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Medical Marijuana

Marijuana And Schizophrenia

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, July, 1st 2014 by THCFinder
shizophrenia-and-marijuana
Remember how in Reefer Madness, they tried to convince us that cannabis would make us crazy? That, if you chose to indulge in the Devil's Lettuce, you would cackle like a madman and either kill your friends or go off on some sort of sex rampage. Anti-cannabis crusaders have also used the argument that cannabis makes you crazy, with some studies "proving" that cannabis would actually make you crazy. Not until now did anyone think that maybe, possibly, the theory could be reversed.
 
The connection between cannabis and possibly one of the most frightening of all mind effecting afflictions, schizophrenia, has been disputed for years. While those against weed claim that it's clear that pot makes people crazy, a new study released by the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College in London severely deflates the idea that cannabis causes psychosis. In the study, it was shown that a gene related to schizophrenia actually may lead to marijuana use and not the other way around. Robert Power, the man in charge of the study told Reuters in an interview, "We know that cannabis increases the risk of schizophrenia. Our Study certainly does not rule this out, but it suggests that there is likely to be an association in the other direction as well - that a pre-disposition to schizophrenia also increases your likelihood of cannabis use."
 
The official conclusions went as follows; "Although considerable evidence implicates cannabis use as a component cause of schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether this is entirely due to cannabis directly raising risk of psychosis, or whether the same genes that increases psychosis risk may also increase risk of cannabis use. Although directly predicting only a small amount of the variance in cannabis use, these findings suggest that part of the association between schizophrenia and cannabis is due to a shared genetic aetiology."
 
So basically what this says is that they're not sure what came first, the chicken or the egg? Whether or not marijuana causes psychosis is still unclear. Or perhaps there is something else causing both of the problems. Bottom line is that no one is sure if weed will cause a development of schizophrenia. So the next time that someone tries to use that argument that it does, you can tell them that they shouldn't be so sure.

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Free Medical Marijuana For Patients?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, June, 30th 2014 by THCFinder
free-mmj-for-patientsThe most important people fighting in the war for marijuana acceptance are the patients. They suffer daily at the hands of modern medicine, trying simply to make it through their day, accomplishing the bare minimum, if that. Patients need cannabis. With amazing qualities like pain management, appetite stimulant, and just plain relief, this plant is incredibly important in the medical aspect. And if you're a patient in San Jose, pay attention to the news because there may be free medical marijuana in your future... If you decide to vote that is!
 
San Jose recently chose a new mayor and are now planning to reelect five out of ten of the seats in the City Council. And unfortunately for marijuana patients, there is a proposal in the works that would straight up ban medical marijuana in the city, essentially putting hundreds of patients at risk by putting them back on prescription meds. If you are a resident in San Jose with a medical marijuana card, and you vote on Tuesday, you could wind up getting free (or at least discounted) bud from dispensaries all over the city. This effort is an attempt to get people up off their asses and vote! If the measure passes, dispensaries will no longer be allowed to operate in San Jose.
 
Even though this free giveaway is a violation of the federal voting code, people don't seem to really give a care. The plant is still considered illegal by the Feds, as getting free or discounted weed in exchange for registering and voting (when a federal race or issue is on the ballot) there really isn't too much difference. When voters arrive to cast their ballot, they will see that there are no marijuana specific measures to vote on but rather who the new governor will be. Marijuana should absolutely still be allowed to be sold at the dispensaries that are operating according to state code, giving patients the access to medicine that actually works.

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The Disaster Of CBD-Only Medical Marijuana Legislation

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, June, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder
cbd-only-extract-oilSince the premiere of Dr. Sanjay Gupta’s documentary “Weed” back in August, the general public has quickly come to understand the miraculous healing power of cannabidiol, or CBD.  The political perception of medical marijuana changed forever when parents saw little Charlotte Figi, the girl with intractable epilepsy, go from hundreds of seizures a week to just one or two, thanks to CBD treatments.
 
But that change in perception isn’t a good one.  For now there are two types of medical marijuana – CBD-Only and “euphoric marijuana”, as New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie calls medical marijuana that contains THC.  Just as “We’re Patients, Not Criminals” cast non-patients as criminals, the lobbying for these new CBD-Only laws relies heavily on pointing out that CBD is a “medicine that doesn’t get you high”, which casts THC at best as a medicine with an undesirable side effect and at worst as not a medicine but a drug of abuse.
 
This is a disaster both politically and medically; let’s begin with the former.  Politically, whole plant medical marijuana (the kind with THC in it) began in 1996 in California and from that point, it took eleven years before there were a dozen whole plant medical marijuana states in America.  CBD-Only medical marijuana began in March in Utah and from that point, it’s taken only four months to put us on the brink of a dozen CBD-Only medical marijuana states.
 
Also consider that of those first dozen whole plant states, eight of them were passed by citizen ballot initiative.  All twelve of the CBD-Only laws were passed by state legislatures, often by unanimous or near-unanimous votes.  Every legislature that has taken up the issue of CBD-Only medical marijuana has seen the legislation fly through the committees and both chambers (except Georgia, and that state was only derailed by some parliamentary shenanigans by one legislator).  Take North Carolina this week as an example.
 
On Tuesday, a committee of the North Carolina House of Representatives cancelled a meeting to discuss a CBD-Only bill.  No rescheduled date for the meeting was announced.  Local newspapers on Wednesday posted headlines that the bill’s passage was unlikely.  The Senate wasn’t likely to pass the bill in this short session that ends next week.  There would be no good reason for the House to move forward with the bill.
 
But on Wednesday afternoon, the meeting was suddenly rescheduled and the CBD-Only bill passed unanimously.  This morning (Thursday) the bill was heard by a second committee and passed immediately.  This afternoon it was heard and amended on the House floor where it passed 111-2.  It now awaits passage by the state Senate.
 
By the end of this week, it seems North Carolina could become the 12th CBD-Only state, joining Alabama, Florida, Iowa, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri (awaiting governor’s signature), New York (governor’s executive order), South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.  Why are legislators so fast to pass these CBD-Only bills?  It’s fair to assume politicians are moved by the plight of epileptic children.  With CBD-Only, there’s no downside of being the guy or gal who voted for legalizing something that “gets you high”.  But even so, how do these bills move so fast and garner little to no opposition?
 
Because CBD-Only bills are political cover.  Voting for the CBD-Only bill allows the politicians to say they’re sympathetic to the plight of sick people and want to help patients get any medicine that will ease their suffering.  But they can also still play the “tough on drugs” game and maintain their support from law enforcement and prison lobbies.  Their vote garners headlines that a politician formerly considered “anti-medical marijuana” has “changed his mind” or “altered her stance” on medical marijuana.  Best of all, it gets the sick kids and their parents out of the legislative galleries and off the evening news.  For the politicians in these conservative states, it makes the medical marijuana issue go away, or at least puts the remaining advocates in the “we want the marijuana that gets you high” frame where they are more easily dismissed.
 
Medically, the CBD-Only laws are also a disaster.  Cannabidiol is just one constituent of cannabis and by itself, it doesn’t work as well as it does with the rest of the plant.  Dr. Raphael Machoulem, the Israeli researcher who discovered THC (the cannabinoid that “gets you high”), called it “the entourage effect”, the concept of many cannabinoids and other constituents working in concert, synergistically.  To make an overly-simple analogy, it’s as if we discovered oranges have vitamin C in them, but banned oranges completely and only allowed people with scurvy to eat vitamin C pills.  Yes, those pills can help you if you’re vitamin deficient, but any nutritionist will tell you eating the whole orange will not only allow your body to absorb the vitamin C better, the fiber from the orange is also good for your body, and oranges taste delicious, which makes you a little happier.  Plus, if oranges are in your diet, you’re not going to get scurvy in the first place.
 
The authors of these CBD-Only bills aren’t writing them for optimal medical efficacy, however, they’re writing them for political cover.  The parents treating their children in Colorado with CBD oil will tell you that it takes quite a bit of tinkering with the ratio of CBD to THC in the oil to find what works best for their child’s type of seizures.  Some of these kids need a higher dose of THC.  But the legislators write the laws mostly to ensure that the THC “that gets you high” is nearly non-existent.
 
The North Carolina law, for instance, mandates that the oil contains at least 10 percent CBD and less than 0.3 percent THC.  That’s a CBD:THC ratio of at least 34:1.  For comparison, an article by Pure Analytics, a California cannabis testing lab, discusses the high-CBD varietals most in demand by patients are “strains with CBD:THC ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 20:1.”  The article explains how a breeding experiment with males and females with 2:1 ratios produced 20:1 ratio plants about one-fourth of the time.  It also describes a strain called “ACDC” that “consistently exhibited 16-20% CBD and 0.5-1% THC by weight.”  That’s one variety with a range of 16:1 to 40:1.  But you must only use the ones that are 34:1 or higher.
 

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Medical Marijuana Could Help Treat Sickle Cell Disease

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, June, 17th 2014 by THCFinder
sickle-cell-disease-could-be-helped-by-medical-cannabis
People who suffer from sickle cell disease have to deal with a lot of pain. Patients with sickle cell disease have crescent shaped blood cells, compared to disc shaped blood cells in people who don’t suffer from sickle cell disease. These cells block blood flow, which causes pain, fatigue, and organ damage. I’ve heard people that suffer from sickle cell disease describe the pain as being like nails poking their entire body.
 
Doctors usually prescribe opiate based pain killers like morphine for sickle cell disease. Opiate prescriptions have a lot of side effects including respiratory issues, damage to organs, and addiction to name a few. Compare that to medical marijuana, which has far less harmful side effects, especially if consumed in food or vapor form. Patients should have the option to choose medical marijuana if they want to. From Minnesota Daily:
 
School of Dentistry professor and pain expert Donald Simone, who is also working on the research project, said opiates sometimes have “problematic” side effects, such as respiratory depression. And Gupta said patients sometimes receive incorrect dosages of the drugs because their exact amount of pain is unknown.
 
Medical marijuana is promising for sickle cell patients because it has a pain-relieving effect without as many severe side effects as morphine, Simone said.
 
Right now researchers in California are teaming up with researchers at the University of Minnesota to find out how medical marijuana can help those suffering from sickle cell disease. Right now, sickle cell patients can get safe access to medical marijuana if they are in California. However, patients in Minnesota will have to wait until the condition is added to the list of approvable conditions in Minnesota, which could take awhile.
 

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Colorado To Grant Nine Million Dollars For Medical Marijuana Research

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, June, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-research-fundedColorado is about to start the largest state-funded effort to research medical marijuana. A bill was signed earlier this year that approved millions of dollars for marijuana research in Colorado. The bill should result in roughly 9 million dollars in research grants being handed out over the next five years.
 
Marijuana research has always been hindered by the federal government, who does it’s own research in secret and tries to fight attempts by others. There have been privately funded research projects, but those projects are always limited by funding. California has spent 8.7 million dollars on research over the last twelve years, which is some of the most solid information ever released and is relied upon by many people in the industry.
 
It’s great to see the State of Colorado step up research, which will not only benefit Colorado, but also other states that will get to look at the results of the research. Marijuana supporters have always wanted scientific studies, and are willing to let the truth speak for itself. The same cannot be said for marijuana opponents, who deep down know that the scientific results will make it harder to spread their propaganda. That’s why they fight so hard against it. Per the Denver Post:
 
“Our intent is to be rigorous scientifically, but to also act with some expediency because these are products that a large percentage of our population is using today,” said Dr. Larry Wolk, the executive director and chief medical officer of the health department. “We want to make sure that what’s happening out there in everyday practice isn’t harming people.”
 
The future of marijuana science is bright. I can’t wait to see what information the Colorado research turns up. Suffering patients will benefit from the information, as will future marijuana reform campaigns. I wonder how Kevin Sabet will try to spin this into a bad thing?
 

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Denver may shut down dozens of medical-marijuana businesses on July 1

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, June, 10th 2014 by THCFinder
denver-may-shut-down-dozens-of-mmj-casesDenver officials could soon shut down as many as 41 medical marijuana businesses as the city cleans up outstanding license applications that have been pending for years.
 
All medical marijuana businesses in the city must be licensed by July 1, and the city has sent letters to dozens of businesses ahead of the deadline, warning that they must cease operations if they don't get their licenses by then.
 
"Failure to comply may result in law enforcement and administrative action," cautioned a letter sent to the businesses last week.
 
Ashley Kilroy, Denver's coordinator for marijuana policy, said city officials have also visited the businesses — mostly cultivation facilities — to urge them to finish up the licensing process.
 
"We hope that they'll be in compliance and, if not, we'll have to figure out how we go about enforcing the order to cease operations," she said.
 
The issue reaches back to the genesis of Colorado's regulated marijuana industry. Marijuana businesses in Colorado need both a state and local license to operate.
 
When state and city officials began licensing medical marijuana shops in 2010, they allowed stores and affiliated businesses that were already operating to stay open while their applications were being reviewed. In regulatory parlance, such businesses were "operational pending."
 
Dozens of businesses remained in that licensing limbo for years, and state and city regulators have only in the past year significantly chipped away at the backlog. When Denver officials sent a letter about the July 1 deadline earlier this year, it went to 101 businesses that still needed a city license.
 
That number is now down to 41, though almost none of them are stand-alone businesses. Three of the still-unlicensed businesses applied to make marijuana-infused products. The remaining 38 are cultivation facilities that are attached to already-licensed stores.
 

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