Search:
Login:
OR

Medical Marijuana

Medical Uses of Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, June, 3rd 2013 by THCFinder

Medical marijuana has been a hot topic of discussion in recent years: let’s take a look at some of the most frequently asked questions about this alternative treatment

Mother Nature has many effective treatments in her medicine cabinet, but few herbal remedies have generated as much buzz in the media as medical marijuana;

Whilst apothecaries, physicians and medicine men across the ancient world regularly prescribed marijuana to treat their patients’ ailments, the modern medical community is still divided over the medicinal uses of cannabis;

Proponents of cannabis in modern medicine argue that this naturally-occurring substance (or elements derived from it, such as THC) should be openly accepted as a safer alternative to some pharmaceutical drugs.

Indeed, today many professionals practicing in territories where cannabis remains a controlled substance are calling for the legalisation of this herb and its derivatives for medical applications.

Those who oppose the use of medical marijuana often raise the spectre of some potentially harmful side-effects that have been linked to cannabis use.

With both of these viewpoints in mind, let’s take a look at some of the most frequently asked questions regarding this controversial crop:

What conditions is medical marijuana used to treat?

The herb cannabis has many wide-ranging effects which have been documented in antiquity, as well as extensively studied by the modern medical community: among other things, medical marijuana can be used to treat:

·         Chronic Pain: Various studies have shown that cannabis can make for a potent treatment which can help patients suffering from chronic pain to effectively manage their symptoms.

·         Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Trials into MS treatment using cannabinoids have focussed upon the relaxing, anti-spasmodic properties locked within marijuana, as well as its analgesic effects.

·         Glaucoma: Cannabis has been used in the treatment of patients with glaucoma, with some studies showing that even a small percentage of THC can reduce intra-ocular pressure by a significant amount (in some cases, by as much as ¼).

·         Alzheimer’s disease: Modern studies have shown that cannabinoids may be helpful in slowing down, or even preventing the onset of many symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s, with some of the properties inherent in THC helping the brain in a number of effective ways – in some cases, outperforming mainstream drug treatments.

·         Cancer: Modern research in the fight against cancer has shown that cannabis can be a useful tool in combatting breast and brain cancers, in some cases helping to prevent metastasis or even bringing about the death of cancer cells by making them essentially ‘cannibalise’ each other.

·         HIV: The pain-relieving and appetite-stimulating properties of cannabis have been shown to help HIV and AIDS patients to manage their symptoms, especially when the herb is combined with other treatments.

What are the beneficial properties of using marijuana as a treatment?

Aside from the wide range of conditions which cannabis has been shown to be effective in treating, the herb also provides a number of interesting health benefits:

·         Cannabis possesses effective analgesic properties, which can make it a potentially safer alternative to some opiate-based painkillers.

·         The relaxing effects of the herb can help to improve a person’s sleep.

·         It has been shown to slow down some of the effects of aging on the brain.

·         As an effective expectorant, cannabis can useful for treating certain respiratory conditions.

·         It can stimulate the appetite and reduce nausea.

Are there side effects of using marijuana to treat medical conditions?

When compared with commercially available pharmaceutical drugs, cannabis has been shown to be a relatively safe treatment: there are no published cases of any human fatalities as a result of cannabis poisoning, which, sadly, cannot be said about many legal drugs on the market;

Despite the positive effects of cannabis in treating medical conditions, the herb can lead to some potentially harmful side effects:

·         It can lead to increased heart rate, which can pose a risk to older patients, or those with heart conditions.

·         Much like alcohol, cannabis can impair a person’s ability to drive, meaning that users of medical marijuana shouldn’t get behind the wheel when under the influence of the herb.

·         A person’s mood can be affected: cannabis can produce anything from a pleasant calming sensation, to tense anxiety.

·         Respiratory conditions can be exasperated, especially when medical marijuana is consumed by smoking: such a delivery method can also pose similar risks to inhaling tobacco-smoke, including an increased risk of developing certain kinds of cancer. 

·         Whilst studies show that it not as addictive as tobacco or alcohol, long-term use of marijuana can lead to addiction.


Comments

Mom's Cancer Struggle Prompts Medicinal Marijuana Advocacy

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Sun, June, 2nd 2013 by THCFinder
Recently, the powerhouse former broadcaster and advertising saleswoman found another mission: sharing the message that medical marijuana can be life-changing for people with serious illnesses.
 
“It [medicinal marijuana] gave me back my life,” said Tracey, who suffered from severe headaches and lived on strong medications which left her bedridden until she took marijuana.
 
Since last May, medical marijuana has been legalized in Connecticut, although not to grow or sell. Tracey has joined the board of Vintage Foods, Ltd, which is bidding to be a distributor of marijuana to eligible patients when a legal path is approved.
 
By speaking out, Tracey hopes that she will be the public face of a medical marijuana patient. She is adamant about removing the fear and stigma from this medical treatment.
 
“I’m very proud to step into the spotlight to help patients, the public and politicians become educated on how medicinal marijuana can change the quality of life for those of us with devastating diseases,” she says.
 

Comments

Medical marijuana ingredient prevents brain damage in mice

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Sat, June, 1st 2013 by THCFinder
LOS ANGELES — The words “marijuana” and “brain damage” usually go in that order in medical literature. An Israeli researcher has flipped them around, finding that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may arrest some forms of brain damage in mice.
 
Pharmacologist Josef Sarne of Tel Aviv University found that a minuscule amount of tetrahydrocannabinol may protect the brain after injuries from seizures, toxic drug exposure or a lack of oxygen....
 

Comments

Marijuana helps mitigate Chron's disease

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 30th 2013 by THCFinder
Over the past several years, I have had my share of stomach cramps, lack of appetite and sleepless nights due to Crohn’s disease. I am thrilled the Illinois legislature passed a bill that can bring me relief in the form of medical marijuana. My doctor and I are now both waiting for Gov. Quinn to sign the bill and make it into law.
 
I have tried steroids and other drugs, and none of these drugs helped my condition. Battling Crohn’s is a daily challenge. Medical marijuana helps reduce the incredibly painful swelling in my intestines, keeps my appetite up and helps me sleep at night. Medical marijuana addresses all these things.
 
A very recent study by Israel’s Meir Medical Center found that use of medical marijuana can even result in complete remission of my disease. It’s hard to put into words how good that news is.
 
Ads by Google
 
I would like to thank the legislature for seeing the wisdom in a well-run medical marijuana program and how it can make all the difference to people like me. I hope the governor signs the bill soon. It is time to let doctors and patients, not police and prosecutors, make medical decisions.
 
— Andrew Stepniak, Streamwood 
 

Comments

Indica vs Sativa

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 30th 2013 by THCFinder

Back in the day, there was chronic and there was schwag.
 
With the boom of the medical marijuana industry in the United States courtesy of Proposition 215, stoners have been able to refine their palates and make informed decisions about what they smoke. At medical marijuana dispensaries, the flowers will be divided into three categories: indica, sativa and hybrid. All three of these offer different effects and treat various ailments. To many, the terms indica and sativa are household names while to others, these words are still foreign. Neither sativa nor indica are better than the other, it is simply a matter of personal preference. Even if you think you know all there is to know about these terms, read on, because you can never know too much about marijuana!
 
 
Sativa
For decades, cannabis sativa was the most available marijuana strain in the United States before the distinction between the two was made. It is indigenous to tropical and sub-tropical climates such as the equatorial regions of Mexico, Panama and Southeast Asia (just to name a few). The physical characteristics of the sativa plant is that they are tall and lanky with long, slender leaves.
 
When grown in the ground, sativa plants can grow up to 20 feet in a single season.
 
It is because of these tall sturdy stalks that cannabis sativa is most frequently used for harvesting hemp. Cannabis sativa that is harvested for hemp is generally low in THC and is not meant for consumption. Though the flowers and leaves do contain trace amounts of the psychoactive ingredient THC, it is not recommended.
 
Sativas that are grown for consumption are often higher in THC than indicas but lower in CBD (cannabidiol) though with modern growing techniques, it seems as if both indicas and sativas come in all potencies these days. The effects of sativa are extremely cerebral and are usually concentrated in the head and upper body. Sativa offers an uplifting more energetic high versus indica which make them perfect for daytime use. Sativas allow stoners to go about their daily routines without the heavy couch-lock effect that indicas often produce. Adversely, when smoked at night, they may keep you awake. They are also best for creative exploration as they awaken the mind instead of calm it. Sativas stimulate the mind and depending on the strain and the user, can sometimes cause anxiety. If you have experienced this mind-racing feeling when smoking sativas, then you are most likely an indica smoker. Sativas are excellent for social situations as they can make the user quite loquacious and giggly.
 
Medicinally, sativas are best at relieving depression, headache or migraine, toothache, social anxiety, glaucoma or other eye related ailments and general pain relief. If you are ever at a dispensary and you do not know whether sativas are right for you, ask your budtender as he or she can assist you in choosing a strain that suits your needs, preferences and ailments. Some examples of popular pure sativa strains are: Green Crack, Silver Haze, Blue Dream, Trainwreck and Jack Herer.
 
Indica
 
Cannabis indica is cannabis sativa’s counterpart. While both are in the same order, family, genus and species, they are very different in effects as well as appearance.
 
Indicas tend to grow shorter and stalkier with thick, squat leaves. While sativas resemble a tree, indicas look more similar to a bush or shrub. They are indigenous to colder climates and are generally found in mountainous regions. The Hindu Kush Mountain range which spans between Afghanistan and Pakistan is the origin of our beloved Kush plant. Because of their short stature and harsh environments, they are stronger against disease and the elements than sativas are. Indica landraces have a higher CBD percentage than sativas and because of this, it is often known as the truly medical strain. CBD offer a wealth of health benefits. Recent research has proven that CBD inhibits, and often completely eliminates, the reproduction of cancerous cells while also returning the effected cells to normal. CBD also has many anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic properties amongst many other benefits.
 
Contrary to sativas, indicas quiet the mind and are best for nighttime use.
 
Some experienced stoners can smoke indicas all day, every day and are still able to lead very productive lives. Many indica strains will create a pensive and contemplative high, sometimes making verbal communication difficult. Indicas are wonderful for meditation and rumination. For most stoners, they will cause drowsiness and extreme relaxation. Smoking a good indica is best for unwinding at the end of a hard or busy day. The majority of medical marijuana users smoke indica because of its powerful anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety and pain relief. Indicas are recommended for the relief of insomnia, anxiety, depression, cancer treatment, cell regeneration, nerve damage, migraine, appetite loss, and hundreds of other ailments. One will usually experience a couch-lock effect, which for some is desired and for others is not. Indicas will definitely cure what ails you. Some examples of popular pure indica strains are: Kush phenotypes, Northern Lights, Hash Plant and God’s Gift.
 

Comments

Most Docs OK With Medical Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, May, 30th 2013 by THCFinder
WEDNESDAY, May 29 (HealthDay News) -- Three-quarters of doctors who responded to a survey about medical marijuana said they would approve the use of the drug to help ease pain in an older woman with advanced breast cancer.
 
In a February issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, doctors were presented with a case vignette, as well as arguments both for and against the use of medical marijuana. Doctors were then asked to decide whether or not they would approve such a prescription for this patient.
 
The results now appear in the May 30 edition of the journal.
 
Seventy-six percent of the 1,446 doctors who responded said they would give the woman a prescription for medical marijuana. Many cited the possibility of alleviating the woman's symptoms as a reason for approving the prescription.
 
"The point of the vignette was to illustrate the kinds of patients that show up on our doorstep who need help. This issue is not one you can ignore, and some states have already taken matters into their own hands," said Dr. J. Michael Bostwick, a professor of psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
 
Bostwick wrote the "pro" side for the survey, but said he could've written the "con" side as well, because there are valid arguments on both sides of the issue.
 
"There are no 100 percents in medicine. There's a lot of anecdotal evidence that this is something we should study more. Forgive the pun, but there's probably some fire where there's smoke, and we should investigate the medicinal use of marijuana or its components," Bostwick said.
 
Marijuana comes from the hemp plant Cannabis sativa. It's a dry, shredded mix of the plant's leaves, flowers, stems and seeds. It can be smoked as a cigarette or in a pipe, or it can be added to certain foods, such as brownies.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
September 19, 2014 | Category: Celebrities
September 19, 2014 | Category: News
September 19, 2014 | Category: Culture
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us