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Medical Marijuana

Florida Dems Add Medical Marijuana To Ballot To Boost Voter Turnout

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, April, 21st 2014 by THCFinder
florida-mmjFlorida Democrats are pushing for a constitutional amendment that would put medical marijuana on the state’s ballot this November. If the initiative passes, Florida would become the first southern state to legalize some form of marijuana usage. Recent Battleground polls have shown widespread support, especially among young voters.
 
In a previous MPP blog post, we discussed how about 70% of voters (nationwide) would be more likely to vote this fall if marijuana was on the ballot, and how midterm elections traditionally have lower voter turnout, especially with young voters and liberals. In the 2012 elections, Washington and Colorado both saw significant spikes in voter turnout, possibly due to marijuana being on the ballot. If Florida follows suit, it will be a testament to marijuana’s spillover effect.
 
Florida Democrats are hoping it “could have a marginal impact,” which doesn’t sound like much, but “a marginal impact in Florida could be the difference between winning and losing,” according to Steve Schale, a Democratic consultant who managed Obama’s Florida campaign in 2008.
 
A recent Republican victory in a special House election last month typified the Democrats’ turnout problem. The St. Petersburg-area district has 2.4 percent more registered Republicans than Democrats, but GOP voters outnumbered Democrats by eight percentage points, according to election results.
 

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Wisconsin Legalizes Medical Marijuana But Only for the Children!

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, April, 18th 2014 by THCFinder
wi-mmjThe discovery that an oil extract from marijuana was successfully treating extremely serious, life-threatening seizures in children with rare disorders has prompted some changes in the way people think about the drug (except, perhaps, for New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie).
 
Medical marijuana is not legal in Wisconsin, but yesterday Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill making it legal in the state to use cannabidiol, a drug made from cannabis, to treat seizure disorders. This particular, singular type of medical marijuana is approved because there’s no chance anybody would enjoy taking it. From the Journal Times of Racine, Wisconsin:   
 
Gov. Scott Walker signed a bill legalizing cannabidiol, or CBD, which has reportedly been shown to work for children in Colorado. It was illegal in Wisconsin because it contains a small amount of THC, the component present in marijuana, but advocates noted that CBD could never be used as recreational marijuana.
 
The bill was written narrowly to apply only to CBD, which must be administered by a physician and is not considered by advocates to be "medical marijuana."
 
Baby steps, anyway. At least there’s another state where parents won’t have to pack up their families and move to Colorado if one of their children turns out to have the disorder. But Wisconsin may not be alone. Several other states that haven’t legalized medical marijuana are nevertheless considering legalizing this one particular marijuana extract for treating this particular rare illness.
 

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What Are The Active Ingredients In Medical Marijuana?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, April, 16th 2014 by THCFinder
active-ingredients-in-mmjThe medicinal and psychoactive effects that we associate with marijuana are caused by unique chemical structures called cannabinoids found in the actual plant. To date, there have been 86 cannabinoids identified in nature and others have been synthesized chemically. The major psychoactive ingredient in marijuana is delta-g-tetrahydrocannabinol, commonly referred to as THC (although other naming systems refer to it confusingly as delta-t-THC). Other cannabinoids, in addition to THC, have medicinal or psychoactive elements.
 
Cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), cannabavarin (THCV), cannabigerol (CBG), cannabichromene (CBC), delta-8-THC, cannabicyclol (CBL), cannabitriol (CBT), and cannabielsoin are among the many different naturally-occurring cannabinoids. Most are known to have psychoactive and/or pharmacological properties just like many other synthetic cannabinoid analogs.
 
Because of delta-9-THC’s psychoactive nature in marijuana, it is regularly used to measure the herb’s potency. THC typically occurs in concentrations of less than 0.5% for inactive hemp, 2 to 3% for marijuana leaf, and 4 to 20% for higher-grade marijuana. In seedless buds, known as sinsemilla, you’ll find the highest concentrations of THC in the plant at 10 to 20% or more. Higher concentrations of THC can be found in extracts, tonics, and hashish (concentrated cannabis resin). Download my free marijuana grow bible for more tips about marijuana strains.
 
Oral doses of THC range from 2.5 to 20 milligrams for therapeutic purposes. A regular joint (1 gram of 2.5% leaf or 0.5 grams of 5% higher-grade leaf) usually has 25 milligrams of THC. Over half of this amount is generally destroyed by combustion or is lost in side-stream smoke. Around 15 to 50% of the THC in a typical marijuana joint actually gets to the bloodstream, making the actual inhaled dose closer to 3 to 12 milligrams.
 
THC will not naturally occur in its active form in the cannabis plant. Instead, it occurs in an acidic form called tetrahydrocannabinolic acid or THC acid (THCA). When burned in a cigarette or heated in cooking, the THCA is rapidly converted to active THC in a heat-propelled reaction called decarboxylation. Unlike THC, we have very little knowledge of THCA. We do know that it is not psychoactive, but it has been discovered to have immune-modulatory properties akin to other cannabinoids.
 
Eating marijuana raw will not produce any strong psychoactive effects because the THCA is essentially inactive. As marijuana ages, however, some of the THCA undergoes decarboxylation. The marijuana resin in hashish usually contains very high levels of active THC.
 
CBD is the next most common cannabinoid and is very prevalent in hemp varieties of cannabis. CBD actually lacks any noticeable psychoactive affects and does not really intereact with the body’s cannabinoid receptors. Despite that, plenty of evidence is starting to show that CBD has valuable medicinal properties. It works in concert with THC, augmenting its medical effects and moderating its psychoactive effects. Some researched think that CBD has anti-psychotic properties which tend to reduce anxiety and panic reactions to THC. It is also considered to improve wakefulness and to supplement THC’s activity against pain and spasticity. Pretreatment with CBD in mice nearly tripled the levels of THC in their brains which is an indication that it can increase the action and effectiveness of other drugs. Cannabinoids definitely work together to provide the desired effect.
 
If taken by itself, CBD has anti-inflammatory anti-anxiety, anti-epileptic, sedative, and neuro-protective properties. It’s also quite a powerful anti-oxidant and can protect against chemical damage due to oxidation. Lab and animal tests have suggested that CBD could even protect against the incurrence of the following diseases: diabetes; certain types of cancer; rheumatoid arthritis; brain and nerve damage as a result of a stroke; alcoholism; Huntington’s disease; and even prion infections like “Mad Cow.” Other evidence suggests that CBD is biphasic, meaning that its effectiveness diminishes if the does is too high or too low.
 
CBD is one of the major ingredients in Sativex, the cannabis spray the UK-based GW Pharmaceuticals is developing. The spray contains equal parts CBD and THC and has been approved for the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis in Canada. GW is at the forefront of CBD research and has plans to study its effectiveness in treating arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, psychotic disorders, and epilepsy.
 
CBD and THC acid (THCA) are produced simultaneously. In the marijuana plant, a cannabinoid called cannabigerolic acid is the precursor for both CBD and THCA. Each cannabinoid is produced by a different enzyme that acts on cannabigerolic acid. Seeing as how CBD and THCA come from the same precursor, it’s hard to find plants that have high level of both. Hemp plants tend to lack the enzyme that produces THCA and, so, CBD is often very prevalent. Unfortunately, most marijuana that’s sold to consumers has significantly lower levels of CBD because growers tend to selectively breed out the CBD enzyme to produce more THC. Now that we know so much about the benefits of CBD, you might start seeing plants with higher levels of CBD in the future.
 

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Maryland To Be 21st Medical Marijuana State

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, April, 15th 2014 by THCFinder
maryland-to-be-21st-medical-marijuana-stateMaryland is set to become the 21st state in America to authorize a medical marijuana program that distributes cannabis to patients. The new law creates a greater responsibility for physicians and less restrictions on the patients and caregivers who handle marijuana.
 
House Bill 881 was introduced Feb. 5th and was signed into law by Governor Martin OMalley on April 14. The program officially begins on July 1. HB 881 is an expansion of a previously-passed bill, HB 1101 of 2013, that authorized medical marijuana research in hospitals. That program failed due to lack of hospital participation.
 
“HB 881 establishes a new form of distribution,” said the national patient advocacy group Americans for Safe Access. In their press release they explained, “According to the new law, the Natalie M. LaPrade Medical Marijuana Commission, which was established under last year’s legislation, will regulate dispensaries, characterized as an entity that “acquires, possesses, processes, transfers, transports, sells, distributes, dispenses, or administers marijuana, products containing food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or ointments, or educational materials for use by a qualifying patient or a caregiver.”"
 
Although the bill is not lengthy, the majority of the new language addresses the doctors and their participation in the program. Physicians must be on staff with a  hospital or hospice, and must pre-register with the state before issuing recommendations. They must also provide a plan to screen the patient for dependence and create a program of follow up care.
 

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D.C. Bill Lets Doctors Decide Medical Marijuana Patient Needs

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, April, 14th 2014 by THCFinder
mmj-needs
On Tuesday, Yvette Alexander, District of Columbia Council member for Ward 7, introduced the Medical Marijuana Expansion Amendment Act of 2014. The bill would amend the previous qualifying conditions list restricting D.C. patients’ access to medical marijuana. Currently, a doctor can only recommend medical marijuana for four conditions (HIV/AIDS, glaucoma, cancer, and multiple sclerosis).
 
Marijuana has been found to help treat a wide variety of conditions beyond those that qualify a patient for the D.C. program.  Alexander’s bill would strike out the qualifying conditions list altogether and permit the physician to make the decision as to whether or not medical marijuana would benefit a patient. This way, doctors wouldn’t have to be constrained by politics or wait for government officials to pass laws every time new benefits are discovered.
 
According to an NBC Washington report, all 13 Council members are in favor of this amendment. Even the Health Department Director, Joxel Gracia, testified that recommending medical marijuana should be up to doctors instead of government officials.
 
D.C.’s prohibitive medical marijuana laws have been largely ineffective, only protecting about 250 patients of the estimated 40,000 eligible patients living in the District since the current law went into effect in 2013. However, the bill would amend neither the rules governing the heavily regulated process by which a patient acquires a medical marijuana card, nor the rules controlling cultivation and distribution
 
Hearings on the new medical marijuana bill are likely to begin in early May of this year, with a vote following soon after.
 

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Group Pushes To End Oklahoma's Ban On Medical Marijuana

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Fri, April, 11th 2014 by THCFinder
end-mmj-banTULSA, Oklahoma - An Oklahoma group is taking a step toward legalizing medical marijuana in the state. Oklahomans for Health will file an application for petition with the Secretary of State Friday, hoping to put the legalization of medical marijuana up for a statewide vote.
"The time is right now in Oklahoma to really get this going," said Oklahomans for Health chairman, Chip Paul.
 
Paul said the non-profit group has made it easy for lawmakers, by drafting a proposal to legalize marijuana for medical purposes.
 
"We've done a lot of research in other states -- what worked, what didn't, what's the most effective way, from a state perspective, to manage this and we've put that language in this initiative, so it should be a very easy thing for the state of Oklahoma to manage," Paul said.
 
Oklahoma's current ban on medical marijuana for medical purposes has some families so desperate that they're leaving the state, like little Jaqie Angel Warrior and her family.
 
Jaqie's mom, Brittany Hardy, said her daughter has the name of fighter.
 
"For a very strong little baby, she's the strongest soul I've ever met in life," said Hardy.
 
Jaqie is living with a very rare and potentially deadly form of epilepsy. At 20 months old, she's already been hospitalized 25 times and has up to 150 seizures a day.
 
"Every day that she's able to wake up and live through these seizures is another miracle and I'm tired of gambling with her life here in this state," Hardy said.
 
Her mom said Jaqie has tried every anti-seizure drug allowed in Oklahoma, with no success and no relief.
 
"She deserves some peace, she deserves her suffering to end, Oklahoma will never provide her that, not right now anyway," said Hardy. "She doesn't deserve to have to suffer just because of her zip code."
 
Hardy said Jaqie's doctor agrees, the little girl's only hope is medical marijuana.
 
So on Saturday, Jaqie, along with her mom, dad and three sisters, are packing up and moving to Colorado, where medical marijuana is legal.
 
"As parents, we refuse to let seizures come in and steal our baby," Hardy said. "At this point, we have no other option."
 
Its stories, like Jaqie's, that have moved Oklahomans for Health to push the state to lift its ban on medical marijuana.
 
"Literally, you could go to the Oklahoma State Penitentiary for treating your cancer with marijuana and that's just wrong," Paul said.
 
He said doctors, not the government, should determine if patients use pot to treat their pain.
 
As of now, Paul said, patients who suffer from serious medical conditions are prescribed pharmaceutical drugs that are highly addictive and have serious side effects.
 
"They would be far better served with something that's non-addictive, that's an herbal remedy, versus and addictive prescription drug," said Paul.
 
Jaqie's parents say their little one takes two different narcotics.
 
"One of them she's physically addicted to, she's been addicted to it since she was 6 months old," Hardy said. "We would literally be arrested if we didn't give them to her."
 
Hardy said she calls and writes lawmakers nearly every day, begging for an amendment to the law. She, like Paul, believes Oklahoma voters have the right to decide whether the marijuana, for medical purposes, should be legalized in the state.
 
"It's a valid medicine and it needs be recognized as such, it could literally help hundreds of thousands of people," Paul said.
 
If the state gives Oklahomans for Health the green light on starting a petition, Paul said the plan would be to kick of the initiative June 1st. Then, they will have 90 days to gather 190,000 physical signatures.
 

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