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Obama States Full Support Of Medical Marijuana, Alternative Drug Treatment Models

Category: Legalization | Posted on Thu, April, 16th 2015 by THCFinder

In a CNN special to be aired on Sunday, not only will President Barack Obama state his full support of medical marijuana, he’ll also advocate for alternative models of drug abuse treatment which don’t involve incarceration.

The television special, called “Weed 3,” features CNN’s chief medical correspondent Sanjay Gupta, a neurosurgeon who came to support medical marijuana after reviewing the evidence. This time around, he’ll be delving into the politics of medical marijuana research and interviewing President Barack Obama, according to an email obtained by The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Obama has previously predicted that more states will follow the lead of Washington and Colorado in legalizing recreational marijuana, and confirmed that although marijuana is still illegal on the federal level, the Department of Justice will look the other way. 

Gupta and Obama briefly discussed the recent bipartisan bill on the Senate floor introduced by Democratic Sen. Cory Booker, which proposes to reschedule marijuana from Schedule 1 to Schedule 2.

 

Gupta wanted to know directly if Obama supports Booker’s bill.

“You know, I think I’d have to take a look at the details, but I’m on record as saying that not only do I think carefully prescribed medical use of marijuana may in fact be appropriate and we should follow the science as opposed to ideology on this issue, but I’m also on record as saying that the more we treat some of these issues related to drug abuse from a public health model and not just from an incarceration model, the better off we’re going to be,” Obama responded.

Read More:http://dailycaller.com/2015/04/15/breaking-obama-comes-around-states-full-support-of-medical-marijuana/


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Help Legalize Medical Marijuana In Texas

Category: Legalization | Posted on Wed, April, 15th 2015 by THCFinder

texas marijuana legislatureThere are serious marijuana reform efforts occurring right now. That’s not to say that there hasn’t always been a push for reform in Texas, but with momentum at an all time high, the chances of achieving reform are as strong as they have ever been. For the first time ever, there is comprehensive medical marijuana legislation in Texas and a hearing could happen as early as this month. Stand with seriously ill Texans and urge your legislators to approve safe and legal access to medical marijuana. The Drug Policy Alliance has created a great tool that helps you send a message to your Texas Senator and Representative. Below is the message – you can personalize your letter and send it at this link here:

Support HB 3785/SB 1839

Every year, thousands of Texans are diagnosed with cancer, seizure disorders, multiple sclerosis, PTSD, and other debilitating illnesses. The suffering that these patients experience is devastating for them and their families.

HB 3785/SB 1839 would allow patients the freedom to access the medicine that can best alleviate their suffering. The proposed bills would create a system in which individuals with qualifying medical conditions receive licenses allowing them to possess limited amounts of medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it. It would also establish a tightly regulated system of licensed marijuana cultivators, processors, and dispensaries to qualified applicants.

The law currently does not reflect marijuana’s legitimate medical use and denies access to patients, such as veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder and patients suffering from cancer. By continuing to deny access to patients, we limit the rights of families to seek the best possible treatment for conditions that do not respond to other drugs or therapies.

Three out of four Texans (77%) think seriously ill people should have the right to use marijuana for medical purposes, according to a University of Texas/Texas Tribune poll released in February 2014, and across the country, twenty-three states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territory of Guam have passed laws that allow people with qualifying conditions to access medical marijuana if their doctors recommend it.

Please support this legislation so that thousands of severely ill Texans, including veterans, could access the medicine they need to lead a life free of suffering.

Sincerely,
[Your Name]
[Your Address]
[City, State ZIP]

Source:http://www.theweedblog.com/help-legalize-medical-marijuana-in-texas/


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CA's 2016 Legalization Bid & Its Federal Implications

Category: Legalization | Posted on Tue, April, 14th 2015 by THCFinder

Although several states are expected to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes in 2016, there is a substantial amount of pressure being applied out West to establish a cannabis industry in the largest state in the union: California. It is there that pot proponents are currently working to develop an initiative aimed at getting the question of legalization on the ballot in the next presidential election — which, depending on its success, could be a tremendous boost for similar campaigns all across the country and ultimately lead to the end of federal prohibition.

“A lot of eyes are on California,” Gavin Newsom, the lieutenant governor of California, recently toldBloomberg. “It’s very different than almost any other state because of the scale and the magnitude of the change and what it will represent across the country.”

Marijuana activists in California believe that despite their failed efforts in the past, legalization is a lock if they can manage to get the issue on the ballot in 2016. A recent poll indicates this might be true, with next year’s election predicted to be a completely different story than in 2010, when legal weed was run out on a rail by 54 percent of the voting population. The latest data, published last month by the Public Policy Institute of California, suggests that 55 percent of the population now stands in favor of regulating the herb in a manner comparable to the alcohol industry, which is an added incentive for supporters to make good with a new proposal.

But it is going to take a lot more than a favorable poll for California to pass this type of initiative. In addition to requiring an immense team of volunteers, these types of campaigns are ultra-expensive to run and will cost millions of dollars to successfully snuff out the plague of those snidely opposing forces. However, experts anticipate that this could be easy to do, as a large chunk of the required campaign finances will likely be donated by cannabis industry figures that are already operating in legal states. Some of these businesses are more than willing to support the cause to legalize weed in California because they are champing at the bit to expand into such an enormous market.

Shockingly, however, some experts predict that it will take much more than a million and change to get an initiative passed in 2016. Troy Dayton with the ArcView Group recently told Bloomberg that it would take in upwards of $20 million in order to successfully accomplish a feat of this magnitude. This is because it will only cost about $10 million for the combined lynch mob of law enforcement, educators, and national anti-marijuana campaigners to make certain that legal weed never seen the light of day.

Read More:http://www.hightimes.com/read/cas-2016-legalization-bid-its-federal-implications


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To the Bitter End: The Nine States Where Marijuana Will Be Legalized Last

Category: Legalization | Posted on Mon, April, 13th 2015 by THCFinder

marijuana prohibition

Marijuana prohibition in the US is dying, but it isn’t going to vanish in one fell swoop. Even if Congress were to repeal federal pot prohibition, state laws criminalizing the plant and its users would still be in effect—at least in some states.

And it’s probably a pretty safe bet that Congress isn’t going to act until a good number of states, maybe more than half, have already legalized it. That process is already underway and is likely to gather real momentum by the time election day 2016 is over.

Colorado and Washington led the way in 2012, followed by Alaska, Oregon, and Washington, DC, last year. California, where one out of every eight Americans lives, is very likely to go green in 2016 via the initiative process, and so are a handful of other states, including Maine, Massachusetts, and Nevada. Longer shots next year (or even this year, in Ohio’s case) are Arizona, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio.

But just as the end of federal alcohol prohibition in 1933 didn’t mean the end of state-level prohibition—Mississippi didn’t end it until 1966, you couldn’t drink in a bar in Kansas until 1987, and dry counties remain in a number of states—ending federal marijuana prohibition isn’t going to magically make it legal everywhere.

There are two critical factors to consider in assessing how likely a state is to get around to freeing the weed: public opinion and access to non-legislative (read: initiative and referendum) political remedies.

Opinion polls consistently show stronger support for legalization in the West and the Northeast than in the Midwest and the South. But barring access to the initiative process—which only half the states have—means that even in states where public opinion strongly favors legalization, residents are going to be beholden to the legislature to get it done. Note that so far, every state that has legalized it has done it through the initiative process. That could change this year, but it seems unlikely at this point.

But even having the initiative process isn’t going to help if popular support is lacking.  That’s why some states make the list even though they have the initiative process. And even having public opinion on your side isn’t going to guarantee victory in the legislature, especially if the Republicans are in control.

Here are the nine states least likely to legalize it anytime soon and, after that, a few brief notes on a handful of states:

Read More:http://www.theweedblog.com/to-the-bitter-end-the-nine-states-where-marijuana-will-be-legalized-last/


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Texas House Committee Takes Up Three Bills on Marijuana Reform. Don't Expect Much Else.

Category: Legalization | Posted on Fri, April, 10th 2015 by THCFinder

Three bills that take different approaches to reforming Texas' marijuana laws got a hearing before the House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence on Wednesday. Supporters packed the only committee hearing scheduled on the bills in either chamber. With the clock running out on the session, other hearings aren't likely, and regardless odds are long against the Legislature passing any big changes to the state's tough marijuana laws this year.

Still, the bills, along with several others, are at least some movement on the road to Texas maybe someday allowing adults the freedom to toke without fear of arrest.

Each of the three bills the committee considered late Wednesday offers a different approach to the current demand for reform in Texas, from reducing penalties for possession to throwing the door wide open to legalization.

The first two bills, HB 325 and HB 414, seek to reduce possession of 0.35 ounces of marijuana to a Class C Misdemeanor. Currently, it is a Class B misdemeanor. They also drop possession of 2 ounces to a Class B misdemeanor and under four ounces to a Class A misdemeanor. Representatives Harold Dutton Jr. and Gene Wu from Houston are backing these bills.

El Paso Rep. Joe Moody's HB 507 takes a much larger stride in marijuana reform. It would reduce penalties for possession of less than 1 ounce to a $100 fine and no jail time.

"As a lawmaker, I have a responsibility to make sure we're spending our resources wisely and treating our people fairly," Moody said in a press release from the Marijuana Policy Project. "That's what HB 507 is about."

The bill that has most legalization advocates producing foam from their previously dry cotton mouths is HB 2165 from Rep. David Simpson of Tyler. This bill effectively legalizes marijuana with little to no regulation, like "tomatoes or jalapenos."

While critics of this bill have been quick to point out the lack of regulation could do more harm than good, Shaun McAlister, director of DFW NORML, is confident that this bill is a stepping stone to a broader version of reform.

Read More: http://blogs.dallasobserver.com/unfairpark/2015/04/texas_house_committee_takes_up_three_bills_on_marijuana_reform_dont_expect_much_else.php


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Missouri Medical Marijuana And Industrial Hemp Legislation Move Forward

Category: Legalization | Posted on Tue, April, 7th 2015 by THCFinder

missouri hemp medical marijuana

Last week was an excellent one for cannabis legalization efforts in the Missouri legislature. On Wednesday, the Senate Agriculture Committee voted 5-0 to advance SB 255, which allows licensed individuals to grow industrial hemp. Along with HB 830, this bill represents the very real prospect that Missouri could return to its rightful place as a national — or even world — leader in hemp production and processing.

A medical cannabis bill advanced in the House of Representatives, when HB 800 was approved by the House Select Committee on General Laws by a vote of 8-0 on Tuesday. It is extremely encouraging to see how much support there is for medical cannabis legislation in the legislature. However, the flaws in this particular piece of legislation are mounting.

Since the first public hearing on this bill, two amendments have been adopted. Both will limit access for patients. One restricts the amount of cannabis a patient may possess to thirty grams every fifteen days. The other eliminates symptoms such as chronic pain, nausea, and seizures from the list of qualifying conditions. So, for example, if the bill passed in current form, a person who suffered from seizures with a diagnosis of epilepsy could qualify, but a person with the exact same symptoms brought by a traumatic brain injury would not. You can read more about the committee substitute here.

It seems fairly likely that House leadership will bring HB 800 up for a vote of the full House, and, if that happens, there will be an opportunity to improve the bill through additional amendments. Please help us fight for all of Missouri’s medical cannabis patients and make our system as strong as it can possibly be. Contribute $15, $25, or $50 now to join the fight!

Source: http://www.theweedblog.com/missouri-medical-marijuana-and-industrial-hemp-legislation-move-forward/


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