Medical Marijuana

New York legalizes medical marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, July, 8th 2014 by THCFinder
(CNN) -- New York became the latest state to permit the use of medical marijuana on Monday.
At a news conference in New York City, Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the Compassionate Care Act, which allows doctors to prescribe marijuana in a nonsmokable form to patients with serious ailments that are recognized by the state on a predefined but flexible list of conditions.
 Dr. Gupta: I agree with Clinton on pot 'Doubling down' on medical marijuana City council: Free pot for homeless
The bill was passed by the State Assembly and Senate in June, said Jason Elan, a spokesman for Sen. Diane Savino, a sponsor of the bill.
Cuomo said Monday that it was difficult to develop and pass the bill because it needed to embrace increased medical acceptance of marijuana while rejecting situations and conditions that state legislators said could have "good intent and bad results."
"There is no doubt that medical marijuana can help people," Cuomo said Monday. "We are here to help people. And if there is a medical advancement, then we want to make sure that we're bringing it to New Yorkers."
Senate Co-Leader Jeffrey D. Klein said the "patient-centric program" will provide relief to thousands of people and will be "one of the safest, most tightly regulated medical marijuana programs in the country."
The legalization of medical marijuana has had "overwhelming support" in state polls, State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver has said in a statement.
'I like weed and I'm a good person': Pot smokers fight stereotypes
Cuomo has said the act included criminal penalties in case a person tries to defraud the system, as well as a "fail safe" mechanism allowing the governor to "suspend the program at any time on recommendation of either the State Police Superintendent or the Commissioner of Health if there is a risk to the public health or public safety."
New York will be the 23rd state, along with the District of Columbia, to allow medical marijuana in some form, according to information compiled by the National Conference of State Legislatures.
Among the states that allow medical marijuana are Connecticut, Vermont and New Jersey, each of which borders New York.
The momentum has picked up recently, with most of these efforts taking effect over the past decade.
Read more:


Raleigh NC Passes CBD Oil Bill

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, July, 7th 2014 by THCFinder
Epilepsy is a terrible affliction, especially for those who suffer and are children. The amount of seizures that a child can have a day can seriously stunt the growth of the brain and development, leaving young kids unable to hold up their own heads, eat on their own, walk, or function in any way. With harsh medicine and sometimes even animal tranquilizers, it's shocking that a natural medicine like cannabis would be looked over, simply because of some negative nonsense. The plant could help hundreds of thousands of people to cope with the sadness of dealing with epilepsy.
For those who follow my Instagram, you'll know that I'm currently writing from the city of Raleigh, located in North Carolina. So you can only imagine the goofy smile on my face when I stumbled across the article stating that Gov. Pat McCrory signed the bill, allowing epileptic patients to get CBD oil in order to treat the disorder. The North Carolina Senate unanimously voted on House Bill 1220. The bill states that hemp oil extract is now to be considered legal and regulated when a patient has tried three or more treatments and failed to respond. The oil that has been approved is derived from the Charlotte's Web strain, developed for this specific purpose of treating epilepsy in children. The strain is very low in THC but extremely high in CBD, the substance that cannabis contains that has been proven to decrease seizures to the point where the child can function normally and be almost seizure free.
The State Representative that suggested the bill, Pat McElraft, introduced the legislation (named "Hope 4 Haley and Friends") says that the bill isn't going to legalize medical marijuana. Instead, this bill is directed at the children who suffer. McElraft stated that, "This is only a medicine for these children so that they can develop motor skills." The Department of Health and Human Services has until October 1st to set up temporary rules regarding the registration cards for the use of the oil, as well as a database of registered caregivers, patients, and neurologists that recommend the treatment.


Utah Working Towards Getting Epileptic Children Cannabis

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, July, 4th 2014 by THCFinder
It's a mostly well known fact that children with epilepsy seem to respond really well to treatments involving CBD, even when the prescribed medicine doesn't seem to do the trick. Children who have hundreds of seizures a week take a few drops of CBD oil a day and immediately show improvement. Although the plant seems to be doing wonders for these children, not everyone has access to it, as the plant remains illegal. But for those patients in Utah, Primary Children's Hospital are working on getting the right medicine to their little patients.
The patients must apply to be part of the study and unfortunately, there are only 25 spots open for participants. Only those with severe epilepsy will be eligible, from ages 2 to 17 will be able to be a part of the study, in the hopes that the drug Epidiolex will have a positive effect on their symptoms. The neurologists at Primary Children's car will draw the patients names from a pool in order to see who will recieve the treatment.
However, those in Utah have another option starting on July 8th, where those with severe epilepsy will be able to apply for something called a "hemp supplement" card, which will allow them to import whole-plant cannabidiol extracts from states like Colorado. But by getting the hemp supplement card, patients would risk exclusion from the patient pool that will contain those eligible for the study. Patients must obtain a letter from their primary doctor, saying that they have tried the medicines and what the diagnosis is to make sure that they really need the medicine.
The study is federally approved and the only thing standing between the patients and this medicine is bureaucracy, says Ed Clark, chief medical officer at the hospital. Since cannabis is still considered a schedule 1 substance, the hospital also needs a special license in order to handle and provide the medicine. The study has been in the planning process since back in 2013 and the doctors believe that they will get approved to continue this study.
In addition, the Epidiolex that is being given in the study, is still in the planing stages with no published formal results, contains no remnants of THC, unlike the medicine made by the Realm of Caring, the group of growers that makes the CBD oil that seems to have such an amazing effect on those who use it. This oil (known as "artisanal") still have trace amounts of THC in them but do not effect the children who ingest it. This treatment seems to work wonders for those who literally have no other option and have exhausted all of the medicines on the market. In a study that looked at 19 epileptic patients with seizures, nearly half had an 80% reduction in seizures and others saw a considerable drop in seizure frequency. Epidiolex, on the other hand, was studied and showed a high portion of those studied showed a reduction in seizure frequency of greater than 50% and a portion of the patients were reportedly seizure free at the end of the 12 week treatment study.
While Epidiolex will technically be legal for everyone to use, it will be extremely expensive. And by that, the cost of the medicine will be upwards of $10,000 a year, which some people may not be able to afford. Oils from the Realm Of Caring run the patients about $200 and aren't covered by insurance. However, the difference between $2,400 a year and $10,000 a year, plus the appeal of the natural cure may be enough to keep people waiting around for the artisanal oils to become legal... Or they may just move to Colorado.


Medicated Patches

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, July, 2nd 2014 by THCFinder
If you're trying to quit smoking butts, you're probably familiar with the patches that are sold in order to ween the body off of nicotine. These patches are discreet and are the choice way to quit smoking... But if you're not looking to quit cigarettes but are instead, trying to find a sneaky way to medicate throughout the day, then these new patches are definitely something you want to check out. If you have a prescription for medical marijuana, chances are you can find these patches at your local dispensary.
The patches are made by a few different companies. Each one contains a 10mg transdermal patch that the user can put on their skin. There are instructions included but they are very simple. Gently clean the area that you want to place the patch on with isopropyl alcohol and then simply stick the patch on. The makers do recommend that the patch be applied to a venous part of your body, such as the ankles and wrists, so that there is optimum medication happening. With a lifespan of 12 hours, these patches are great for patients who have a long day of work/chemo/or are just feeling not so great.
Since a lot of patients can't smoke marijuana due to their illness, products like these THC patches are extremely beneficial. Without the questionable act of smoking involved, patients are able to medicate safely and in secret. They don't have to worry about smoke, smelling like the plant, or randomly setting off smoke alarms. Plus the long lasting effects are great for chronic ailments. And while the patches do contain THC, they don't make the users f


Marijuana May Delay Vision Loss

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, July, 2nd 2014 by THCFinder
mj-and-vision-lossOne of the most inspiring people I have ever met is a guy named Nelacey Porter. Nelacey is funny, talented, can roll a blunt better than anyone I’ve ever seen, and is an amazing athlete. Nelacey is also blind. Nelacey wasn’t born blind. His vision started deteriorating when he was 11 years old. I met him in college and he would always explain to me that he wished he could go back in time and use cannabis at an earlier age because he thought it would have slowed down the progress of his vision loss.
It appears that Nelacey might be right. Per Medical Jane:
For years medical marijuana has been used to help treat certain conditions that can cause vision loss. The most common example of this is glaucoma, but it is not the only condition for which cannabis may be beneficial.
In fact, a group of researchers from Spain’s University of Alicante published a study earlier this month in the journal Experimental Eye Research that supports this claim. It suggests that cannabinoids may help slow vision loss in the case of retinitis pigmentosa.
The marijuana plant never ceases to amaze me. Marijuana is medicine. If you know someone that is suffering from vision loss, you should recommend that they try cannabis. I look forward to more research involving vision loss and marijuana, and hope more states adopt vision loss as an approvable condition for medical marijuana.


Marijuana And Schizophrenia

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, July, 1st 2014 by THCFinder
Remember how in Reefer Madness, they tried to convince us that cannabis would make us crazy? That, if you chose to indulge in the Devil's Lettuce, you would cackle like a madman and either kill your friends or go off on some sort of sex rampage. Anti-cannabis crusaders have also used the argument that cannabis makes you crazy, with some studies "proving" that cannabis would actually make you crazy. Not until now did anyone think that maybe, possibly, the theory could be reversed.
The connection between cannabis and possibly one of the most frightening of all mind effecting afflictions, schizophrenia, has been disputed for years. While those against weed claim that it's clear that pot makes people crazy, a new study released by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College in London severely deflates the idea that cannabis causes psychosis. In the study, it was shown that a gene related to schizophrenia actually may lead to marijuana use and not the other way around. Robert Power, the man in charge of the study told Reuters in an interview, "We know that cannabis increases the risk of schizophrenia. Our Study certainly does not rule this out, but it suggests that there is likely to be an association in the other direction as well - that a pre-disposition to schizophrenia also increases your likelihood of cannabis use."
The official conclusions went as follows; "Although considerable evidence implicates cannabis use as a component cause of schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether this is entirely due to cannabis directly raising risk of psychosis, or whether the same genes that increases psychosis risk may also increase risk of cannabis use. Although directly predicting only a small amount of the variance in cannabis use, these findings suggest that part of the association between schizophrenia and cannabis is due to a shared genetic aetiology."
So basically what this says is that they're not sure what came first, the chicken or the egg? Whether or not marijuana causes psychosis is still unclear. Or perhaps there is something else causing both of the problems. Bottom line is that no one is sure if weed will cause a development of schizophrenia. So the next time that someone tries to use that argument that it does, you can tell them that they shouldn't be so sure.



Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
14.4 Miles Away | LOS ANGELES,
13.4 Miles Away | Los Angeles ,
15.4 Miles Away | Anaheim,
October 6, 2015 | Category: Fun
October 6, 2015 | Category: Politics
October 6, 2015 | Category: Nugs
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2015
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us