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Half of Wisconsin voters support marijuana legalization

Category: Legalization | Posted on Tue, November, 19th 2013 by THCFinder
wisconsin-mj-supportIn two states last year, voters legalized recreational marijuana. One of those states, Colorado, is similar politically to Wisconsin. 
 
And yet, few among Wisconsin’s political class appear to take pot legalization seriously. If anything, it is dismissed as a wacky western idea that has no place in the heartland.
 
Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke seemed amused when asked what she thought about cannabis legalization several weeks ago.
 
“I don’t think that’s where the people of Wisconsin are at,” said Burke, who has indicated she could support legalizing medical marijuana. 
 
Gary Storck, an activist with the Madison chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), pointed out in a letter-to-the-editor that the most recent statewide poll by the Marquette University Law School showed that roughly half of Wisconsin’s registered voters support full legalization of the drug.
 
Specifically, 49.7 percent supported legalization, 44.9 percent opposed and 4.7 percent didn’t know.
 
Rep. Chris Taylor, D-Madison, the chief sponsor in the Assembly of a bill to set up a system for medical marijuana, said she is not sure where she stands on full legalization.
 
“I think there are pros and cons to it,” she said.
 

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California Posed To Legalize In 2016

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, November, 11th 2013 by THCFinder
legalize-ca-2016Since California has been at the head of marijuana pioneering for so long, it's easy to forget that marijuana isn't actually legal there. F or medical purposes, yes. But the laws are so lax that the plant might as well be allowed for everyone. I'm sure that I was not the only one surprised to see that Colorado and Washington, not to mention Portland, Maine, legalize before California. Either way, this sunny state i pushing for legalization in 2016.
 
According to polls, more than half of the California population backs legalization of marijuana. No surprise, since most people there are smoking anyways, whether or not they have a serious medical condition. But let's be honest, life is just nicer when you're smoking. Am I right? From serious afflictions like cancer to anxiety, everyone could use a little marijuana now and then.
 
Lawmakers and politicians are saying that the legalization is only a matter of time. Since the allowance of medical marijuana in California is 1996, the annual tax revenue has climbed upwards of $100 million. That's a crazy amount of money for the state. It's not surprising that everyone in California seems so happy. While marijuana legalization isn't expected to pass in 2014, people are convinced it will in 2016. It's not a matter of if but a matter of when. It'll happen eventually. Go California!

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Will Tennessee Legalize Hemp?

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, November, 11th 2013 by THCFinder
will-tennessee-legalize-hempTennessee might join other states that have removed hemp prohibition at the state level, at least that’s what one Tennessee Senator wants to see happen. Tennessee Senator Frank Niceley, a Republican from Strawberry Fields, says he is drafting a bill that legalize hemp production in Kentucky. Hemp is a crop that farmers nationwide would love to grow, especially in Tennessee. Hemp can be used to make plastics, insulation, paper, foods, clothes, and many, many other things.
 
The biggest hurdle facing hemp legalization in Tennessee is the fact that politicians don’t realize that hemp is not the same as marijuana.
 
“Their biggest fear is that, if they support hemp, people will think they support marijuana,” Niceley said, according to The Tennessean. “That’s a cousin of hemp, but cornbread is a cousin of moonshine.”
 
Hemp prohibition provides no benefit to anyone. A person can’t get high from hemp, so any money that is spent enforcing hemp prohibition is wasted. And even if one farmer can make one dollar from hemp production, considering it doesn’t harm anyone, they should be allowed to do so. To say otherwise would be bad public policy…Que the quote from reefer madness supporter Jon Lundberg, a Tennessee Representative from Bristol:
 
“On occasion, Sen. Niceley does things for political reasons more than for good policy,” Lund­berg said, according to The Tennessean. Mr. Lundberg, can you please explain how supporting farmers who want to grow hemp is not ‘good policy?’ It’s pretty obvious who is doing things for political reasons.
 

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Left And Right Media Agree: Lets End Marijuana Prohibition

Category: Legalization | Posted on Sat, November, 9th 2013 by THCFinder
end-prohibitionMainstream media has been on of the biggest contributors to marijuana prohibition. When reefer madness rolled out in the early 1900′s, incorporating the mainstream media to brainwash the American public was a favorite tactic of marijuana opponents. If the news said it was so, it was so. Nevermind science, research, or ramifications. Get the mainstream media in your back pocket and you can convince a lot of people, regardless of what you are saying is true or not.
 
Below is a brief article that NORML put out talking about the issue. How many more mainstream media outlets will come out in support of marijuana reform? Will we ever see one apologize for unfounded opposition to marijuana reform all these years? I know I’m waiting for The Oregonian to apologize to Oregonians, but I won’t hold me breath:
 
By Allen St. Pierre, Executive Director, NORML
 
One’s eyes rarely lie or distort reality. So when walking by my favorite newspaper stand in downtown Washington, D.C. last night another clear political tea leaf revealed itself about the increasing acceptance in America for ending cannabis prohibition when I spied the competing covers for the most recent editions of The Nation and Reason Magazine.
 
Both magazines are populated with interesting and though-provoking pieces about ending cannabis prohibition, the coming commerce in cannabis post-prohibition and ‘liberal guilt’ for supporting the war on some drugs.
 

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Miami Beach backs medical marijuana; is Florida next?

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, November, 8th 2013 by THCFinder
florida-marijuanaMiami Beach voters became the first in Florida to call for the decriminalization of marijuana for medical use in a Tuesday vote that gives a glimpse of statewide support for the issue.
 
The 64-36 percent approval jibed with state and national polls that show medical-marijuana support approaching 60 percent or more.
 
The non-binding straw poll — calling on the city to ask the state and federal governments to allow medical cannabis — was so popular that it garnered about 1,000 more votes than the leading candidate for mayor, Philip Levine.
 
The group People United for Medical Marijuana, which is backing a proposed constitutional amendment to make Florida the 20th pot-decriminalization state, hopes Tuesday’s Miami Beach vote reflects state sentiment.
 
“It speaks pretty positively to our chances next November,” said Benjamin Pollara, treasurer of the Orlando-based group.
 
“This was a very low turnout election in Miami Beach,” he said, “it’s a relatively old electorate, and yet it still got close to 65 percent of the vote.”
 

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Portland voters legalize marijuana

Category: Legalization | Posted on Thu, November, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
portland-voters-legalize-mjPortland became the first city on the East Coast to legalize marijuana as voters overwhelmingly passed an ordinance Tuesday allowing adults to possess small amounts of the drug.
 
With all 12 of the city’s precincts reporting, unofficial totals showed the proposal passing with 67 percent of the vote – 9,921 to 4,823.
 
The ordinance allows people 21 and older to possess as much as 2.5 ounces of marijuana. It is seen by some as another step toward legalization across the country. Supporters say they will build on Portland’s vote with a statewide legalization effort in the next two years.
 
But the immediate and practical effects of Tuesday’s vote are hazy.
 
Marijuana is still illegal under federal law, and is legal only for medical use under state law. Portland’s ordinance does not set up any legal way to obtain marijuana.
 
Police Chief Michael Sauschuck has said that, regardless of Tuesday’s vote, officers will continue to enforce state law, which says possessing as much as 2.5 ounces of marijuana can lead to a civil summons and fines of $350 to $1,000. Furnishing, selling or packaging the drug for sale can bring criminal charges.
 

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