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Medical Marijuana

Marijuana collective worker says pot gave him his life back

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, February, 3rd 2012 by THCFinder

Another case were marijuana is helping the lives of people!

SOQUEL, Calif. -- Boulder Creek Collective founder Marc Whitehill, a former nurse, has seen a lot of people come through his doors seeking medical marijuana, enough that he thinks he has a pretty clear idea of the patient demographic at most local dispensaries.
 
He estimates 60 percent are 40 or older and use cannabis "to avoid taking much harsher pharmaceutical alternatives to treat nausea, sleeplessness, anxiety and aches and pains," he said. They use the medicine instead of resorting to common prescription painkillers and tranquilizers.
 
Another 20 percent are youngsters with no visible signs of illness.
 
"With them, I have to trust the physician that they made the right call," he said.
 
But the last category, the 20 percent who are chronically or terminally ill receive special attention at the Boulder Creek Collective. If not for these patients, medical cannabis might not have grown into a burgeoning industry.
 
One such patient is Gary Goldsworthy, 42, who was given a free membership at the collective in exchange for volunteer hours about two years ago. Goldsworthy was diagnosed with Crohn's disease, an inflammatory bowel disorder that triggers the immune system to attack the gastro-intestinal tract, when he was 27.
 
During a long period of remission, Goldsworthy had been a successful musician who toured nationally with acclaimed blues artist James Armstrong. But an additional diagnosis of skin cancer and the removal of several lymph nodes a few years ago caused a resurgence of the Crohn's and sent him downhill fast.
 
When he first discovered marijuana as medicine, he had been housebound for more than a year, confined to his bed and the bathroom, hardly able to eat and suffering from diarrhea and intense abdominal pain, among other symptoms.
 
"I kept on getting advised by nurses to try (marijuana) because I don't get a natural appetite," he said, explaining that smoking has allowed him to regain some semblance of his former life, bringing him out of the house and allowing him to eat regularly and have more energy.
 
Against the advice of his doctors, Goldsworthy eventually decided to forgo the mainstream treatments that cost $50,000 a year, in favor of marijuana which he got for free, and which he thought did a better job addressing his symptoms.
 
"My symptoms are semi-manageable now," he said. "I was on disability and SSI but I've been able to be self-sufficient."
 
Goldsworthy now works as a part-time paid employee at the collective handling admissions. He continues to receive enough free medicine to smoke three to four times a day, around meal times.
 

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When is medical marijuana "usable?"

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, February, 2nd 2012 by THCFinder
This is a perfect example of why medical marijuana guidelines need to be set in stone instead of just having everyone stuck in a large grey area thinking they are following the law properly.
 
ROGUE RIVER, Ore. – When police knocked on Josh Brewer's door to check for marijuana, even one of the nation's most liberal medical marijuana laws was put to the test.
 
Officers were fine with the two pounds 10 ounces he and a cousin had grown, harvested, and processed. That was under the pound and a half each allowed by law. And they didn't care about the 12 plants — six each — growing in the backyard. Also legal.
 
But after they discovered the additional two pounds 11 ounces drying on coat hangers suspended from the ceiling in the living room, officers arrested Brewer, sparking a legal battle over what was enough — in the maximum sense — for medical use, and what crossed the line into the potential for illegal sales.
 
After all, even 1.5 pounds by one measure would equal 1,200 joints.
 
A motion to dismiss the case because the drying marijuana was not "usable" under Oregon law was turned down by a judge. Brewer served 60 days in jail and received three years of probation, putting him back on conventional pain pills for a wrist he said he injured in a construction accident.
 
But Brewer, 24, beat the rap and has already started a new pot garden after the state attorney general's office conceded last week that, based on a 2007 Oregon Court of Appeals ruling, the marijuana still drying on coat hangers did not qualify as ready for use.
"Without the hanging marijuana, there is no evidence that defendant possessed more than the lawful amount of 'useable marijuana,'" said the state brief on Brewer's appeal.
 
The case illustrates that 16 years after California became the first state in the nation to make medical marijuana legal, the legal questions over what is legal and who goes to jail and who doesn't are far from clear. The 15 states that allow marijuana use for medical reasons each have their own widely-varying approaches.
 
Southwestern Oregon lies at the northern tip of what is known as the Emerald Triangle, for its prime marijuana-growing climate. The region also has the highest per capita concentrations of medical marijuana growers in the state. With so much pot allowed under Oregon law, law enforcement says it's difficult to make sure that none is sold illegally.
 
"It's turned into a Cheech and Chong movie. 'Up In Smoke,' man," said Medford police Chief Tim George, whose officers arrested Brewer in 2009. "We are swimming in weed."
 

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AZ wants to make medical marijuana illegal for College students

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, February, 1st 2012 by THCFinder

Even if you have a recommendation and you want to live on campus then you better not expect to be able to take your medication. This makes one wonder if someone has cancer, ms, or any other ailements, are they not able to take their medication as well or is this just plain and simple discrimination against marijuana once again?

PHOENIX -- State lawmakers are moving today to deny university and college students living on campus the right to use medical marijuana even if they have the legally required doctor's recommendation for the drug.
 
Legislation crafted by Rep. Amanda Reeve, R-Phoenix, would make it illegal not only to use but even to possess marijuana on the campus of any public or private post-secondary institution. That would include not only the state university system and network of community colleges but also various private schools that offer degrees or certificates.
 
And that means not only keeping it out of classrooms and open areas.
 
HB2349, set for debate in the House Committee on Higher Education, also would preclude students from using the drug in dorm rooms, even if the person is drinking an infusion rather than lighting up a joint. And it would mean not having the drug among personal possession for use somewhere off campus.
 
"This is an attack on patients ... who are abiding by state law," said Joe Yuhas, spokesman for the Arizona Medical Marijuana Association. More to the point, he said the move is illegal and vowed to sue if the measure is enacted.
The 2010 initiative spells out a list of ailments and condition that qualify an adult to seek a doctor's recommendation to obtain up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana every two weeks.
 
Yuhas, whose group represents those who crafted the initiative, said the law was crafted to ban the use of the drug on public school campuses. But nothing in the voter-approved law precludes adults who have the legally required doctor's recommendation from using it elsewhere.
He said the Arizona Constitution specifically bars legislators from altering anything approved at the ballot unless the legislation "furthers the purpose" of the underlying measure. And this, he said does not.
 
The problem, Reeve said, is federal regulations governing universities require that they forbid students from having illegal controlled substances. She said schools that do not comply lose federal funding and financial assistance for students.
 
 

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Medical marijuana patients who share a joint are breaking the law -- really

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, January, 31st 2012 by THCFinder

This is just another reason the laws need to be changed up and why marijuana needs to be legalized. Hell I can share a beer or cig and no one would ever say shit, if I passed a joint to another medical marijuana patient i'm not breaking the law... what happened to puff, puff, pass?

 

For some MMJ patients, medicating with others is a chance to hang out and talk about what ails them with people going through similar problems. For others, it's a way to explore new strains they might not have tried on their own. But while this kind of socializing/sharing among patients is very common, it's also against the law.
 
You read that right. Passing a joint or handing a bowl to a fellow patient is technically illegal under Colorado's medical marijuana statutes, which clearly define what is considered legal distribution.
 
I was a guest on a recent edition of the John Doe Radio Show, a daily local Internet radio program focusing on cannabis news and activism, when the topic of patients giving other patients meds came up. At the time, I figured that passing a joint between two patients or kicking down a bowl to a friend in need was totally acceptable to do. After all, possession is protected for patients under the state constitution.
 
�But apparently I was wrong. Marijuana attorney Warren Edson, who donates space in his office for the JDR show to record, stopped in and schooled my ass on the subject: "If this is a joint and I give it to you, I've distributed it," he said. "How is that legal? How is that exchange legal?"
 
For the record: I still fully endorse the communal element of cannabis. But according to Edson, Michigan's dispensary system was set up on a patient-to-patient sales model that its courts have since ruled is against the state's medical marijuana laws -- and its rules are very similar to ones in Colorado.
 

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Medical marijuana centers in Fort Collins prepare for closing day

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, January, 30th 2012 by THCFinder
I'm sad to see so many voters decided that medical marijuana patients should'nt be able to safely obtain their medications. I guess if you have a headache the pharmacy  is fine but god forbid you have cancer!
 
Medical marijuana businesses in Fort Collins have about two weeks to clean up their affairs and close their doors.
 
A voter-approved ban on marijuana dispensaries and grow operations in the city goes into effect Feb. 14.
 
Several businesses already have closed and have had their premises inspected by Fort Collins police and state regulators.
 
Others are making arrangements to move their operations to cities that allow marijuana businesses in the Denver-Boulder area.
 
Businesses have been scheduling appointments for inspection, said Sgt. Jim Byrne of Fort Collins police. So far, the inspections have gone smoothly.
 
In some cases, large amounts of marijuana and many plants were surrendered by the businesses, he said. The marijuana was seized and destroyed.
 
Dave Watson, owner of Kind Care Colorado, 6617 S. College Ave., said he has no interest in moving his shop. Most of the business’ product will be gone by the time it closes at 6 p.m. Feb. 14.
 
“I want to stay in good standing with the city and comply with all the rules,” he said. “After that, I’m just going to lay low and see what happens.”
 

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Israeli researchers say more doctors should recommend marijuana to cancer patients

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, January, 30th 2012 by THCFinder

Time for doctors to get on the ball and start recommending medicine that really works!

More than two-thirds of cancer patients who were prescribed medical marijuana to combat pain are reportedly satisfied with the treatment, according to a comprehensive study conducted for the first time in Israel.
 
The study - conducted recently at Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, in conjunction with the Israel Cancer Association - involved 264 cancer patients who were treated with medical marijuana for a full year.
 
Some 61 percent of the respondents reported a significant improvement in their quality of life as a result of the medical marijuana, while 56 percent noted an improvement in their ability to manage pain. In general, 67 percent were in favor of the treatment, while 65 percent said they would recommend it to other patients.
 
The findings were presented earlier this month at an Israeli Oncologists Union conference in Eilat. The study was led by Dr. Ido Wolf, the director of oncology at the Sheba Cancer Center, with the assistance of researchers Yasmin Leshem, Damien Urbach, Adato Berliz, Tamar Ben Ephraim and Meital Gerty.
 
According to the study, the most common types of cancer for which medical marijuana is prescribed are lung cancer (21 percent ), breast cancer (12 percent ) and pancreatic cancer (10 percent ).
 
Researchers found that an average of 325 days passed between the time that patients were diagnosed with cancer and the time that they submitted permit requests to grow or possess medical marijuana. About 81 percent of those requests cited pain resulting from the illness. Some 8 percent of patients requested medical marijuana to combat nausea, while another 8 percent complained of weakness.
 
Most cancer patients who are currently being treated with medical marijuana are advised of the option only in the advanced stages of the illness, according to researchers. "The treatment should be offered to the patients in earlier stages of cancer," the report notes.
 
The study shows that 39 percent of respondents were initially advised of the treatment by friends, other patients or the media, rather than by their doctors. According to the study, "The treatment should be offered to patients by trained medical teams because we are dealing with an effective treatment."
 

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