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What To Do To Keep Caterpillars Off Your Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Mon, July, 14th 2014 by THCFinder

The most harmful of these soft segmented pests are the Corn Borer and Hemp Borer. They eat the marrow within the stalk creating stem cankers, which weaken the plant.  A heavily infested cannabis plant can collapse.  A mere five to twelve larvae can literally destroy one plant.  Equally damaging are that the holes bored into the stems by Corn Borers leave an open door for other sap sucking bugs, resulting in the life literally being drained from the marijuana plants.  Hemp Borers attack the flowering tops.  This is one activity you want to nip in the bud right away!

Oftentimes, stem boring caterpillars are not detected until the damage has already been done because they wreak their havoc from the inside of the plant.  Examine the stems for holes with surrounding brown trails.  Chances are you have a problem if you see visible holes on your cannabis.  The only effective treatment for stem borers is to cut them out of the plant.  If the plant does not ‘come back’, make a clean cut at the base of the trail, completely removing it to ensure no further damage. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about pests and marijuana plants.

All caterpillars cause damage to cannabis plants; they love marijuana!  The caterpillars of which we can all readily recognize eat the leaves and flowers of all plants; pot is no exception.  The damage they cause is readily visible as indicated by the appearance of chew marks left on the leaves.  Introducing parasitic wasps will allow nature to take its course in eradicating caterpillars.   Chances are they will appear on their own once the presence of caterpillars is sensed.  Mother Nature has an innate sense of when to send in the troops.   Parasitic wasps lay eggs on the caterpillars’ bodies.  When the eggs hatch, the creepy crawly becomes a gourmet delight for the upcoming wasps.’

Another control, compliments of Mother Nature, is the praying mantis.  This amazing stick like bug may not thrive in all areas, but if you have them in yours, help is on the way.  Praying mantis’ eat caterpillars and will not leave the plant until it has cleaned its plate, so to speak.

You can further control the caterpillar population by applying a neem oil spray.  It is best to spray after the sun goes down or on a cloudy overcast day, as the sun renders the concoction ineffective.  Spray the tops of the plants and at the base to deter caterpillars from climbing up from the ground.  It is not necessary to saturate your plants, but coat them well.  If any caterpillars are not killed on the spot, they will die as they travel through the plant and into the path of the oil.

To make your own neem oil spray, pour 1 to 1 ½ teaspoons liquid dish washing soap to a gallon of warm water.  Add one ounce of neem oil to the container and shake well.  Pour mixture into a spray bottle.  Do not store any unused portions, as it loses its potency after four to eight hours.  Apply once a week until there is no longer evidence of the caterpillars in your garden.  Neem oil can be purchased online or at any garden center.

Of course, you can always hand pick caterpillars off your plants.  Just make sure you destroy them or they will be crawling right back onto your precious plants.

Read more: http://www.theweedblog.com


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Traveling With Weed Still Isn't Perfect

Category: Culture | Posted on Mon, July, 14th 2014 by THCFinder
traveling-with-weedThinking about taking a vacation from your state of Colorado or Washington? Possibly going back to see family or friends or maybe just getting away? If you're thinking about taking your recreational marijuana with you, you may want to think again. Even though the laws allow for cannabis to be consumed legally by people in these states, things are still a bit iffy with the TSA and the rules regarding flying with weed.
 
In Colorado, the Denver Airport has "amnesty boxes" in which people can deposit their weed before getting on a plane. The airport has a very strict no cannabis policy and the boxes serve as a place for people to avoid getting caught flying with weed by the airport security. Since the airport is so big, they are allowed to make their own rules regarding the plant. So even though you can smoke it at home, don't try to bring it on your flight!
 
Washington, however, doesn't grant the option to large venue owners to determine the rules of cannabis consumption. In the Washington airports, the security officers will be looking for weed but only amounts that surpass the legal carrying limit of 1 ounce. If there is more weed in your luggage, chances are that you'll be getting a grilling. The officers are able to call the police if more marijuana is found and the person in question could have charges brought against them if their record shows a history of drug related offenses or if they are carrying over $4,000 in cash. Individuals who have a checkered past with the law should also be weary, as even carrying less than the legal limit could make them a target for TSA officers.
 
Taking a vacation with some bud would be awesome but it's definitely something to be careful about. Be sure to research the rules of the airports you'll be at and the states that you'll be landing in. If you have the proper medical ID, you should still be aware that while the TSA claims that they are not actively looking for marijuana (their website is unclear really about what they're looking for), they will turn people over to the police that they deem suspicious.

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Cannabis Farmers Markets Are A Great Idea

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, July, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
cannabis-farmers-marketsOne of my favorite things to do is visit local farmers markets to purchase fresh, local produce and meats. In America, we moved away from purchasing produce and meat locally over the last few decades. Farmers markets are reinventing how we get food, and I personally would rather support a local farmer directly, rather than go to a chain grocery store and purchase items that I have no idea where they originated.
 
The same theory of supporting local farmers directly is now being applied to the cannabis industry. Over Fourth of July weekend a farmers market was launched in Los Angeles. The goal of the farmers market is to provide safe, reliable access to cannabis. Prices tend to be cheaper at farmers markets compared to other safe access avenues because the cannabis is being purchased directly from the farmer. There’s no third party involved other than the farmer having to pay for their table at the market. Per The Hollywood Reporter:
 
“This is an opportunity that unfortunately is not seen as much as we would like,” California Heritage Market executive administrator Paizley Bradbury said of the chance for patients and growers to interact. “We’re hoping that the California Heritage Market can bridge this gap and provide a new and affordable experience for those who need safe access they can trust.”
 
The cannabis farmers market in Los Angeles is not the first of it’s kind, contrary to mainstream media reports. There have been small farmers markets in Oregon for a handful of years now, and I have also heard of ones in Washington. But despite not being the first to do it, the farmers market in Los Angeles is still a stellar idea that I hope will be continue. I also hope to see other ones pop up all over California and beyond.
 

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Advice For Newbie Weed Buyers

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, July, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
newbie-weed-buyers
We all have to start somewhere! With legalization slowly crawling over the US as well as the rest of the world, it's possible that more people will begin to smoke weed (or not, we still aren't really sure as to what's going to happen with that). But even if you're not new to smoking, buying weed in a store for the first time might be a bit weird... So here's a list of things to pay attention to when you're going to shop for bud, according to experts in Colorado.
 
- Don't start with the strong stuff! Edibles and concentrates aren't for the weak, newbie stoner! These products are strong and have the potential to really mess your day up so if you're not used to smoking flower, don't run in to the legal stores and buy an armful of medicated Rice Krispy Treats.
 
- Ask the budtender questions! Don't be afraid, they're not going to bite! It's like asking what's the best shot of vodka to order at the bar. While you may know what you like, there may always be something better for you to try. Ask questions, learn new things!
 
- Driving out of legal states? Don't. Troopers are watching the borders of Washington and Colorado closely to make sure that people aren't taking the legal weed elsewhere. While it's okay for you to have it inside the states, as soon as you leave, it's illegal. Don't transport weed out of the legal states if you want to avoid getting caught!
 
- Just like shopping for clothes, be sure to shop around for bud prices! Some stores will have sky high prices (sometimes over $600 an ounce for top shelf strains) and others will have the same strains for way less (around $100 an ounce). If you think you may be able to find a better price, try it! You don't want to spend all of your rent money on bud, right?
 
- Keep calm! It's just buying bud! At least now, you won't have to fret over the people in the parking lot watching you buy weed from your friend. There's no more sketchy meet ups, no more freaking out about sirens chasing you on your way home. Just chill out and smoke your legal weed. Enjoy it!

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Marijuana tourists sparking up in Colorado's ski towns

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, July, 10th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-tourists-ski-and-smoke-weed
DENVER — Tourists are buying up to 90% of the recreational pot sold in some Colorado ski towns, according to a new state analysis that says those visitors are pouring tens of millions of dollars into a marijuana economy that's far larger than first predicted.
 
The study prepared for state marijuana regulators says about 9% of Colorado residents are using marijuana at least once a month, and that previous estimates dramatically under counted the amount of marijuana consumed by heavy users. The study, released Wednesday, says 22% of users consume about 70% of the pot sold in Colorado, defining a heavy user as someone consuming a gram or more a day at least 21 days monthly.
 
The study also says Colorado residents will consume about 121.4 metric tons annually, while tourists will buy nearly 9 metric tons. A study by state tax officials earlier this year estimated the market at just 92 metric tons, and a separate study released last year estimated the market at 64 metric tons.
 
A metric ton contains 1 million grams, and the average joint contains about half a gram, according to the study. A significant amount of marijuana in Colorado is being sold as either pot-infused foods or hash oil, which contain concentrated THC.
 
"This analysis suggests that the Colorado marijuana market is larger than previously thought," the study says. "When combined, total resident and visitor demand is estimated to be approximately ... 130.3 metric tons in 2014. This is a substantially higher value than reported in previous estimates."
 
Colorado has collected $34.8 million in marijuana taxes and fees this fiscal year.
 
The study notes that recreational and medical marijuana stores will likely sell only about 77 metric tons of pot this year, with the rest sold on the black or gray markets. Only a small amount is actually grown by people for their own use, the study said.
 
What remains uncertain, the study said, is how the medical and recreational markets will mature over time. Taxes on medical marijuana are significantly lower than for recreational pot, and Colorado residents can get on the state's "red card" registry for just $15. Tourists can't get those red cards, however. The study's authors noted that red card holders haven't been switching to recreational marijuana because the taxes are so much higher.
 
"The potential demand for marijuana by out-of-state visitors could represent a significant portion of total retail demand. While many Colorado residents have medical marijuana cards allowing them to purchase at a lower tax rate and at a greater number of locations, out-of-state visitors must purchase from retail marijuana vendors exclusively," the study said. "Preliminary revenue and sales data from the Department of Revenue indicate that for some counties about 90 percent of all retail sales are likely to be from out-of-state visitors."
 

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How Much Light Do Outdoor Marijuana Plants Need?

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, July, 9th 2014 by THCFinder

Marijuana is a sun-loving plant and will easily grow to large heights if provided with enough solar contact. But since marijuana is also a durable and resilient plant, growers have been able to successfully obtain buds from marijuana plants grown with only a skylight.

Sunlight encourages leaf and stem production, which in turn enables the cannabis plant to retain more sunlight, ultimately leading to more growth, larger yield and better weed. If your cannabis plants don’t receive adequate sunlight, no amount of soil and water preparation will compensate for this crucial deficiency.  Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about growing marijuana plants outdoors.

While light is necessary for growth, it is darkness that actually triggers flowering in mature marijuana plants. Once a mature plant receives a certain minimum amount of uninterrupted darkness for a week or so, this signals to the plant that the growing season has ended. The mature marijuana plant will begin to convert its energy from growing to flowering. This is why it is best to grow your marijuana plants as early in the spring as possible so that they receive the maximum amount of light, and can therefore spend most of their life cycle growing.

It is best to try and plant in a spot where your marijuana plants will receive sunlight for the longest possible period of time. Midway through the growing season, when the days are longest, the sun can be shining for 12 or more hours a day. Your goal is to find a location such as a clearing, free of trees or other obstacles that could prevent your plant’s leaves from capturing the sun’s rays and using them to power growth.

South-facing sites are usually the best in the northern hemisphere and vice versa for those in the southern hemisphere. This may not be possible for everyone due to other concerns like security or perhaps access to water. In that case make sure your cannabis plant receives at least five hours of direct sunlight and five hours of indirect sunlight each day. If you must choose between morning sun and afternoon sun then the consensus is that morning sun is best for growth.

Some northern marijuana growers experience a different problem: darkness plays a large factor in northern regions. Since the nights are short, the marijuana plants may not have enough time to flower before autumn sets in and, with it, the first frost. For these growers, being able to simulate a longer night to trigger flowering may be necessary. In this case a greenhouse or other enclosure may be the only way to grow outside. Please note that the darkness must be total as any light the marijuana plants receive, even if only briefly, will stall flowering and restart vegetative growth.

Cannabis growers near the equator or in other southerly places with long periods of darkness (more than ten hours for consecutive nights) may find that their cannabis plants flower too soon. This is a lot easier to deal with since shining light is always easier than withholding.

Read more: http://www.theweedblog.com


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