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Medical Marijuana

Georgia Looks At Pro Marijuana Bills

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, December, 18th 2014 by THCFinder
georgia-marijuanaEarlier this year, Georgia tried to pass a CBD bill that would allow patients access to this healing medicine. The bill died a sudden death but advocates are hoping that a similar bill will have more success come 2015. With election season over, there are two state legislators that have turned their eyes to cannabis reform in Georgia state. 
 
 
The first bill that will be presented is quite restrictive. Rep. Allen Peake is at the head of this one. It aims for CBD only legislation and not expansive medical or retail marijuana. As for the second bill, it is led by Senator Curt Thompson. This bill proposes all out legalization and is more unlikely but still being presented. Peake’s bill appears likely to make legislative rounds and while it’s a small step, it would be a step in the right direction. 
 
 
Allen Peake had this to say about HB-1; "We had two missions, really, since the end of last session. Very simply, bring Georgia families back home — those families who have become medical refugees to seek cannabis oil in other states. Secondly, we want to establish a safe, legal, effective and timely regulatory structure in Georgia for the growing, processing and dispensing of cannabis oil. We have to find a solution inside our own borders. There are certain parameters crucial to that. It’s medical cannabis oil. It’s in a non-smokable form. It has a low enough amount of THC to be effective but can’t get you high. We want to follow the guidelines Gov. Deal has said he would (need) to consider any medical marijuana bill: Is it safe? Is it legal? And is it recommended by doctors and supervised by doctors?”
 
 
Even though the bill doesn’t actually go for the full legalization of cannabis or even medical cannabis, it would definitely improve the quality of life for some children and other patients that need the healing help of CBD in order to live normally. Most states, however, that have passed a CBD related bill don’t allow for a place to produce or obtain the CBD medicine. Peake at least acknowledges this issue and has ideas on how to get the system moving. But like most CBD bills, it is expected to have a high fail rate in the long run.
 
 
And while Thompson’s bill is more unlikely to pass, the statement that he made about it is on point; "SR 6 puts the discussion of retail marijuana regulation and taxation on the table. We have an opportunity in Georgia to regulate sales and make available another revenue stream without raising existing taxes. Several states have approved this option, and the revenue generated is so large, tax rebates to citizens are being considered. Legalizing and regulating marijuana also allows us to reduce the strain on our public safety system and jails.In 2010, for example, marijuana possession arrests accounted for over 65 percent of drug arrests in Georgia. There were over 32,000 arrests for marijuana possession in that year alone. Legalizing and regulating marijuana would free up law enforcement to focus on more dangerous drugs and save taxpayers money by significantly reducing the number of people in our state’s prisons and jails.”

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Michigan In The Top Five Medical Marijuana States

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, December, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
mi-top-5-mmj-statesA new graphic from the Marijuana Business Daily illustrates the nation’s top five medical marijuana states, as measured by public participation.
 
Created by Jennifer Mann, the graph compares states based on the number of people enrolled per one thousand residents of the state. Colorado leads all states in terms of public participation with 22.3 patients per 1,000 residents.
 
California, the nation’s oldest medical marijuana program, ranks second with  19.30, followed by Oregon (17.9) and Washington State (16.5). Michigan ranked fifth with 12.3 medical marijuana patients per 1,000 residents.
 
The US has 23 states with medical marijuana programs, not all of which are in effect yet. The Marijuana Business Daily chart considered only those states with medical marijuana programs in operation for more than one year. The national average for participation in all states qualifying for the chart was 10 patients per 1,000 residents.
 
The participation level in the Great Lakes State may be lower than anticipated, considering the maturity of the program and the size of the state. Michigan’s medical marijuana program was instituted via public vote in 2008 and the state is 9th in population nationally.
 

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Marijuana May Treat PTSD-Induced Nightmares

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, December, 15th 2014 by THCFinder
marijuana-and-ptsd-nightmaresI have a friend that suffers from sever PTSD. She was the victim of some horrific circumstances, and she has tried everything to help cope with her PTSD. The only thing that works is medical marijuana. Unfortunately, Child Protective Services frowns upon medical marijuana, even in the most extreme cases, which has resulted in her kids being taken away. She is in the process of getting her kids back, but it comes on the condition that she never uses medical marijuana again while they live in her home, which is sad. She doesn’t smoke in front of her kids, and most of the time was using tinctures. But, sadly, she has to suffer from her PTSD without help from medical marijuana in order to get her kids back.
 
PTSD is a horrible thing to deal with. One of the worst parts is the PTSD-induced nightmares. A recent study shows that medical marijuana can help with PTSD-induced nightmares. Per The Joint Blog:
 
Subjects were “followed for 7 weeks and then, following a 2-week washout period, were titrated with the other study treatment and followed for an additional 7 weeks. The modified intent-to-treat (mITT) population, which included all treated subjects that met inclusion/exclusion criteria, was analyzed.”
 
Researchers found that; “In this small sample NAB provided significant relief for military personnel with PTSD, indicating that it shows promise as a clinically-relevant treatment for patients with nightmares and a history of non-response to traditional therapies.
 
If you know someone that suffers from PTSD-induced nightmares, suggest that they use medical marijuana. It might be what they need to help cope with such a debilitating condition.
 

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Veterans May Be Getting Medical Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, December, 1st 2014 by THCFinder
veterans-may-be-getting-medical-mjThe debate to allow veteran hospitals to prescribe cannabis as a treatment has been going on a long time. While these people fight for freedom, they come home to be stuffed full of dangerous pills that sometimes don’t even work. Suffering from nightmares, absent appetites, and a multitude of other issues, the veterans who do support medical marijuana and who use it see a big difference in their quality of life. It helps them to eat, sleep, and function a bit normally after experiencing the horrors of war and the things that they’ve seen. With the introduction of the Veterans Equal Access Act, introduced Thursday by Reps Earl Blumenauer (Oregon) and Dana Rohrabacher (California) and 10 bipartisan cosponsors, the ban over veteran doctors prescribing cannabis to vets would be lifted. This would allow those vets who live in medical marijuana states would be able to go through their veteran hospitals in order to obtain medical cannabis.
 
 
“Post traumatic stress and traumatic brain injury are just as damaging and harmful as any injuries that are visible from the outside,” Blumenauer said. “Somethings even more so because of the devastating effect they can have on a veteran’s family. We should be allowing these wounded warriors access to the medicine that will help them survive and thrive, including medical marijuana, not treating them like criminals and forcing them in the shadows. It’s shameful.”
 
 
There are currently 23 states that allow the use of medical marijuana. Only 10 of those states allow doctors to recommend the use of medical cannabis in order to treat PTSD related symptoms. With nearly 30% of all vets from Iraq and Afghanistan suffering from PTSD and depression, there needs to be more done to help these people. A study done recently showed that an average of 75% reduction was shown in PTSD symptoms. “A clinical trial needs to be done to see what proportion and what kind of PTSD patients benefit, with either cannabis or the main active ingredients of cannabis,” said Dr. George Greer, who was involved in the study. 
 
 
Federal health officials heard the clamor about vets deserving cannabis and signed off on a study that would examine the effects of five different strains of cannabis, either smoked or vaporized, on 50 veterans who are suffering from PTSD. Although the study was passed, the future of it is unclear as the only providers of marijuana to the federal government didn’t have the strains required to complete the study. Additionally, the study’s lead scientist was fired from the University of Arizona where the research was scheduled to take place. Seeing as how these people fought for our freedom, we can at least give them the respect of having a medicine that works.

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Georgia Bill Would Effectively Nullify Federal Medical Marijuana Ban

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, November, 24th 2014 by THCFinder
georgia-bill-would-nullify-mmjA bill has been pre-filed for 2015 that would legalize medical marijuana in certain circumstances for the state of Georgia, effectively nullifying the unconstitutional federal prohibition on the same.
 
House Bill 1 (HB1) is scheduled for consideration next year and was introduced by Rep. Allen Peake (R-Macon). Called the Haleigh’s Hope Act, the bill would “permit the therapeutic and treatment application of cannabis and its derivatives.”
 
The federal government currently lists marijuana as a Schedule I narcotic and attempts to prohibit it for any purpose. Tenth Amendment Center national communications director Mike Maharrey says this clearly violates the Constitution.
 
“The Constitution delegates no power to the federal government to prohibit marijuana in the states. This power remains with the state governments and the people. Doubt me? Then ask yourself why it required a constitutional amendment to prohibit alcohol. There is no fundamental difference,” Maharrey said.
 
As more states take marijuana policy into their own hands, defying the federal prohibition, the federal government has become increasingly incapable of enforcing its unconstitutional prohibition. They simply lack the resources to stop the tidal wave. For those concerned about the health care and personal choices of people living in Georgia, this cannot come too soon.
 
“The last time half the states took action to nullify the federal government was in response to the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850,” said Maharrey. “This is historic, and it can continue with the passage of HB1 in Georgia during next year’s legislative session.”
 
Medical marijuana is an incredibly important issue pertaining to nullification and states rights. Because it is so overwhelmingly popular, medical marijuana can act as a metaphorical ‘gateway drug’ to the idea of state and local resistance to onerous federal laws. With this issue, it is possible to show the residents of your state that local control better serves the needs of the people than the top-down federal approach that has failed for so many decades.
 
HB1 marks an enormous step in the right direction for medical marijuana supporters and advocates of decentralized government in the state of Georgia. It signals that the public is ready to throw off the shackles of ‘federal supremacy’ and take lawmaking into their own hands.

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Marijuana Drastically Shrinks Aggressive Form Of Brain Cancer, New Study Finds

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, November, 19th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-can-shrink-aggressive-brain-cancerOver the past few years, research has revealed that marijuana can both destroy certain cancer cells and reduce the growth of others. Now, a new study in mice has found that when combined with radiation treatment, cannabis can effectively shrink one of the most aggressive types of brain tumors.
 
In a paper published Friday in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapies, a team of researchers from St. George's University of London outlined the "dramatic reductions" they observed in high-grade glioma masses, a deadly form of brain cancer, when treated with a combination of radiation and two different marijuana compounds, also known as cannabinoids. In many cases, those tumors shrunk to as low as one-tenth the sizes of those in the control group.
 
"We've shown that cannabinoids could play a role in treating one of the most aggressive cancers in adults," Dr. Wai Liu, one of the study's lead authors, wrote in an op-ed earlier this week. "The results are promising...it could provide a way of breaking through glioma and saving more lives."
 
In an email to The Huffington Post, Liu pointed out that while research surrounding marijuana's cancer-fighting properties is nothing new, his team is the first to document its effect on the disease when used alongside radiation. "The results showed that the final effect was superior to the sum of the parts," he said. "Hopefully, these results will support calls for formal trials in humans to test these combinations."
 
Liu and his colleagues examined mice that had been infected with glioma and subsequently treated with radiation alone or in combination with varying levels of two cannabis compounds: THC, the psychoactive compound associated with the "high" sensation, and CBD, which doesn't produce psychoactive side effects.
 
They found that the tumors were best treated by low doses of both THC and CBD that, when used in concert, made the tumors more receptive to radiation treatment. "Our data suggests a 'triple threat' approach using all three may be of value," Liu told HuffPost.
 
The researchers also found that together, the low doses of THC and CBD produced a similar effect to a large dose of either compound, which is noteworthy because it indicates that patients may ultimately experience fewer side effects.
 
THC and CBD are just two of the dozens of chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant. While research surrounding the therapeutic effects of these compounds has been limited, a team of scientists from the U.K. last year found that a combination of six different purified cannabinoids can kill the cancerous cells found in individuals with leukemia.
 
Meanwhile, when used alone as a form of treatment, THC has been shown to reduce the size of other cancerous tumors and stop the spread of HIV, and CBD strains of marijuana have had a profound effect on children and adults who suffer from debilitating seizure disorders.
 
Despite these findings, marijuana is still classified as a Schedule I drug in the United States, meaning the federal government believes it has no medicinal value. The federally-funded National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) grows a limited supply of marijuana in Mississippi, which is used for government sanctioned research. While critics have long accused NIDA of only funding experiments that examine the substance's negative effects, the agency has conducted a handful of studies that look at its potential benefits.
 

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