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Molybdenum Deficiency In Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, June, 13th 2014 by THCFinder
molybdenum-deficiency-in-cannabis-plantsMolybdenum deficiencies are quite uncommon, but they do have a higher incidence in marijuana strains that change colors in cold temperatures. The symptoms will start with middle leaves that turn yellow. The signs of the deficiency will move toward the shoots and younger leaves as they become twisted and curled.
 
Leaves will turn pale and have a fringed or scorched look. Their growth will also slow or look strange. Older leaves that have experienced chlorosis will have rolled margins, slowed growth, and tips that curl inward and are red.
 
It’s not uncommon to falsely think that a molybdenum deficiency is actually a nitrogen deficiency. But, molybdenum affects the middle of the marijuana plant and then moves up (making it extremely mobile) while nitrogen starts out at the bottom. Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about nutrients and marijuana plants.
 
By contrast, an excess of molybdenum may resemble an iron or copper deficiency. Molybdenum primarily works from within enzymes to help transform nitrates into ammonia. The ammonia is important for protein production, making molybdenum rather essential.
 
Obviously, it’s important to stop a molybdenum deficiency before it even starts. Products like Marijuana Booster will certainly help with that endeavor. You may also want to use a foliar spray composed of water-soluble fertilizers. To avoid over-fertilization, use a small amount of a hydroponic micronutrient mix for this task. You can use them as foliar sprays or apply them directly to the soil.
 

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Win Free Canadian Medical Marijuana For A Year

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, June, 12th 2014 by THCFinder
free-canadian-medical-marijuanaI’ve seen contests before where medical marijuana dispensaries are giving away free marijuana. However, it’s usually a small amount, and requires some type of other purchase. I just read an article about a Canadian website that is offering a contest that will provide free medical marijuana for a year to the winner.
 
The website is LiftMj.Com, which recently launched its ‘Get Happy Canada’ contest. The contest is open to all Canadians with a valid marijuana prescription. It’s also open to Canadians without a valid prescription, although a valid prescription has to be obtained by the time the medical marijuana is provided. The winner of the contest will be provided with one free gram of marijuana a day for one year. Per Reuters:
 
“Our goal at Lift is to promote the production and consumption of high quality and ethical Canadian marijuana offered at affordable prices to Canadians,” states Lift on its website. ”We want Canada to set an example for the rest of the world; to show them how marijuana can change lives and transform economies.”
 
Lift will not be supplying the contest winner with medical marijuana directly. Rather, they will pre-order and pay for one gram of medical marijuana a day from a licensed provider. The purpose of the contest is to raise awareness for Canada’s medical marijuana program ran by Health Canada.
 

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Edibles - Don't Eat the Whole Thing

Category: Culture | Posted on Wed, June, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-ediblesIn a 30,000-square-foot facility in north Denver, the 40 or so employees of Dixie Elixirs and Edibles are busy producing marijuana-infused candies, sodas, eyedroppers of sublingual Dew Drops, vape pens, massage oils, bath salts, and other marijuana goodies. In one of the facility’s several industrial kitchens, a team of hairnet-clad workers take individual chocolate Dixie Rolls from an extrusion machine and package them in swank silver wrappers. On the main factory floor, an engineer puts the finishing touches on an automated bottling line, part of the facility’s ongoing $5 million renovation project, which will soon be filling 1,000 bottles an hour with Dixie’s THC-infused “elixirs,” including flavors like mandarin, red currant, and old-fashioned sarsaparilla. Nearby, other workers fill shipping crates with the 2,000 or so products the four-year-old company ships out daily to its clientele, which comprises roughly 90 percent of all Colorado marijuana retailers.
 
When Dixie moved into this facility in early November, the ambitious expansion project made sense. Marijuana-infused food products seemed primed to be the big winner once Colorado’s new recreational marijuana industry launched in January. Edibles seemed fun, discreet, and consumer-friendly, with none of the health risks and fewer of the taboos associated with smoking pot.
 
But lately, while chief marketing officer Joe Hodas says Dixie still enjoys healthy sales, the products it sells have been generating troubling headlines. New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd dedicated her column last week to describing how she “lay curled up in a hallucinatory state” for eight hours after eating too much of a marijuana candy bar she bought at a Denver pot shop. While Dowd’s unhappy trip quickly became the stuff of Twitter hilarity, other edibles-related incidents haven’t been so funny. Colorado hospitals are reporting an uptick in emergency room visits after children accidentally eat marijuana goodies. In March, a college student from Wyoming ate a marijuana cookie and then tumbled over a railing in a Denver hotel and fell to his death. In June, a Denver woman called 911 and said her husband had eaten a marijuana candy along with pain killers and was ranting about the end of the world—not long before he allegedly shot her to death. So why is it that the kinder, gentler version of getting high has suddenly become the industry’s biggest liability?
 
Part of the problem is that while pot-infused goodies might seem like an easy way for newbies to explore marijuana use, the reality is the opposite. Colorado’s edibles industry developed over the past few years as part of the medical marijuana scene—where the clientele were anything but newbies, tolerating and often demanding a very potent product. “We didn’t have a full spectrum of demand,” explains Hodas of Dixie’s origins as a medical product. “But the market [today] is demonstrating that not everyone wants these very potent products.” It doesn’t help that, because of how it’s metabolized, edible marijuana takes much longer to kick in than the smoked version. As Dowd learned the hard way, it’s all too easy for marijuana novices to gobble up way too much of an edible before they realize just how big a dose they’ve consumed.
 

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Marijuana coffee promises different morning jolt

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, June, 6th 2014 by THCFinder
cannabis-coffeeThis cup of joe promises to give you a different sort of morning jolt.
 
A company in Washington state will introduce marijuana coffee this summer.
 
Mirth Provisions' cold brew coffee contains 20 milligrams of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, per 11.5-ounce bottle.
 
Mirth founder Adam Stites said he has been developing the marijuana coffee concept for about a year, working at first on recipes in his kitchen.
 
The product for sale will give the drinker "more of a head high, more energizing," Stites said.
 
Mirth also will sell sparkling sodas that contain THC, with flavors such as lemon ginger and pomegranate. The drinks will cost about $9-$11, Stites said.
 
Washington residents will have to wait to buy the drinks until the first marijuana retail stores open, as soon as early July. Only Washington and Colorado have legalized recreational marijuana.
 
Under Washington's marijuana edibles rules, a product cannot contain more than 100 mg of THC, and a single serving cannot contain more than 10 mg.
 
Stites said he decided to "err on the side of being conservative" with the THC dosage.
 
"We recommend people drink half the bottle, wait an hour to see how they feel, and then continue drinking the rest," he said.
 

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Sexing Your Outdoor Marijuana Plants

Category: Culture | Posted on Fri, June, 6th 2014 by THCFinder

The sex of your plants is genetically determined but is also influenced by the environment. The cannabis plant has two pairs of sex chromosomes, one of which carries the genes that determine sex. As with humans, these are either X or Y. Male plants have the XY chromosome while females are XX. In nature, each grouping has a roughly 50:50 chance of occurring per seed, but in your garden you can control male to female ratios once you learn to recognize what each gender looks like.

Identifying Females

Female marijuana flowers, which start to appear later than those of the males, look more like sacks. As they develop, two upraised feather-like stigmas will shoot out of each sack. They are usually white or cream-colored and are generally found on the main stalk at a node region. A node region is the area on a plant where a branch grows from the stem or where a branch grows on a branch. These stalks are designed to trap the pollen released by the male plant and carried along by the wind. Download my free marijuana grow bible to learn more tips and tricks for growing marijuana.

A word about Pollination If a female plant should receive pollen, it will no longer focus its energy on growing flowers, but will instead start to produce seeds. A healthy female plant can produce a lot of seeds, but unless you are trying to breed a particular type of marijuana, seed production will offer you no benefits. For this reason, growers remove male plants as soon as they identify them.

Another reason to remove the males is that this will give your remaining female plants more sun and light, and will also reduce the number of plants you are tending. Male plants are not very good to smoke, but leaving them in the ground (away from your females) is fine, because you can still use the leaves to make potent pot butter.

Identifying Males

Male marijuana plants usually start to flower one to four reeks sooner than females. They develop fewer flowers and tend to grow straight up, with flowers developing near the top. The immature first flowers (preflowers), appear at the tips of the main stem and branches. These flowers are usually closed, green, and develop in tight clusters. The main parts of the male flower are five petal-shaped objects that enclose the sex organs. They look like a tiny bunch of bananas. As it matures, each one of these clusters opens to reveal a stamen. Stamens allow the plants to produce pollen that is used for reproduction in the wild.

The best way to identify a male is by looking at the preflowers, the calyx, during the early stages of growth. If the calyx is raised on a small stalk or stem then it is generally a male. lf the calyx is not raised then it is generally a female. Watch these areas closely as they develop to learn the difference.

Removing males from your Growing Site

Uprooting male plants from the ground is one extremely reliable way to eliminate the males from your crop. Simply remove the plant and the problem is solved. The disadvantage to waiting until the males show flowers at your site is that you may not notice them until they have already released their pollen. Although a female plant can continue to flower while it is producing seeds, only the healthiest ones will succeed at doing both. Download my free marijuana grow bible to learn more tips and tricks for growing marijuana.

Read more: http://www.theweedblog.com


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Is marijuana less addictive than both alcohol and tobacco?

Category: Culture | Posted on Thu, June, 5th 2014 by THCFinder
alcohol-vs-marijuana-and-tobaccoMarijuana use, both recreationally and medicinally, is a glowing dot on the nation's political radar screen. Two states, Washington and Colorado, voted to legalize recreational use of the drug last year, and other states are contemplating following.
 
The same is true in Oregon, where as many as three marijuana-related initiatives may be heading toward the November ballot.
 
U.S. Rep. Earl Blumenauer, on his official website, makes clear where he stands. The Oregon Democrat supports legislation that would allow states to enact marijuana laws without federal interference, remove the ban on industrial hemp and "allow the marijuana industry to operate in a normal business environment."
 
Among the claims tucked under the heading "The Facts about Marijuana" is this: "Marijuana is less addictive than both alcohol and tobacco."
 
Plenty has been written about all three substances, but with Oregon possibly facing one or more pot measures on the ballot this November, we decided to see if Blumenauer is right about marijuana's addictive qualities.
 

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