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Medical marijuana users still worry about DUI

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Sat, July, 20th 2013 by THCFinder
marijuana-dui-issuesNow that Nevada’s Legislature has ended 13 years of ignoring a voter-approved constitutional mandate to provide medical marijuana to sick people, everything’s fine. Right?
 
Now that state-authorized medical marijuana dispensaries will be setting up shop, starting in 2014, getting the drug won’t involve committing a crime. (Under current law, you can’t buy marijuana, even with a prescription. You can grow your own plants, but buying the seeds is illegal.)
 
But with dispensaries, the problem’s solved. Right?
 
Maybe not.
 
While plenty of time was spent this session getting the dispensary bill passed, the Legislature ran out of time to consider a separate bill that addressed the issue of driving under the influence of marijuana.
 
Medical marijuana users — if they’re not careful — could easily violate the DUI standard found in Nevada Revised Statutes 484C.120(3), which says it’s against the law to drive with more than 2 nanograms of marijuana per milliliter in your blood, or 5 nanograms of marijuana metabolite. (A nanogram is a billionth of a gram, and a milliliter is 1/1000th of a liter.)
 
That’s a stricter standard, by the way, than exists for cocaine or heroin (50 nanograms per milliliter of blood), methamphetamine (100 nanograms) or LSD (10 nanograms). And there is no exception for people who have a prescription for medical marijuana.
 
That means medical marijuana patients might inadvertently smoke or otherwise ingest their medicine, drive a car even hours later and potentially be breaking the law.
 
That bothered Assembly Majority Leader William Horne, D-Las Vegas. His Assembly Bill 351 would have forced prosecutors to prove a driver was actually impaired by marijuana, rather than just show the nanogram standard was exceeded.
 
“I think we set people up for facing charges that may be ridiculous,” Horne said.
 

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A Drugmaker Bets on Marijuana to Treat Diabetes, Epilepsy, and More

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, July, 19th 2013 by THCFinder
mmj-sativex-medicine
 
Medicinal marijuana advocates contend that smoking pot helps relieve pain and alleviate nausea. British drug company GW Pharmaceuticals (GWP:LN) is betting that medicine made from cannabis can also treat maladies as diverse as diabetes, colitis, and epilepsy.
 
GW is the only pharma group in the world now selling a prescription medicine derived from marijuana plants, as opposed to synthetic equivalents. The drug, a nasal spray called Sativex, has been approved by regulators in eight countries—Italy, most recently—to treat spasms associated with multiple sclerosis. A request for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval is pending.
 
Taking aim at a potentially much-bigger market, the company this year plans to launch second-stage clinical trials of a cannabis-based drug that has showed promise in treating Type 2 diabetes. The drug, with the tongue-twisting name of tetrahydrocannabivarin-9, improved patients’ production of insulin and helped lower blood-sugar levels between meals.
 
An estimated 371 million people worldwide suffer from Type 2 diabetes. Patients taking the cannabis-based drug “could potentially be controlled on oral therapy for a longer period of time and wouldn’t need to take injections,” says Mike Cawthorne, a GW consultant who is director of metabolic research at the University of Buckingham.
 

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Marijuana Use Associated With Decreased Symptoms Of Opiate Withdrawal

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, July, 18th 2013 by THCFinder
drug-withdrawlsCannabis consumption is associated with mitigated symptoms of opiate withdrawal in subjects undergoing methadone maintenance treatment, according to the findings of a new study published online in The American Journal on Addictions.
 
Investigators at the Farber Institute for Neurosciences at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia assessed the use of cannabis in 91 opiate-dependent subjects undergoing methadone maintenance treatment. Researchers found that subjects seeking methadone treatment who acknowledged a history of cannabis use reported “significantly less daily expenditure on acquisition of opiates.”
 
Authors additionally reported that subjects’ use of cannabis during treatment was associated with less severe symptoms of withdrawal on the clinical opiate withdrawal scale (COWS), an index designed to serve as an objective measure of opiate withdrawal. “[I]ncreased cannabis use was found to be associated with lower severity of [opiate] withdrawal in a subset of the sample with available chart data,” authors wrote. “These results suggested a potential role for cannabis in the reduction of withdrawal severity during methadone induction.”
 
They concluded, “The present findings may point to novel interventions to be employed during treatment for opiate dependence that specifically target cannabinoid-opioid system interactions.”
 

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Medical Marijuana For Kids: Why I Give Cannabis To My 7-Year-Old

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, July, 18th 2013 by THCFinder
7year-old-treated-mj
 
With news stories and opinion pieces popping up daily about medical marijuana legalization, dad Brandon Krenzler and his 7-year-old daughter, MyKayla Comstock, appeared on HuffPost Live this week to discuss what happens when a minor needs the drug. MyKayla has Leukemia and started taking it shortly after she was diagnosed.
 
Currently, medical marijuana is legal in 18 states and in Washington D.C. However, as Valerie Vande Panne wrote in the Boston Globe, many parents are afraid to ask their children's doctors for the drug, despite support from lawmakers.
 
In a heartbreaking piece, HuffPost blogger Suzanne Leigh, a mother who lost her own child to cancer, spoke about some of the anxiety she felt around the issue. Ultimately, Leigh decided to buy marijuana for her 11-year-old, but she knew other moms and dads who would never consider using it to help their children with cancer.
 
In the clip above, Krenzler says that when MyKayla was first diagnosed, cancer affected her in ways that were "terrifying."
 
"She was very sick, she was in a lot of pain ... she was basically experiencing everything you wouldn't want your daughter to experience," he says.
 
MyKayla adds that she was "really tired" all of the time. But now, she feels better.
 
Read more and see the video here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

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Medical marijuana may be an alternative option for controlling pain

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, July, 18th 2013 by THCFinder
mmj-pain-helperHOUGHTON - For patients with chronic conditions, ongoing disease management is an important part of maintaining health and controlling negative side effects of a disease. Disease management can include diet, exercise, medication and, for some patients, medical marijuana.
 
"It has a lot of components that are good for pain," said Dr. Robert Townsend, an osteopathic physician with over 20 years experience. "For patients with chronic pain it can be a substitute for narcotics or used to reduce narcotics in pain management. I found that patients using medical marijuana required less narcotics than those who were not."
 
Townsend, who has never personally used marijuana, began working with it as a way of reducing narcotic dependency while managing chronic pain. He found that patients who incorporated medical marijuana into their disease management were able to manage symptoms while eliminating or severely reducing the use of addictive narcotics.
 
Different strains of medical marijuana are shown at Northern Specialty Health in Houghton. Northern Specialty Health works with many different strains of medical marijuana with both indica and sativa characteristics.
 
Based on Michigan Medical Marihuana Act passed in 2008, patients deemed eligible for medical marijuana must have been diagnosed by a physician as having a debilitating medical condition. Specific conditions listed in the act include cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired immune deficiency syndrome, hepatitis C, ALS, Chrohn's disease, Alzheimer's and nail patella. Patients whose chronic illnesses or the treatment of those illnesses result in certain side effects such as severe pain, nausea and seizures are also eligible to apply for a medical marijuana card. According to the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, as of May 31 there are 128,441 active registered qualified medical marijuana patients.
 
"I use it a lot with patients with Crohn's disease. I have never seen healthier Crohn's patients than when they are using medical marijuana," said Townsend. "It gets people off handfuls of Vicodin and other painkillers. I've seen it stop seizures in front of me. It's very impressive stuff. It can also be used to treat glaucoma and nausea resulting from chemotherapy and other drugs. It can help patients tolerate anxiety medications better because the associated nausea is reduced so they're able to keep taking those anxiety meds comfortably."
 
There are two categories of medical marijuana - cannabis indica and cannabis sativa. Within these categories are various of strains of marijuana, each which can produce different results.
 

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New Study: Cannabis Can Slow, Cure Alzheimers Disease

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, July, 17th 2013 by THCFinder
curing-ailments
 
A new study conducted by researchers at the Roskamp Institute in Florida, and published in the journal Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, has found that cannabis can slow the effects of Alzheimer’s Disease, and may in fact be able to halt it entirely.
 
According to Corbin Bachmeier, Ph.D – who’s the lead researcher of the study – Alzheimer’s Disease is “the result of impaired Aβ [Amyloid-β protein] clearance from the brain”. According to this study, cannabis can solve this problem, making it a potential treatment.
 
Here’s the study’s abstract:
 
Emerging evidence suggests beta-amyloid (Aβ) deposition in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brain is the result of impaired clearance, due in part to diminished Aβ transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Recently, modulation of the cannabinoid system was shown to reduce Aβ brain levels and improve cognitive behavior in AD animal models. The purpose of the current studies was to investigate the role of the cannabinoid system in the clearance of Aβ across the BBB. Using in vitro and in vivomodels of BBB clearance, Aβ transit across the BBB was examined in the presence of cannabinoid receptor agonists and inhibitors. In addition, expression levels of the Aβ transport protein, lipoprotein receptor-related protein1 (LRP1), were determined in the brain and plasma of mice following cannabinoid treatment. Cannabinoid receptor agonism or inhibition of endocannabinoid-degrading enzymes significantly enhanced Aβ clearance across the BBB (2-fold). Moreover, cannabinoid receptor inhibition negated the stimulatory influence of cannabinoid treatment on Aβ BBB clearance. Additionally, LRP1 levels in the brain and plasma were elevated following cannabinoid treatment (1.5-fold), providing rationale for the observed increase in Aβ transit from the brain to the periphery. The current studies demonstrate, for the first time, a role for the cannabinoid system in the transit of Aβ across the BBB. These findings provide insight into the mechanism by which cannabinoid treatment reduces Aβ burden in the AD brain and offer additional evidence on the utility of this pathway as a treatment for AD.
 
This research validates past studies (including some presented earlier this year, as well as a 2006 study), though is the first to actually explain why cannabis can be beneficial to the disease.
 

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