Medical Marijuana

AZ wants to make medical marijuana illegal for College students

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, February, 1st 2012 by THCFinder

Even if you have a recommendation and you want to live on campus then you better not expect to be able to take your medication. This makes one wonder if someone has cancer, ms, or any other ailements, are they not able to take their medication as well or is this just plain and simple discrimination against marijuana once again?

PHOENIX -- State lawmakers are moving today to deny university and college students living on campus the right to use medical marijuana even if they have the legally required doctor's recommendation for the drug.
Legislation crafted by Rep. Amanda Reeve, R-Phoenix, would make it illegal not only to use but even to possess marijuana on the campus of any public or private post-secondary institution. That would include not only the state university system and network of community colleges but also various private schools that offer degrees or certificates.
And that means not only keeping it out of classrooms and open areas.
HB2349, set for debate in the House Committee on Higher Education, also would preclude students from using the drug in dorm rooms, even if the person is drinking an infusion rather than lighting up a joint. And it would mean not having the drug among personal possession for use somewhere off campus.
"This is an attack on patients ... who are abiding by state law," said Joe Yuhas, spokesman for the Arizona Medical Marijuana Association. More to the point, he said the move is illegal and vowed to sue if the measure is enacted.
The 2010 initiative spells out a list of ailments and condition that qualify an adult to seek a doctor's recommendation to obtain up to 2 1/2 ounces of marijuana every two weeks.
Yuhas, whose group represents those who crafted the initiative, said the law was crafted to ban the use of the drug on public school campuses. But nothing in the voter-approved law precludes adults who have the legally required doctor's recommendation from using it elsewhere.
He said the Arizona Constitution specifically bars legislators from altering anything approved at the ballot unless the legislation "furthers the purpose" of the underlying measure. And this, he said does not.
The problem, Reeve said, is federal regulations governing universities require that they forbid students from having illegal controlled substances. She said schools that do not comply lose federal funding and financial assistance for students.


Medical marijuana patients who share a joint are breaking the law -- really

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, January, 31st 2012 by THCFinder

This is just another reason the laws need to be changed up and why marijuana needs to be legalized. Hell I can share a beer or cig and no one would ever say shit, if I passed a joint to another medical marijuana patient i'm not breaking the law... what happened to puff, puff, pass?


For some MMJ patients, medicating with others is a chance to hang out and talk about what ails them with people going through similar problems. For others, it's a way to explore new strains they might not have tried on their own. But while this kind of socializing/sharing among patients is very common, it's also against the law.
You read that right. Passing a joint or handing a bowl to a fellow patient is technically illegal under Colorado's medical marijuana statutes, which clearly define what is considered legal distribution.
I was a guest on a recent edition of the John Doe Radio Show, a daily local Internet radio program focusing on cannabis news and activism, when the topic of patients giving other patients meds came up. At the time, I figured that passing a joint between two patients or kicking down a bowl to a friend in need was totally acceptable to do. After all, possession is protected for patients under the state constitution.
�But apparently I was wrong. Marijuana attorney Warren Edson, who donates space in his office for the JDR show to record, stopped in and schooled my ass on the subject: "If this is a joint and I give it to you, I've distributed it," he said. "How is that legal? How is that exchange legal?"
For the record: I still fully endorse the communal element of cannabis. But according to Edson, Michigan's dispensary system was set up on a patient-to-patient sales model that its courts have since ruled is against the state's medical marijuana laws -- and its rules are very similar to ones in Colorado.


Medical marijuana centers in Fort Collins prepare for closing day

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, January, 30th 2012 by THCFinder
I'm sad to see so many voters decided that medical marijuana patients should'nt be able to safely obtain their medications. I guess if you have a headache the pharmacy  is fine but god forbid you have cancer!
Medical marijuana businesses in Fort Collins have about two weeks to clean up their affairs and close their doors.
A voter-approved ban on marijuana dispensaries and grow operations in the city goes into effect Feb. 14.
Several businesses already have closed and have had their premises inspected by Fort Collins police and state regulators.
Others are making arrangements to move their operations to cities that allow marijuana businesses in the Denver-Boulder area.
Businesses have been scheduling appointments for inspection, said Sgt. Jim Byrne of Fort Collins police. So far, the inspections have gone smoothly.
In some cases, large amounts of marijuana and many plants were surrendered by the businesses, he said. The marijuana was seized and destroyed.
Dave Watson, owner of Kind Care Colorado, 6617 S. College Ave., said he has no interest in moving his shop. Most of the business’ product will be gone by the time it closes at 6 p.m. Feb. 14.
“I want to stay in good standing with the city and comply with all the rules,” he said. “After that, I’m just going to lay low and see what happens.”


Israeli researchers say more doctors should recommend marijuana to cancer patients

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, January, 30th 2012 by THCFinder

Time for doctors to get on the ball and start recommending medicine that really works!

More than two-thirds of cancer patients who were prescribed medical marijuana to combat pain are reportedly satisfied with the treatment, according to a comprehensive study conducted for the first time in Israel.
The study - conducted recently at Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, in conjunction with the Israel Cancer Association - involved 264 cancer patients who were treated with medical marijuana for a full year.
Some 61 percent of the respondents reported a significant improvement in their quality of life as a result of the medical marijuana, while 56 percent noted an improvement in their ability to manage pain. In general, 67 percent were in favor of the treatment, while 65 percent said they would recommend it to other patients.
The findings were presented earlier this month at an Israeli Oncologists Union conference in Eilat. The study was led by Dr. Ido Wolf, the director of oncology at the Sheba Cancer Center, with the assistance of researchers Yasmin Leshem, Damien Urbach, Adato Berliz, Tamar Ben Ephraim and Meital Gerty.
According to the study, the most common types of cancer for which medical marijuana is prescribed are lung cancer (21 percent ), breast cancer (12 percent ) and pancreatic cancer (10 percent ).
Researchers found that an average of 325 days passed between the time that patients were diagnosed with cancer and the time that they submitted permit requests to grow or possess medical marijuana. About 81 percent of those requests cited pain resulting from the illness. Some 8 percent of patients requested medical marijuana to combat nausea, while another 8 percent complained of weakness.
Most cancer patients who are currently being treated with medical marijuana are advised of the option only in the advanced stages of the illness, according to researchers. "The treatment should be offered to the patients in earlier stages of cancer," the report notes.
The study shows that 39 percent of respondents were initially advised of the treatment by friends, other patients or the media, rather than by their doctors. According to the study, "The treatment should be offered to patients by trained medical teams because we are dealing with an effective treatment."


Legislators ask DEA to reclassify marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, January, 27th 2012 by THCFinder
A bipartisan group of 42 state lawmakers signed a letter asking the DEA to reschedule marijuana to a classification that could allow it be prescribed and sold in pharmacies.
The letter and a joint House-Senate resolution introduced yesterday piggy-back on Gov. Chris Gregoire’s existing petition to reschedule marijuana, which is also supported by a handful of other states. The lawmakers, like Gregoire, see rescheduling marijuana as the simplest, clearest solution to the conflict between federal prohibition of marijuana and Washington’s medical marijuana law.
“The divergence in state and federal law creates a situation where there is no regulated and safe system to supply legitimate patients who need medical cannabis. More to the point, it is clear that the long-standing classification of medical use of cannabis in the United States as an illegal Schedule I substance is fundamentally flawed and should be changed.”
Lawmakers – in the state, and in Congress – have taken this position before; Newt Gingrich in 1981 backed a rescheduling petition as a young U.S. Representative from Georgia. But it feels like a groundswell of renewed interest in reclassification and legalization from the less-than-usual suspects.
A hearing on the resolution is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. Feb. 2 in the Senate Health and Long-term Care committee.


Medical marijuana helped cancer patient improve

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, January, 27th 2012 by THCFinder
I don’t understand why New Jersey doesn’t look at states with successful medical marijuana programs for help with initiating the programs here.
Oregon is one such state. My sister lives in Oregon, and was diagnosed with multiple myeloma last spring. Her appetite diminished to nothing. She lost 60 pounds and was in danger of dying, not from her cancer but from malnutrition.
Medical marijuana helped her regain some appetite. As she grew stronger, her cancer went into remission. She was able to tolerate treatments and use less pain medication.
Marinol, the synthetic form of marijuana, did not work for her. My sister is 69, not a pot-smoking junkie as portrayed in the movies of earlier times that convinced many — obviously our governor is one — of the evils of marijuana.
Marijuana deserves its place in the pharmacology for treatment to patients who need it. In order for them to get it, someone must be allowed to grow and sell it.
Shame on our federal government for not stepping in and making this happen. Shame on our state for pretending to be helping while throwing up roadblocks.
Support the growth and sale, and hope you and yours never need it.



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