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Medical Marijuana

Indoor Vs Outdoor Cannabis

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, November, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
indoor-vs-outdoor-cannabis
The way that weed is grown greatly effects the end result. If the plant isn't raised correctly or fed the right way, it's not going to produce quality smoking buds. Not only that but there is indoor grown cannabis and outdoor grown. Surprisingly, the two have really different qualities about them. Since the conditions that they're growing in are so different, the buds produced vary in size, shape, and color.
 
Most people prefer to grow indoors. There are more variables that can be controlled, such as light time and temperature, not to mention pest control is far easier. You can also grow year round with indoor. For a lot of people, winter gets too harsh to be able to grow outdoors. Indoor plants can be grown as long as they need to be to get the highest yield possible. On the downside, growing indoors can be extremely pricey. Between the electricity bills and the cost of the supplies, growing indoors requires a substantial down payment if you're looking to get a good grow started.
 
Outdoor weed always carries the smell of the outside with it. Even if it's faint, one can usually tell what plant surrounded the cannabis as it grew. Not to mention your plants have unlimited amounts of space to grow, allowing them to reach tree height if they're allowed to. The sun is also the best lighting that a plant get. There is no bulb that can compare to sunlight and therefore, the plants get what they need from the sun. Unfortunately, you're at the mercy of the elements and hungry animals. Deer are notorious for eating pot plants. What also much be taken in to account is thieves. If someone discovers your grow spot, you could end up with no plants at all.
 
Most of the time, the weed depends on geography. Warmer climates will obviously have primarily outdoor grows. Colder places will usually have a grow outside during the warmer months but continue to grow indoors year round, which actually turns out pretty good. Or a warm climate with both indoor and outdoor. Whatever the case is, if you're growing, props to you! It's a difficult task to grow cannabis well and you hard workers should know that you're appreciated! And to the smokers, enjoy whatever weed you like smoking! Stay high!

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Hershey 3-year-old's condition makes a case for medical marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, November, 27th 2013 by THCFinder
medical-mmj-caseIf Pennsylvania legislators would heed the plight of 3-year-old Hershey resident Garrett Brann, they would agree to take a more rational approach toward the medical use of marijuana.
 
Garrett has Dravet Syndrome, a severe form of epilepsy that starts in infancy. The disease wracks his body with seizures, as if random jolts of electricity are repeatedly shooting through him.
 
With his debilitating condition, Garrett frequently falls and can’t feed himself. His family has tried roughly 10 different types of anti-seizure drugs.
 
One treatment might help, but it is illegal in Pennsylvania.
 
“Charlotte’s Web” is an oil derived from marijuana plants. It comes from a benign strain of marijuana, one that has almost no THC, the chemical that gives users the euphoric “high.” Patients take the oil with food, not by smoking.
 
ther families whose children suffer serious seizures have used the oil extract, with good results. Dr. Sanjay Gupta, CNN’s chief medical correspondent, documented how marijuana is helping treat a child with chronic seizures in Colorado, where medical marijuana is legal.
 
Garrett’s mother told WITF’s Radio SmartTalk Monday she didn’t know if the marijuana oil extract will help her son. But the family would like to give it a try and is considering a move to Colorado.
 
Garrett, his family and others facing similar medical challenges deserve to have every possible tool that might help them, right here in Pennsylvania.
 

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Study shows marijuana's potential for treating autoimmune disorders

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, November, 26th 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-autoimmune-issuesA new study from researchers at the University of South Carolina provides evidence that THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), a principal ingredient in marijuana, may be beneficial in treating those with autoimmune disorders.
 
The study, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, is the first to explore how tiny, yet powerful molecules called microRNAs are influenced by THC. MicroRNAs are a recently discovered class of non-coding RNAs that play a pivotal role in the regulation of gene expression. The ability to alter microRNA expression could hold the key to successful treatments for a whole host of autoimmune diseases, including arthritis, multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes.
 
The study was performed by researchers from USC's School of Medicine by injecting laboratory mice with THC and analyzing 609 microRNAs. The researchers identified 13 unique microRNAs that were highly altered by THC.
 
MicroRNAs have profound effects on the immune system, acting as 'brakes' that target more than 60 percent of all gene expression. Since microRNAs normally suppress the expression of genes, when a microRNA is overexpressed, the affected gene gets silenced. But when microRNA is turned off, the affected gene is expressed at an elevated level.
 
The authors also studied how a specific microRNA—miRNA-690—that was highly overexpressed in response to THC functionally targets an important protein called C/EBPα. This molecule in turn triggers unique cells known as MDSC that suppress inflammation. When the researchers successfully knocked down miRNA-690, the effect of THC was reversed.
 

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82 percent in Florida favor medical marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, November, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder
florida-mmj-favoredIf a medical marijuana initiative makes Florida's ballot next year, it could pass with an astonishing 82 percent of the vote, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll released Thursday that finds voters also favor outright legalization as well.
 
Support for the proposed constitutional amendment is strong among voters of every political stripe, age and income level, with independents lending the most support: 88 percent, the poll shows.
 
The overall 82-16 percent support for medical marijuana is the biggest to date. The previous high-point for Florida approval was about 70 percent in a poll taken earlier this year by the medical-marijuana advocacy group, People United for Medical Marijuana.
 
There are some differences in wording between the initiative and the Quinnipiac poll; the amendment says doctors can "recommend" marijuana, the poll asks if a doctor should be able to "prescribe" it.
 
Still, medical marijuana is clearly popular. And marijuana legalization is becoming more-liked as well, albeit narrowly.
 
Nearly half of Florida voters favor it — 48 percent — while 46 percent oppose pot legalization for personal use. That's within the margin of error, but it's a leading indicator of a shift in public opinion. Support for legalization is again strongest among independents (57-37 percent), and then Democrats (55-39 percent).
 

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Medical marijuana legal in Illinois starting January

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, November, 19th 2013 by THCFinder
illinois-mmj-legalizedPuff, puff, but don’t pass.
 
In August, Gov. Pat Quinn signed the Compassionate Use of Medical Cannabis Pilot Program Act, making Illinois the 20th state to legalize medical marijuana, effective Jan. 1, 2014. However, the state has some of the strictest regulations.
 
According to section 10 of the act, patients will be allowed to be in possession of 2.5 ounces of cannabis every two weeks, which can only be purchased from a cultivation center that has been registered with the Department of Agriculture.
 
Patients will not be allowed to be in possession in a private residence that is also used for child care, are not allowed to use in the presence of a child or anyone under 18 years of age and are not to perform any activity under the influence that would constitute negligence or malpractice, per section 30. Sharing and unauthorized selling are also illegal.
 
The approximately 40 debilitating medical conditions that qualify for medical marijuana use include cancer, HIV, AIDS, Crohn’s disease, agitation of Alzheimer’s, muscular dystrophy and severe fibromyalgia, among others.
The program will be on a trial basis for four years with many of the rules and dispensaries yet to be determined.
 
However, the legalization of medical marijuana has not impacted the regulations for DePaul students.
 
“It’s extremely important for students to understand that they will not be allowed to use medical marijuana on campus,” said Rebecca Aronson, alcohol and substance abuse prevention specialist from the Office of Health Promotion and Wellness.
Under the Smoke Free Illinois Act, smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings. Furthermore, DePaul University must also adhere to the federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act and the Drug Free Workplace Act—both of which prohibit any drug use on college campuses, Aronson added.
 
For the first time in history, Americans favor legalizing marijuana. According to a recent Gallup poll, 58 percent of Americans are in favor of legalizing marijuana. This comes only a year after Washington and Colorado became the first to legalize recreational marijuana.
When asked if medical marijuana should be smoked on campus, Christina Brown, a second year graduate student in journalism, was against it.
 

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Utah Doctors Endorse Legalizing Medical Cannabis For Childrens Epilepsy

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, November, 19th 2013 by THCFinder
utah-doctors-push-for-medical-mjThree Utah doctors, including a neurologist from the University of Utah, have announced their support for allowing medical cannabis extracts (such as tinctures) and oils to be used by children who suffer from seizures.
 
In a letter sent to the state’s Controlled Substances Advisory Committee, pediatric neurologist Dr. Francis Filloux said that liquid forms of medical cannabis high in cannabinoids are a promising option for treating children with epilepsy. He says that refusing to legalize the substance would be “making the decision to limit access of our children to a potentially life-improving therapy”.
 
State Representative Gage Froerer, a Republican from Huntsville, will be introducing a measure in the upcoming legislative session which would legalize medical cannabis extracts for children with epilepsy. His proposal would allow cannabis products such as cannabis oils to be imported and exported in the state, as long as they have relatively low levels of THC.
 
Advocates in Utah should be contacting their lawmakers – which they can look up by clicking here - and urge them to support this commonsense move towards allowing children with epilepsy to use a natural, nonlethal and nonnarcotic treatment to their condition.
 

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