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Medical Marijuana

Oregon Medical Marijuana Patient's $7,500 Settlement

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, April, 4th 2011 by THCFinder
(Register-Guard) SPRINGFIELD — A medical marijuana user who threatened to sue the city of Springfield after police ticketed him for carrying the drug into the Springfield Justice Center has instead accepted a $7,500 settlement that allows the city to deny any alleged wrongdoing in the incident.
 
By settling the case, Paul McClain gave up his right to file a lawsuit accusing Springfield police of violating his civil rights in February 2010, when they issued him a citation charging him with marijuana possession.
 
 
It’s an interesting story.  The Register-Guard reports that our medical marijuana patient went to the courthouse to work out some unpaid traffic fines.  He let court officials search his backpack and they found a “small amount” of cannabis.  He shows his patient card.  Two cops verify him on the state registry and order him to take his medicine outside the building.
 
Then our patient stashes his medicine and walks back to the building.  The cops give him a ticket for marijuana possession, even though he didn’t have his medicine on him at that time.  That’s when a state senator – Floyd Prozanski, a longtime ally of the medical marijuana movement – gets involved:
 
Police said officer Brian Antone wrote the ticket because he interpreted Oregon’s medical marijuana law as saying that state-­registered patients are prohibited from carrying the drug in a public place.
 
McClain’s case prompted state Sen. Floyd Prozanski, D-Eugene, to advise Springfield Municipal Court Judge James Strickland in writing that the law’s intent is to prohibit people from smoking or growing pot in public and “not the simple act of carrying their medicine on their person or in their belongings when in a public place.”
 
 
Our patient then writes up a tort claim with the city, claiming a 14th Amendment violation of due process because nobody ever said you couldn’t bring marijuana into the courthouse.  Really.  A two-page letter just got him out of a $500 ticket and netted him a $7,500 check.
 

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Medical marijuana bill passes Del. Senate

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, March, 31st 2011 by THCFinder
DOVER, Del. (AP) — The state Senate has overwhelmingly approved a bill legalizing the use of marijuana in Delaware for medical reasons.
 
The bill, based on the Marijuana Policy Project's model medical marijuana legislation, cleared the Senate on an 18-to-3 vote on Thursday and now goes to House.
 
The bill states that, with their doctor's written recommendation, patients with certain serious medical conditions that could be alleviated by marijuana would be allowed to possess up to six ounces of the drug from a state-registered "compassion center."
 
The state Department of Health and Social Services would issue identification cards for such patients to help ensure they are not subject to arrest. Caregivers who could pick up marijuana for their patients also would receive ID cards. Each caregiver could assist no more than five patients.
 

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Politics Ignoring Science: Federal Agency Recognizes Therapeutic Benefit of Medical Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, March, 30th 2011 by THCFinder
The federal government has maintained for decades, even over the objections of its own Administrative Law Judges, that marijuana (cannabis) is a dangerous drug with no medical value. However, something happened in March to draw attention not only to evidence of marijuana's beneficial effect on people living with cancer, but also to the government's glaring hypocrisy around the issue of medical marijuana. In fact, this hypocrisy reveals to Americans the struggle between politics and science, and makes the federal government's contradictory policies on medical marijuana that much more tenuous.
 
In March, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), one of 11 federal agencies under the National Institutes of Health, changed its website to include Cannabis as a Complementary Alternative Medicine (CAM), with possible benefits for people living with cancer. Specifically, the website read:
 
The potential benefits of medicinal Cannabis for people living with cancer include antiemetic effects, appetite stimulation, pain relief, and improved sleep. In the practice of integrative oncology, the health care provider may recommend medicinal Cannabis not only for symptom management but also for its possible direct antitumor effect.
 
NCI further stated that:
 
Cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years prior to its current status as an illegal substance.
 
Quite an admission for an agency that answers to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), which for years has steadfastly maintained that cannabis "has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States." Perhaps it was this stark contradiction that compelled NCI to recently alter its web page on medical cannabis.
 

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First federal agency to acknowledge medical marijuana removes anti-tumor information from database

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, March, 30th 2011 by THCFinder

Last week, The American Independent was first to report that the National Cancer Institute (NCI) had added a section on medical marijuana to its treatment database, making it the first federal agency to formally recognize marijuana’s medicinal properties. Now, NCI has altered the page, removing any mention of the evidence that marijuana can diminish and even reverse tumor growth.

In an edit that appeared Monday afternoon, NCI replaced a sentence about marijuana’s direct anti-tumor effect with one stating that it is prescribed mainly to battle nausea, pain and insomnia among cancer patients. The original passage, which was published on March 17, read:

The potential benefits of medicinal Cannabis for people living with cancer include antiemetic effects, appetite stimulation, pain relief, and improved sleep. In the practice of integrative oncology, the health care provider may recommend medicinal Cannabis not only for symptom management but also for its possible direct antitumor effect.

The amended version reads:

The potential benefits of medicinal Cannabis for people living with cancer include antiemetic effects, appetite stimulation, pain relief, and improved sleep. Though no relevant surveys of practice patterns exist, it appears that physicians caring for cancer patients who prescribe medicinal Cannabis predominantly do so for symptom management.

In its overview of the drug, NCI still acknowledges the following:

  • Cannabis has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years prior to its current status as an illegal substance.
  • Chemical components of Cannabis, called cannabinoids, activate specific receptors found throughout the body to produce pharmacologic effects, particularly in the central nervous system and the immune system.
  • Cannabinoids may have benefits in the treatment of cancer-related side effects.

The American Independent is awaiting reply from NCI on the reasons for the change. An image of the page as it appeared prior to Monday’s edit can be seen here.

(Source)


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Cannabis has Medical Benefits

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, March, 29th 2011 by THCFinder
Marijuana or Cannabis is an extravagance in the teenage over potato chips. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), an active component of cannabis has some medicinal effects. Cannabis contains more than 60 psychoactive compounds.
 
An Irish Physician, conducted a cannabis experiment in 1830, and used it to treat muscle spasms, stomach cramps and general pain. Then cannabis started using for medicinal purpose throughout the West.
 
China was being refined marijuana by 6,000 BC; it used as medicine around 3,000 BC in China. After 2,000 years of cultivation the drug used to make textiles in China.
 
Marijuana has been used as a medicine in India, China, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, South Africa, and South America.
 
It increases appetite and also helps in the treatments of eating disorders. The component THC prevents vomiting, and hence useful to treat patients receiving chemotherapy. It can be used to treat many other diseases including multiple sclerosis.
 

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Rules about medical marijuana in Arizona released

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, March, 28th 2011 by THCFinder
"(The patients have) been walking away with sheets of paper that they believe are certifications that we'll accept. The fact is, we will only accept certifications that are on the department-provided form," Humble said.
 
The main changes made to the final version relate to selecting and distributing dispensaries:
 
- Dispensary selection
 
The final version builds on the previous draft's proposed two-step process of approving applications. Dispensary agents will be required to first apply for a registration certificate, which would include a background check and basic information such as location. The agent then will apply for an operating license, which requires more detailed plans, such as a site plan and a certificate of occupancy.
 
ADHS has added more requirements to the first application step. For example, applicants must include a business plan that shows projected expenditures before and after the dispensary is operational, and the projected revenue.
 
The final rules make it easier for dispensary owners to change locations within their designated health area.
 
- Dispensary distribution
 
There will be one dispensary in each Community Health Analysis Area, a geographical breakdown of the state that the DHS previously used to track public-health statistics. There are 126 of these health areas in the state, close to the number of dispensaries allowed.
 
If there is one qualified applicant for one health area, the department will approve the dispensary. But if there is more than one qualified application for the same health area, prospective dispensaries will be evaluated on a set of standards: whether the dispensary has access to $150,000 in start-up capital; whether the applicant has been bankrupt; whether anyone with a 20 percent or more interest in the dispensary is a board member or a principal member; whether the applicant is a resident of Arizona for three years; and whether the applicant has outstanding fees, such as federal, state and local taxes and child support.
 
If the applicants all rank the same, the department will choose dispensaries randomly.
 
One of the reasons this provision was included in the final rules was to encourage applicants to set up shop in rural areas of the state, Humble said. If applicants do not meet the standards, they will have a better chance applying for a less competitive health area. After three years, dispensary owners can apply to move to a different health area, perhaps inside the Valley.
 

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