be applied at soil level in addition to its use as a foliar spray, we hope you are a conscientious gardener and have amended your in-ground or container grown plants with compost. As such, this particular discussion is geared towards the hydroponic gardener.
 
Compost tea is available for purchase through most hydroponic shops. They will either prepare the tea and sell it fresh, or offer kits to enable you to make your own. Or, if you have a green (brown, in this case!) thumb, we will offer a condensed version to creating this nutrient packed food source for your soil-less cannabis garden. The kits available at your local hydroponic center will come with instructions, so there is no need for this article to duplicate the information provided on the packaging. The following recipe is meant for use as a spray.
 
To make compost tea, assemble the following:
 
• 1 one gallon bucket w/handle
• Aquarium air pump with hose and bubbler attached
• 1 nylon stocking
• Organic, sterilized compost (buy at your local garden center if you don’t have a cured compost pile)
 
Fill the stocking with the equivalent of one quarter the bucket’s capacity. Tie the end of the stocking onto the handle and flip the loaded stocking into the bucket. Fill the bucket with water then place the air hose and bubbler in the bottom. Run the bubbler for a day in order to aerate the solution. When this step is complete, turn of the pump and let the tea settle. The liquid should be dark brown with no unpleasant odor. If the mixture has an ammonia scent or smells rotten, it cannot be used as a spray. Strain the mixture through cheesecloth and add to a spray bottle or add it to the irrigation water. The spray should be applied within hours of aeration or it will lose oxygen, at which point you’ll be defeating the purpose; oxygen is the conductor enabling plants to receive nutrition.
 
Spread the unused compost on the soil around your marijuana plants (any plants, not just cannabis) and work into the soil or allow it to dry in the sun and return to the compost pile for future use.
 
6 – Fish Emulsion and Fish Meal
Fish meal, which is the ground up inedible parts of fish into a powdery substance, and fish emulsion, which is the liquid remnant of fish after having been pressed for oil are effective additives available to the marijuana gardener as a correcting measure for nitrogen deficiency. The bonus with fish based treatments is the additional micronutrients they contain which aids in preventing additional nutritional inadequacies.
 
Both amenities are soil enhancements. Fish emulsion releases nitrogen to your cannabis quickly, while fish meal provides a slower, steady release. Consult your local garden center (discreetly) to see which option better serves your needs, based on symptoms.
 
7 – Granite Dust
Granite dust is a slow-release source of potassium and may contain other micronutrients that stabilize the alkaline levels in the soil. For it to be most effective, it is recommended to mix granite dust (rock dust) with a fifty percent mixture of compost. Till into the soil when preparing your cannabis bed. When added to the soil, rock dust stimulates the growth of organic matter which feeds the beneficial microorganisms. An added benefit to incorporating rock dust in your plant bed is it results in holding the soil in place and conserving water. Rock dust carries the benefit of revitalizing the soil with minerals.
 

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'Weed Fairy' Hands Out Free Marijuana Around Seattle

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, May, 29th 2014 by THCFinder
the-weed-fairy
Was she working alone, or was this a joint venture?
 
A magical creature known as the “Weed Fairy” made her way to Seattle this past weekend to flit around and give away free marijuana to “keep spirits high.”
 
This illustrious weed fairy — who we’d also dare call a goddess of ganj — is really a 23-year-old woman named Yeni Sleidi. She visits various cities to post flyers with nuggets of pot taped to them:
 
 
Originally from California, the Weed Fairy is only in Seattle for a few weeks, she told local Fox affiliate KCPQ. She has done the same thing in New York a few months back, and positive feedback encouraged her to keep it going. Naturally, though, some people are skeptical.
 
“I think people are a little worried, because this is something new, and suspicious,” Sleidi said. “But it’s real weed and it’s not dangerous. It will get you high.”
 
Since weed is legal in Washington and not New York, this time around Sleidi didn’t have to worry as much about keeping anonymous. Over the weekend, she managed to give away around 40 nuggets.
 
Read more: http://time.com

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