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Medical Marijuana

Marijuana May Help Treat Digestive Disorders

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Sat, August, 10th 2013 by THCFinder
mmj-treats-digestive-disordersA new study published by the Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, and conducted by researchers at McMaster University, has concluded that THC – a prime compound in cannabis - may protect the body against digestive disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease.
 
Researchers for the study used THC on rats, andfound that the substance “could protect the lining of the stomach and intestine from injury and accelerate healing from inflammation.”
 
During the study, researchers found the THC to be useful even when given in small enough doses to not produce the “high” that typically comes with it: “We were getting effects locally in the lining of the intestine and the stomach without producing high enough blood levels of THC to cause behavioral changes”.
 
Those interested in reading the full study – which was funded by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of Canada - can do so by clicking here.
 

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Sanjay Gupta backs medical marijuana, apologizes for previous views

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, August, 9th 2013 by THCFinder
medical-marijuana-stanceOne of America's most prominent doctors says he has shifted his stance in support of medical marijuana.
 
Dr. Sanjay Gupta, chief medical correspondent at CNN and a CBS News contributing medical correspondent, wrote a post today on CNN.com called, "Why I changed my mind on weed," in which he describes his change of heart that occurred while filming a documentary, aptly titled, "Weed."
 
"Long before I began this project, I had steadily reviewed the scientific literature on medical marijuana from the United States and thought it was fairly unimpressive," wrote Gupta. "Well, I am here to apologize."
 
Gupta says he was too dismissive of the "loud chorus" of legitimate patients whose symptoms improved with help from medical marijuana. He now says, "I mistakenly believed the Drug Enforcement Agency listed marijuana as a schedule 1 substance [a category of dangerous drugs] because of sound scientific proof."
 
"They didn't have the science to support that claim, and I now know that when it comes to marijuana neither of those things are true," wrote Gupta, citing patient cases including a 3-year-old whose seizures were dramatically reduced from 300 a week to three a month with medical marijuana's help.
 
He adds that marijuana does not have a high potential for addiction compared to cocaine, or even cigarettes.
 
Gupta is a faculty member in the department of neurosurgery at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and in 2009, reports suggested he was offered the post of Surgeon General by President Barack Obama.
 

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Legal fight brews on impairment in medical-marijuana DUIs

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, August, 8th 2013 by THCFinder
mj-duis
Medical-marijuana cardholders in Arizona who drive after using the drug may face a difficult legal choice: their driver’s license or their marijuana card. If they use both, they could be charged with DUI.
 
Valley prosecutors say that any trace of marijuana in a driver’s blood is enough to charge a motorist with driving under the influence of drugs and that a card authorizing use of medical pot is no defense.
 
But advocates of medical marijuana, which voters approved in November 2010, argue that the presence of marijuana in a person’s bloodstream is not grounds for charging drivers who are allowed to use the drug.
 
The legal battle over the rights of medical-marijuana cardholders to drive while medicating is being fought in the state’s court system. Motorists convicted in municipal courts, which typically rule it unlawful for a driver to have any trace of marijuana in his or her blood, are appealing cases to Superior Court, where judges’ decisions could set precedents for how the medical-marijuana law applies to Arizona drivers.
 
Eighteen states and the District of Columbia authorize the use of marijuana for medical purposes, making marijuana-related DUIs an issue for police, prosecutors and politicians nationwide.
 
The biggest issue is deciding what blood level of marijuana makes a driver impaired, similar to the way blood-alcohol levels determine when a person is legally drunk.
 
In Arizona, the confusion over interpretation of the Medical Marijuana Act stems from its inception because prosecutors and police didn’t have the chance to weigh in before it went to voters in 2010
 

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Arkansas Marijuana Measure Has Been Revised and Resubmitted for Approval

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, August, 8th 2013 by THCFinder
arkansas-mmjArkansas residents that are in support of a proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize marijuana for medicinal dedications in their republic have submitted a revised plan to the state's Attorney General.
 
The new proposal comes on the heels of Attorney General Dustin McDaniel's rejection of the wording on the initial proposal in July.
 
In order for the measure in question to have an opportunity to attempt traversing the legislative gauntlet of scrutiny, it first must be certified by McDaniel. Once the Attorney General has blessed the general public by granting the measure permission to move forward, then they can begin gathering signatures in an effort to qualify for a slot on the 2014 ballot.
 
The organization Arkansans for Medical Cannabis' projected ballot measure would leave it up to the voters to resolve whether to legalize marijuana for medical, recreational and industrial dedications.
 

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Marijuana stops child's severe seizures

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, August, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-helps-treat-seizures"The biggest misconception about treating a child like little Charlotte is most people think that we're getting her high, most people think she's getting stoned," Josh Stanley said, stressing his plant's low THC levels. "Charlotte is the most precious little girl in the world to me. I will do anything for her."
 
The brothers started the Realm of Caring Foundation, a nonprofit organization that provides cannabis to adults and children suffering from a host of diseases, including epilepsy, cancer, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's, who cannot afford this treatment.
 
People have called them the Robin Hoods of marijuana. Josh Stanley said it's their calling. They use the money they make from medical marijuana patients and get donations from sponsors who believe in their cause. They only ask patients such as the Figis to donate what they can.
 
"We give (cannabis) away for next to free," Stanley said. "The state won't allow us to actually give it away, so we give it away for pennies really."
 
Charlotte gets a dose of the cannabis oil twice a day in her food.
 
Gedde found three to four milligrams of oil per pound of the girl's body weight stopped the seizures.
 
Today, Charlotte, 6, is thriving. Her seizures are down to just one a day, almost solely in her sleep. Not only is she walking, she can ride her bicycle. She feeds herself and is talking more and more each day.
 
"I literally see Charlotte's brain making connections that haven't been made in years," Matt said. "My thought now is, why were we the ones that had to go out and find this cure? This natural cure? How come a doctor didn't know about this? How come they didn't make me aware of this?"
 
The marijuana strain Charlotte and now 41 other patients use to ease painful symptoms of diseases such as epilepsy and cancer has been named after the little girl who is getting her life back one day at a time.
 
Read more: http://www.cnn.com

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Medical marijuana clinic Good Intentions opens in Chicago

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, August, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
mmj-eval-in-chicagoAugust 7, 2013 (CHICAGO) (WLS) -- A medical marijuana clinic opened Wednesday in Chicago's Bucktown neighborhood, becoming the first of its kind in the state of Illinois.
 
Good Intentions is located at 1723 North Ashland Avenue and is managed by a medical practice. There is no large, flashy sign outside the clinic -- only a small one in a window that reads, "Medical marijuana may be right for you."
 
Good Intentions is privately owned by Tammi Jacobi, who said the clinic would open Wednesday for patient evaluations. Marijuana will not be distributed until the Illinois Compassionate Use Act Program Pilot goes into effect on January 1.
 
Jacobi operates a similar clinic in Michigan. The director of the Chicago clinic said there has been such an overwhelming response that the clinic will have an open registration.
 
Last week, Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed a bill making it legal for doctors to prescribe as much as 2.5 ounces of medical marijuana every 14 days for people suffering from certain illnesses.
 
Illinois became the 20th state to legalize medical marijuana.
 
The clinic hours are from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
 

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