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Medical Marijuana

Seven Terpenes Found In Cannabis

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, August, 18th 2014 by THCFinder

seven-terpens-in-cannabis

The first thought in your head is probably "what the hell is a terpene?" Fair question. Terpenes are a widespread group of what's called organic hydro carbons and are produced by many plants that we find in the world today. Also, there are terpenoids that are terpenes that have been chemically modified. This chemically modified group includes the cannabinoids. When you light the plants on fire, this causes the chemical reaction, leading the plant to cause an effect on the person that is inhaling.

Effects of the terpenes and terpenoids to animals vary but are widespread and extremely positive. From characteristics like anti-microbial, anti-oxident, anti-carcinogenic, painkillers, muscle relaxers, anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety and in the case of our favorite plant, psychoactive, terpenes are definitely an asset... For the most part. It's important to be aware that there are some poisons ones out there that act as natural pest control but can also be dangerous to pets, such as the poison hemlock tree.

In cannabis alone, there are 120 different kinds of terpenes. The levels of each one varies, from just a little bit found to a whole lot. The terpenes are located in the trichomes, which is also the spot where the THC resides. The trichomes give weed that glittery shiny look that stoners love so much and also harbor the psychoactive ingredients that are needed to achieve pothead bliss. For those of you that grow, this is why harvest should happen early in the morning! As the day goes on and light/heat increase, there are more and more terpenes being vaporized by the sun. Here are seven of the 120 terpenes that are found in the cannabis plant.

1. Caryophyllene gives off a spicy yet sweet aroma that could also be called woodsy, maybe with a hint of pepper. It's a very homey smell that permeates some buds and once you crack them open, you get a whiff of what smells like a secluded little cabin tucked away in the woods of Colorado somewhere. It's definitely a great smell. In addition, it can be used topically in clove oil to assist with inflammation as well as a treatment for toothache. Caryophyllene is also the terpene that drug dogs are taught to smell for, since THC doesn't actually smell like anything.

2. Borneol is very menthol, laced with traces of camphor and pine. Borneol is found primarily in cinnamon and wormwood and is used as a calming sedative in Chinese medicine. The borneol terpene is directed to assist with recovery and fatigue, improving the energy of the user.

3. Limonene resembles that citrus smell, which is definitely craved in the pothead community. Weed that smells like fruit? Hell yeah. Limonene is what causes this with it's lemon/lime/orange scent. With a slight hint of peppermint as well, limonene repels predators and is what is found in the rinds of citrus fruits, among others. When paired with other terpenes, limonene becomes anti-bacterial and can also fight off fungus, cancer causing agents, and depression. It also promotes the absorption of other terpenes in to the body by allowing them to quickly penetrate cell membranes. One more thing? This terpene may be the reason that physically smoking marijuana doesn't cause cancerous problems in the lungs.

4. Myrcene is very earthy and resembles cloves but also with a tropical mango-ish scent. This makes a lot of sense, as Myrcene can also make the smoker more high if ingested prior to the session. It is suggested that you ingest a mango one hour prior to smoking to get the best experience possible from your weed.

5. Delta3Carene is used a lot in aroma therapy to dry excess liquid such as tears, runny noses, perspiration, and menstrual cycles. It smells sweet and piney, something definitely comforting. This terpene is what causes the dry eyes/dry mouth (cottonmouth) that some stoner experience after smoking.

6. Cineole/Eucalyptol smells of spicy mint but leaves you feeling pretty refreshed. Thought to be the cause of the cannabis creativity effect, cineole and eucalyptol are used to increase circulation and pain relief. It is fast acting, crossing the blood brain barrier to trigger a response in the brain faster than other terpenes.

7. Linalool smells of lily, citrus, and candied spice. This terpene is the calming effect of cannabis, giving the user the sedative and anti-anxiety effects that are so sought after in cannabis consumption. This effect is also cause by lavender.


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Parents Desperately Seek Medical Marijuana for Kids

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, July, 29th 2014 by THCFinder
parents-seek-medical-cannabis-for-kidsCalifornia has the oldest and most liberal compassionate care law among the 23 states plus Washington, D.C. that allow the use of medical marijuana. So why are the state's youngest -- and arguably most needy --patients not getting it?
"Charlotte's Web" is a marijuana strain that won't get you high, but parents say it has had a profound effect on the lives of many children who suffer severe seizures.
 
At 8-months-old, Oceanside infant Connor Dalby began seizing 50 to 75 times a day.
 
“There was no joy. There was no smile. There was no laugh,” Connor’s father Randy Dalby said.
 
Near Chula Vista, the Benavides family was struggling with their son Robby. Robby’s multiple "drop attack" type seizures came without warning at a similar daily rate.
 
“He loses all muscle tone and just falls, falls hard to the ground. He’s had stitches on his eye, even bit off his tongue,” Robby’s mother Allison Benavides said.
 
Both families say they tried every mainstream medicine drug treatment and every combination available. Nothing worked.
 
Somehow, Charlotte's Web Oil, made from a marijuana strain of the same name, has changed their lives.
 
“My son is seizure free. He is four months seizure free today,” Benavides said.
 
Dalby recorded Connor sitting up on his own for the first time just a few months ago.
 
“We're watching a miracle. We have almost lost him a couple times,” Dalby said.
 
The Dalbys and Benavides get Charlotte's Web through the California Chapter of the "Realm of Caring."
 

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Majority Support For Medical Marijuana In Australia

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, July, 29th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-support-in-australia
A new poll is out in Australia which shows that an overwhelming majority of Australians support medical marijuana. Per The Standard:
 
Almost two-thirds of Australians support the legalisation of cannabis for medicinal purposes, according to a new poll which coincides with a renewed push to relax the laws.
 
A ReachTel survey of more than 3400 Australians shows that the majority back medicinal marijuana, with support highest among 51 to 65-year-olds.
 
The survey was released the same week that NSW Premier Mike Baird indicated that he supports medical marijuana. To be fair, Mr. Baird also indicated some concerns about supply and regulation, but those are issues that can be easily worked out if the Premier is indeed open to the idea. Medical marijuana opponents in Australia are clinging to the ‘we need more research’ argument, which is one of my pet peeves. For starters, there’s overwhelming evidence and research already out there. And secondly, if opponents truly want more research, then they need to allow it, instead of acting like they want it, but then do everything they can to prevent it.
 

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Florida voters back medical marijuana 9 to 1

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, July, 28th 2014 by THCFinder
florida-mmj
If the latest poll is right, it’s a safe bet that Florida will legalize medical marijuana this November.
 
A new Quinnipiac University poll finds that 88 percent of voters support the legal use of marijuana for medical purposes, while 10 percent do not. Those attitudes were unchanged from May, but support was six percentage points up from November. The lowest level of support was among senior citizens, who still back the measure roughly 6 to 1. The youngest segment of voters backed it 19 to 1.
 
A ballot measure that would legalize the drug was narrowly approved in January, which means that voters will have the chance in just a few months to add their state to a growing number with legal medical pot, which seems likely given the poll.
 
Among all demographic groups, support for medical marijuana was lowest among Republicans, 80 percent of whom support legalization with 19 percent opposing.
 
When asked whether they would support a legal medical marijuana dispensary in their own town or city, 71 percent of voters said yes while 26 percent said no. Support for a dispensary in one’s own town was lowest among seniors, who still backed the idea 57 percent to 37 percent.
 
A majority of voters even supported legalizing marijuana simply for recreational use. The only demographic groups where majorities opposed the idea were Republicans and seniors. Overall support for recreational legalization was up seven percentage points from November.
 
There was a 23-point different in support between Democrats, who support recreational pot roughly 2 to 1, and Republicans. Support among men was 61 percent, a dozen points higher than that for women.
 
 
When asked confidentially, 44 percent said they’ve tried the drug. Seniors had the far and away lowest rates of trying pot, at 23 percent.
 

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Florida's medical marijuana proposal: Five things to know about Amendment 2

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, July, 25th 2014 by THCFinder
fl-mmj-proposal1) Nobody will be buying or selling pot until late 2015 or early 2016
 
Amendment 2 gives the Florida Department of Health until early July to establish regulations to make the system work. The department then has until early October to license the first Medical Treatment Centers. Until then, no one can start growing, much less selling. The first harvest might not come in until late 2015 or beyond. Regulations may forbid Treatment Centers from importing pot from other states or countries for resale. And even if Florida does allow that, postal regulations. airline rules and state laws probably would make importation impractical. Imagine a truck full of pot driving from Colorado to Florida. If it gets stopped in Arkansas, authorities will not care that the pot is legal in both Colorado and Florida. Buyers probably will have to await the first harvest.
 
2) The regulations will fill in many missing details
 
The amendment does not address the sale of medical marijuana to minors. The regulations will probably mimic other states and require parental consent, but those regulations remain to be drafted. Regulators will also decide whether caregivers can have criminal records, how much pot a patient could possess, whether Florida will honor a medical marijuana card from another state and dozens of other details. The amendment foresees that regulators will establish Treatment Center licensing fees and procedures, as well as rules about security, inventory control, testing and inspections. Local zoning laws could also come into play.
 
3) Some issues are spelled out in the amendment
 
The amendment specifically states that driving a car or boat under the influence of marijuana would remain illegal. Marijuana could still be banned from workplaces, schools and public spaces. No insurance company or government agency can be forced to cover the cost of medical marijuana.
 
4) Regulations must be "reasonable" and ensure the "availability and safe use"
 
These two phrases in the amendment could determine the outcome of any court fights over regulations or any new laws passed by the Legislature. If the Department of Health issues regulations that are too strict — say limiting counties to only one dispensary — then any citizen could sue, arguing that the regulation is unreasonable and does not ensure availability. The same would apply to new legislation that tried to restrict the system unreasonably. The amendment puts medical marijuana into the Florida Constitution, which would take precedence in any court fight over laws or regulations.
 
5) The amendment establishes new immunities
 
Doctors and Treatment Centers and their employees could not be sanctioned criminally or civilly for acting in accordance with the amendment and the regulations. Patients could not be sanctioned civilly or criminally for using medical marijuana. Opponents worry that this immunity would protect a medical marijuana user who drove under the influence and caused an accident. Proponents say the civil immunity is designed to protect patients from losing custody fights or employment actions simply because they use medical marijuana. A pot user could still be sued for driving under the influence, they say, because that is negligent behavior, whether the driver has taken a prescription drug, alcohol or medical marijuana.
 

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Research Halted on PTSD Study

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, July, 24th 2014 by THCFinder
research-halted-on-ptsdSuzanna Sisley used to be a professor at the University of Arizona, where she was working on four years of bureaucracy and nonsense to obtain the permission in order to conduct what was thought to be an extremely beneficial study. Sisley was getting ready to conduct the first federally approved research on the effects of cannabis on PTSD, an affliction that our veterans deal with on a constant basis. There are very few studies regarding the subject available so veterans, scientists, and marijuana activists were greatly looking forward to the study when the university terminated Sisley via letter, which stated that the researcher was getting the boot because funding was running out and because "the telemedicine program she worked with is shifting in a different direction". The school denies that Sisley was fired because state legislators opposed the work and were pressuring the school to fire her, something which the school claims wasn't happening. The spokesperson from the college said that they are trying to find someone to replace Sisley.
 
People were outraged when the story began to circulate the internet. Firing someone who was so close to conducting such an important study? Not okay. The study would've taken fifty vets, all suffering from the effects of PTSD, and tested those symptoms with different strains and smoking methods of marijuana. This study would've been the first and only controlled study of the effects that marijuana has on the illness and the fact that it's not commencing has a lot of people hanging their heads.
 
While the teacher is asking to be reinstated, Ricardo Pereyda said that ending the study is a huge disservice to military vets. Pereyda served in the Army in the Iraqi war and now suffers from the symptoms, which include serious depression, anxiety, and bad insomnia. "It allowed me to get some much needed rest and sleep," he said. "It reduced my anxiety attacks. It just allowed me to regain something that I had lost overseas during my deployment and allowed me to reconnect with people around me."
 
The process of getting funding and approval for research like this is difficult and Sisley had made it quiet far. With her termination, there is a great worry that the study will no be continued. That ominous feeling is only reinforced by a statement released by Matt Barden, a spokesperson for the Drug Enforcement Administration. He stated, "In regards to medical marijuana, the DEA of course recognizes the pain and suffering of individuals with seriously illness and their need for medication. However, the FDA has repeatedly concluded that marijuana has a high potentially for addition and no acceptable level of medical use." Unfortunately for Barden, the DEA, and the FDA, the acceptance of medical marijuana is spreading like wildfire and the pressure to conduct studies like these will only increase the longer the "War on Drugs" is dragged out.

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