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Medical Marijuana

Autospense Marijuana Vending Machine Debuts In Santa Ana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 24th 2012 by THCFinder
First came the cupcake ATM, now we have it's nefarious counterpart -- the marijuana vending machine.
 
The self-contained "Autospense" machine by Dispense Labs was recently unveiled in Santa Ana. "I think there is a place in society for medical marijuana," company founder Joe DeRobbio told the OC Register. DeRobbio has taken it upon himself to solidify that place.
 
Each machine requires a registration card, a pin number and fingerprint recognition to be operated by a customer. Highly sophisticated security measures protect these machines from being tempered with or broken into. The medical marijuana inventory is approved by SC Laboratories.
 
Dispense Labs believes that the high business standard to which these machines are held legitimizes the current market. Autospense machines are available for rent, only to pre-qualified dispensaries.
 

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Court: Medical marijuana law doesn't OK driving under influence

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, April, 18th 2012 by THCFinder
Michigan's medical marijuana law doesn't shield people from charges if they are caught driving after using the drug, the state appeals court ruled Wednesday in another significant decision involving the 2008 voter-approved law.
 
A three-judge panel sided with the Grand Traverse County prosecutor in northern Michigan by restoring a criminal case against Rodney Koon, a medical marijuana user who was stopped in 2010 for exceeding the speed limit by nearly 30 mph. He admitted smoking marijuana six hours earlier, and a blood test revealed the drug in his body.
 
Michigan law has zero tolerance for drivers who show evidence of certain drugs, but more than 130,000 people have state-issued cards allowing them to use marijuana to alleviate pain and other symptoms of chronic illness.
 
Two courts dismissed the charge against Koon, saying prosecutors had to show he was impaired. The appeals court, however, said the medical marijuana law "does not permit all types of medical use of marijuana under all circumstances."
 
"Driving is a particularly dangerous activity," judges David Sawyer, Peter O'Connell and Amy Ronayne Krause wrote in the ruling. "Schedule 1 substances are considered particularly inimical to a drivers' ability to remain in maximally safe control of their vehicles. The danger of failing to do so affects not only the driver, but anyone else in the vicinity."
 
A message seeking comment from Koon's attorney, James Hunt, was not immediately returned. In a court filing, Hunt argued that drivers who use medical marijuana should be treated like other people who legally consume prescription drugs.
 
In another major decision last year, the appeals court said the new law doesn't allow the sale of medical marijuana through pot shops. The case has been appealed to the state Supreme Court.
 

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Historic 4/20 in Colorado: Voters Have a Chance to End Marijuana Prohibition!

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 17th 2012 by THCFinder
April 20, the quasi-official holiday for people who enjoy marijuana, is recognized by millions around the world. Those who celebrate 4/20 do so despite -- and often due to -- decades of out-dated propaganda about a plant that is objectively less harmful than alcohol. They do so despite our federal government's stubborn insistence that marijuana is one of the more dangerous substances known to man and that it has absolutely no medicinal value. People who choose to celebrate 4/20 do so amidst intense stigma surrounding the event and marijuana in general.
 
This reality will soon be on full display once again in Boulder, Colo. where one of the more prominent 4/20 events takes place on the University of Colorado campus. This year will have a deeper significance as Amendment 64 is on the ballot to tax and regulate marijuana. Amendment 64 decriminalizes marijuana regarding adult possession and opens the door for the state and local municipalities to establish a non-medical, regulatory framework regarding cultivation, distribution and sale.
 
CU administrators have drawn a dubious First Amendment-line in the sand by closing the campus to the public and threatening arrests. In spite of this, local activists plan to mobilize support for Amendment 64 this weekend.
 

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Cancer survivor says medical marijuana saved her

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, April, 12th 2012 by THCFinder
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WVLT) -- The drug debate is Nashville has been pushed back another year as legislators drop a bill that could make Tennessee the 17th state to legalize medical marijuana.
 
While cops keep fighting to keep the drug off our streets, but some of your own neighbors are fighting too -- for a prescription.
 
When stage three cervical cancer threatened to kill 50-year-old Teresa Boomer, she fought back until she was skin and bones.
 
"Morphine, three times a day, Oxycodone, Oxycontin, Lorazepam, sleeping pills, you name it, they put me on it," said Boomer. She suffered through internal and external radiation, and chemotherapy. She says the treatments led to other complications, all leaving her in unimaginable pain.
 
"Under the chemicals, the chemicals they were giving me, there was no life. There was no quality. I laid in bed, wasting. I went from 140 pounds to 87 pounds," she said.
 
And then she tried something different: a brownie laced with marijuana. She says it was like flipping a switch.
 
"The chemo and radiation, gave me back, gave me my life. And marijuana gave my life my life back to me," she said.
 
Sixteen months later, she's gained energy and weight -- and is now cancer-free. She and her husband Mark, want you to hear their story.
 
"You don't want to be looked at as a pot user or whatever but I did. And I'm proud of it, and if I wouldn't have, I wouldn't be here," she said. The Boomers moved to Tennessee recently, and joined the efforts of Tennessee NORML right away. The organization fights to reform marijuana laws.
 
State legislators heard arguments this month, but killed a bill before a vote that could have legalized pot for patients only.
 
"The state of Tennessee would have been a leader on this. It was very tightly controlled, very structured and made complete sense. It would eliminate a lot of evils that are associated with the substance," said Mark Boomer.
 
While medical marijuana won't be legalized this year, the Boomers are hopefully that it's a step in the right direction.
 
"I'm feeling really good. Feeling alive and thankful to be alive. I can walk my dog," said Teresa. She's standing up to cancer and the statehouse too.
 
"Yes, it was illegal...It saved me and it could save a lot of people."
 
Tennessee supporters say the bill will be back next session.
 

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Billboard Goes Up for Colorado Marijuana Initiative

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 10th 2012 by THCFinder
In the opening move of its election season effort to pass Amendment 64, a marijuana legalization and regulation initiative, the Colorado Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol has put up a billboard in the heart of Denver featuring a nice, middle aged woman who says, "For many reasons, I prefer marijuana over alcohol" and asks "Does that make me a bad person?"
 
The initiative, which takes the form of a constitutional amendment, legalizes the possession of up to an ounce of marijuana by adults 21 and over. Adults would also be able to possess up to six plants—three mature—and the fruits of their harvest.
 
It also calls for the licensing of marijuana cultivation facilities, product manufacturing facilities, testing facilities, and retail stores. It would require the legislature to pass an excise tax on the wholesale sale of marijuana and that the first $40 million in tax revenues each year be dedicated to the state's public school capital construction assistance fund. It would give local governments the ability to regulate such facilities or prohibit them.
 
In the most recent polling on the issue, a December Public Policy Polling survey found that 49% supported the general notion of legalizing marijuana—the poll did not ask specifically about Amendment 64—while 40% opposed it and 10% were undecided.
 
That shows that victory is within reach, but by no means assured. One of the key demographic groups needed to win is mothers and middle-aged women, like that nice lady on the billboard.
 
Colorado isn't the only state where marijuana legalization will be on the ballot. A similar effort in Washington has qualified for the ballot, while signature-gathering for initiatives continues in a number of states. Of those, efforts in Oregon and Montana now appear to have the best shot of actually qualifying for the ballot.
 

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Doc urges Bay State to decriminalize marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 10th 2012 by THCFinder
Uptight Bay Staters need to “get a grip” on their hang-ups about weed, according a doc who is a leading national advocate for the legalization of medical marijuana.
 
Dr. Donald I. Abrams, chief of hematology/oncology at San Francisco General Hospital and a cancer specialist at the University of California San Francisco’s Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, is headed to Boston this week to lecture at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. But he took time out of his schedule yesterday to lecture the commonwealth ahead of time, after learning local law enforcement is balking at a citizen initiative to decriminalize medical pot.
 
“It’s a flower. Get a grip. It’s part of nature. It should be available at sports events instead of alcohol. There’d be less violence,” Abrams told the Herald.
 
The Legislature’s Joint Committee on Public Health will hold a hearing today in the Gardner Auditorium on an initiative petition signed by more than 80,700 voters to let people with cancer, AIDS, glaucoma and other unspecified maladies possess pot.
 
Abrams is the featured speaker at Dana-Farber’s 12th annual Lenny Zakim Lecture tomorrow. While he’s been invited to hold forth on the use of natural supplements against cancer, he and Dana-Farber said yesterday cannabis is not on the agenda. But Abrams said he hopes someone asks. “Cannabis has been a natural medicine for thousands of years,” he said. “It’s an analgesic, it’s anti-inflammatory.”
 

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