Justices seek U.S. government's views on Colorado marijuana law

Category: Legalization | Posted on Tue, May, 5th 2015 by THCFinder
A man waves a Colorado flag with a marijuana leaf on it at Denver's annual 4/20 marijuana rally in front of the state capitol building

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A man waves a Colorado flag with a marijuana leaf on it at Denver's annual 4/20 marijuana rally in …

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday asked President Barack Obama's administration for its views on a lawsuit filed by Nebraska and Oklahoma against Colorado over its voter-approved law legalizing recreational marijuana use by adults.

The Obama administration has allowed states to experiment with marijuana legalization even though the drug remains illegal under federal law.

The high court's action delays its decision on whether the nine justices will hear the case. There is no deadline for the U.S. Justice Department to respond to the court's request.

In their challenge to Colorado's law, Nebraska and Oklahoma said marijuana is being smuggled across their borders and that drugs threaten the health and safety of children.

Nebraska and Oklahoma noted that federal law still prohibits marijuana, arguing that Colorado has created "a dangerous gap" in the federal drug control system.

Colorado stands by its law and said the Supreme Court was not the correct place to resolve the case. Oklahoma and Nebraska's lawsuit was filed under the court's rarely used "original jurisdiction" in which the justices hear disputes between states that are not first reviewed by lower courts.

Colorado voters legalized recreational marijuana use in 2012. Washington state also voted the same year to legalize recreational marijuana use by adults, while Oregon, Alaska and the District of Columbia followed suit last fall.

(Reporting by Lawrence Hurley; Editing by Will Dunham)



Puerto Rico moves to legalize marijuana for medical uses

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, May, 4th 2015 by THCFinder

The governor of Puerto Rico has signed an executive order to allow marijuana to be permitted for medical uses. Alejandro Garcia Padilla endorsed the move, which will come into immediate effect, following a lengthy public debate on the US territory.

Governor Padilla mentioned that Puerto Rico’s health secretary will have three months to file a report about how the executive order will be implemented. The order will also mean that some or all controlled substances that derive from the cannabis plant will be permitted for medical use.

"We're taking a significant step in the area of health that is fundamental to our development and quality of life," Garcia said in a statement, cited by AP. "I am sure that many patients will receive appropriate treatment that will offer them new hope."

Medical marijuana can be used to treat a number of ailments, such as helping to ease the pain associated with multiple sclerosis, AIDS and cancer. Jamie Perello, the president of Puerto Rico’s Chamber of Representatives mentioned the move was “a step in the right direction,” and added “one of the benefits that patients say they receive the most, is pain relief.”

It is not clear at present which type of illnesses will receive authorization for medical marijuana. It is also unknown whether the drug will have to be imported, or whether residents will be allowed to grow it on the island.

"There are so many questions. We have to look at all those details," Amado Martinez, an activist who supports legalizing marijuana told AP.

The possession of any amount of cannabis in Puerto Rico has hitherto been illegal and punishable with up to five years in prison and a fine of $5,000. Advocates of the reform argue that the current policy has proved ineffective in the fight against the illegal drug trade on the island.

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Iowans rally for statewide marijuana legalization

Category: Legalization | Posted on Sun, May, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

The daily pills 39-year-old Angel Francis-Kline has to take makes it hard for her to handle everyday life.

In a day, she can take between 12 to 16 pills to deal with her fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, post-traumatic stress disorder, insomnia and early on-set menopause. The combination of her pills, like Cymbalta and Hydrocodone make her uncontrollably shake and have seizures, causing dangerous situations, especially when she's driving.

"It's living everyday in pain," Francis-Kline. said. "What they're making me take is poison."

One evening, after taking a hit of hash oil concentrate, commonly known as a "dab," Francis-Kline said she safely drove back home, felt no pain for over six hours and was able to fall asleep around midnight rather than the usual 3 a.m.

That's why she, along with dozens of other marijuana advocates, rallied across downtown, and stopped at the Iowa Capitol to share stories on why the legalization of marijuana needs to come to Iowa.

"I think it's ridiculous you can't treat yourself in a natural way," Francis-Kline said.

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Hawaii lawmakers may revive dead marijuana dispensaries bill

Category: Legalization | Posted on Sat, May, 2nd 2015 by THCFinder

HONOLULU (AP) - Hawaii lawmakers are saying they might revive a bill to create a system of medical marijuana dispensaries.

The bill died late Friday when it failed to pass out of a key committee before a legislative deadline. But Senate President Donna Mercado Kim said Friday night that the Legislature may make an exception and revisit passing the bill out of committee.

“There’s an opportunity that we may extend, only for this bill, until Monday,” Kim said.

Hawaii was among the first states to legalize medical marijuana nearly 15 years ago. But the estimated 13,000 patients approved for the drug statewide have generally been left to buy it on the black market or grow it on their own.

Negotiators between the House and Senate said they could not reach agreement before a committee deadline late Friday.

Hawaii was among the first states to legalize medical marijuana, but the estimated 13,000 patients approved for the drug statewide have generally been left to buy it on the black market or grow it on their own.

“It is certainly a very unfortunate turn of events for patients,” said Rafael Kennedy, executive director of the Drug Policy Forum of Hawaii. “Many patients are already pushed to the black market by the fact that there is no legal way for them to access their medicine.”

Kennedy later said he’s happy the Legislature would revisit the bill, but he wished there was a more definitive outcome.

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51% Support Legalizing Marijuana says FOX News Poll

Category: Legalization | Posted on Wed, April, 29th 2015 by THCFinder

For the first time ever, a FOX News poll has found a majority of respondents in favor of legalizing marijuana.
The poll, released late last week, found 51% of those surveyed favor legalizing marijuana. Just 44% were opposed. Last year, a similar FOX News poll found support at 50% in favor, and 43% against. In 2013, 46% favored legalization while 49% were opposed.
The poll found that voters under 35 years old (54%) are more likely than those 65 and older (39%) to favor legalizing marijuana. Men (56%) are more likely than women (46%) to support it.
Majorities of Democrats (62%) and independent voters (53%) support legalizing marijuana, while a majority of Republicans opposes it (59%).
The findings are similar to other recent national polls released this month, and reflect a growing national acceptance of marijuana law reform.
The FOX News poll, was conducted between April 19-21, 2015. The poll sampled 1,102 registered voters nationwide, and has a margin of error of +/- 3%.


Vermont Politicians Want To Ban Alcohol Sales Until Marijuana Prohibition Ends

Category: Legalization | Posted on Tue, April, 28th 2015 by THCFinder

vermont marijuana decriminalization‘Marijuana is safer than alcohol.’ That statement has been said a lot in the last few years. It’s a statement that has been very effective in the battle to end marijuana prohibition. It’s effective because it’s true. According to a recent study, marijuana is 114 times safer than alcohol. So the fact that alcohol is legal, and even proudly consumed by many marijuana opponents, but marijuana is illegal, is a huge slap in the face to logic and reasoning.

In an effort to highlight the obvious hypocrisy that is marijuana prohibition, two lawmakers in Vermont recently introduced a bill that would prohibit alcohol sales until marijuana sales are allowed. Per The Cannabist:

Frustrated by a lack of action on marijuana legalization, two Vermont lawmakers are trying a new tack: No pot, no booze.

Progressive Rep. Chris Pearson and Democratic Rep. Jean O’Sullivan, both from Burlington, held a news conference Wednesday to announce they had filed legislation to ban the sale of alcohol in Vermont.

Both called the idea “laughable,” but said they are trying to further their arguments that marijuana is less harmful to individuals and to society than alcohol and should be legalized for adults.

The bill obviously does not have a solid chance of passing. However, it got a lot of media buzz, and I’m sure it’s got people talking in Vermont. Alcohol is very commonplace in America, and is generally accepted by most people. It’s beyond time that people realized that marijuana should be afforded that same level of acceptance and tolerance, because after all, it’s far safer.




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