Search:
Login:
OR

Medical Marijuana

Cancer Patient Supports NC Medical Marijuana Bill

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, February, 12th 2013 by THCFinder
Greensboro, NC -- Imagine being 21 years old, paralyzed from the waist down, and living with chronic pain. It's a reality for Chris Westmoreland.
 
"The tumor just keeps growing. And it presses against the spinal cord, which is a neurological pain, so regular pain killers, such as Oxycontin or even Ibuprofen, none of them work because it's a neurological pain, not a muscular pain," said Westmoreland.
 
Westmoreland was diagnosed with a rare, cancerous tumor three years ago. He was 18 years old at the time, and he couldn't finish college or continue to work.
 
Westmoreland can't have any more radiation -- he's maxed out.
 
He's tried six different chemotherapy drugs that didn't work and all types of pain killers, with side effects that actually made him prefer to deal with the pain.
 
Last week, Guilford County State Representative Pricey Harrison co-sponsored the North Carolina Medical Cannabis Act. The bill would let doctors prescribe marijuana to patients with debilitating medical conditions, including cancer, arthritis and hypertension. It would establish an identification system that would be monitored by the Department of Health and Human Services.
 
The bill also outlines a distribution and supply system, which would be run by the NC Department of Agriculture.
 
And it would give patients, their caregivers, doctors, suppliers and distributors immunity from criminal prosecution.
 
Harrison said she has a personal reason to support this legislation. Her sister had a brain tumor and said synthetic marijuana eased her pain.
 
Westmoreland agrees that medical marijuana could be the only thing to help him.
 
He said, at this point, he knows he'll die. However, he doesn't want to spend more money on expensive medicine that might not work or spend every day laying in bed, suffering needlessly.
 
Westmoreland said if medical marijuana was legalized in North Carolina, it might give him a chance go back to school, back to work and have a decent quality of life.
 
"There's a whole bunch of things that medical marijuana could open up for me, if I know I'm not going to be crying at night because it hurts so much," he said.
 

Comments

Taking your daily meds

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Sat, February, 9th 2013 by THCFinder


Comments

Maine Medical Marijuana Dispensary Says It's Getting Fine Medicine To Patients In Pain

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, February, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
BIDDEFORD, Maine — A type of store Massachusetts has never seen before could soon be opening in a neighborhood near you: a medical marijuana dispensary. The new state law that went into effect last month allows up to 35 of them. And some communities, worried they’ll be a negative influence, are trying to ban these businesses.
 
In the state of Maine, eight dispensaries have opened over the last couple of years. So we visited one in the city of Biddeford to see how it works.
 
“We try and keep a very low profile,” says Canuvo owner Glenn Peterson, a rebellious-looking middle-aged guy with a shaved head and goatee. “There’s enough controversy without having neon marijuana signs flashing.”
 
Peterson says he hunted for a location for his dispensary for a year and kept striking out with hesitant landlords, banks and zoning boards. Finally, despite the objections of some of the other tenants, he bought the condo in the complex he’s now located in and opened for business. And he says he later helped fight –successfully — for a change in state law to prohibit towns from banning dispensaries.
 
Patients need a doctor’s approval to buy the dispensary’s marijuana, which Peterson grows on a separate property about an hour away. In the so-called dispensing rooms, there are display cases of pipes and grinders for sale, and stackable plastic drawers filled with jars and bags of dried marijuana. This pot isn’t just for smoking. Patients can vaporize it using a device similar to an asthma inhaler. They can eat or drink one of Canuvo’s homemade medical marijuana edibles, from chocolates to Rice Krispies squares to tea. A big chalkboard lists the specials of the day, including cannabis butter. Patients spread the butter on toast or spaghetti and then have a “medicated meal,” according to Peterson.
 
Read more: http://www.wbur.org

Comments

New Jersey Medical Marijuana Fight Leaves Patients In Pain

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, February, 7th 2013 by THCFinder
With only one legal dispensary for medical marijuana in New Jersey, the sick are lining up in wheelchairs. Three years after medical cannabis was legalized in the Garden State, the fight to make it available has only just begun.
 
Most nights, 52-year-old Marta Portuguez wakes up crying from pain—jolted out of sleep by horrifying muscle spasms that occur without warning. “I cry my eyes out,” she tells The Daily Beast. “It feels like someone is chopping up my legs with a machete or burning them with a torch from the inside out.” Diagnosed with 11 illnesses over the course of 9 years—including severe fibromyalgia and gastroparesis—the former Comcast executive and mother of 6 now knows only 2 levels of pain: excruciating and unbearable.
 
One of more than 1,000 on the waiting list at New Jersey’s sole legal dispensary for medical marijuana—Greenleaf Compassion Center—her patience is wearing thin. “I keep waiting for them to call,” she says. “I have my card. I’m ready to go. I passed.” Exhausted from the chronic pain that pulsates through her body day and night, she chokes up on the phone. “This is my body. I should be able to obtain any medicine that I deem OK for me. This is not the government’s right to decide!” Her audible anger is telling: Greenleaf won’t be calling anytime soon. There simply isn’t enough medical marijuana to go around in New Jersey—and she knows it.
 

Comments

California's medical marijuana wars spark up again

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, February, 4th 2013 by THCFinder
California's experiment with medical marijuana has sparked a hazy version of the old Not-in-My-Backyard syndrome.
 
From Hollister to Antioch, from Scotts Valley to Petaluma, from Seaside to Moraga, city after city has banned medical marijuana dispensaries, sending a message that even the sickest of patients must go elsewhere for that state-permitted dose of prescribed medical weed.
 
But on Tuesday, this fear-and-loathing approach to outlawing medical pot providers will face an unprecedented test in the California Supreme Court. The seven justices are to hear arguments on whether local governments can ban the dispensaries in view of the state's 1996 voter-approved law legalizing pot for medical use.
 
The case involves the Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center, which more than two years ago sued to block Riverside's dispensary ban, arguing that cities and counties cannot bar activities legal in California. A state appeals court sided with Riverside, and now the Supreme Court, faced with similar legal tangles across the state, has jumped into the fray.
 
The stakes are high in California's ongoing struggle pitting medical marijuana advocates against cities worried about problems associated with some of the dispensaries, such as lax control over the distribution of a drug that remains illegal under federal law.
 
"The Riverside case is a fascinating example of our 'laboratories of democracy' in action," said Julie Nice, a
 
law professor at the University of San Francisco, where the Supreme Court will hear the arguments. "It illustrates the difficulties created when each level of government ... stakes out a different regulatory position on a controversial subject."
The Bay Area, like the rest of California, is divided on the issue. San Francisco, San Jose, Oakland and Richmond have allowed certain numbers of dispensaries, even taxing their revenues, while large swaths of the region are dispensary-free zones.
 
Overall, there are at least 180 local government bans on medical marijuana dispensaries in California, about three dozen of them in the Bay Area, according to the marijuana advocacy group Americans for Safe Access. And that does not include moratoriums and regulations such as zoning limits, which medical marijuana supporters agree can be enforced.
 

Comments

Lawmakers mull marijuana limit for drivers

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Mon, February, 4th 2013 by THCFinder
DENVER • After three consecutive attempts to get a legal limit on the books for driving stoned, House Republican Leader Mark Waller says this is the year for a small compromise and legislative success.
 
“We needed it before with the proliferation of medical marijuana,” Waller, of Colorado Springs said. “We’re seeing traffic accidents and fatalities go up as it relates to marijuana being a factor. We need this legislation with the passage of Amendment 64, and we absolutely need to protect our citizens on Colorado roads.”
 
The bill faces two important hurdles Tuesday when it is heard in the House Judiciary Committee and the governor’s Amendment 64 task force will consider endorsing the legislation. The task force is responsible for recommending regulations to lawmakers for voter approved recreational marijuana use.
 
HB114 measure would define driving under the influence of marijuana as a driver’s blood containing 5 nanograms or more of the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, better known as THC.
 
Blood tests given after a DUI arrest can determine the level of active THC similar to a blood tests used to determine whether a driver’s blood exceeds the .08 blood alcohol limit for drunken driving.
 
Opponents of past marijuana-driving measures have said the THC limit can be erroneous. A person could be over the threshold, but not actually be high because of varying tolerance levels and effects of the drug.
 
Waller says this year he has a compromise that could draw enough support from Democrats to pass both the House and the Senate.
 
The compromise is a variance in how the law is written.
 
Now, if a driver tests over the .08 limit for alcohol in 100 milliliters of blood, they are presumed to be under the influence of alcohol. That presumption means in the court of law, the driver can only argue the test was inaccurate as a defense. Drivers cannot say they have a high tolerance and are not drunk at that threshold. Past laws have mirrored that for the DUI pot law.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
July 23, 2014 | Category: Culture
July 23, 2014 | Category: Culture
July 23, 2014 | Category: Nugs
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us