Search:
Login:
OR

Medical Marijuana

Oregon family uses medical marijuana to manage son's autistic rage

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, January, 24th 2013 by THCFinder
PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) -
An Oregon family has turned to medical marijuana to manage their son's severe autistic rage.
 
"It was indescribable, it was horrifying," said Jeremy Echols, father of 11-year-old Alex. "When you've got no other options, are you honestly gonna say no?"
 
Eleven-year-old Alex Echols is severely autistic, and his doctor said Alex's self-destructive behavior is brought on by Tuberous Sclerosis, a rare, genetic disorder that affects about 50,000 people in the U.S.  The disorder causes unregulated growth of non-malignant tissue in organs. In Alex's case, his neurologist said growths in Alex's brain have led to seizures and autism.
 
"Alex cannot communicate using words and that leads to behavior that is very frustrating for him and for those caring for him," said Dr. Colin Roberts, a pediatric neurologist at Doernbecher Children's Hospital in Portland.
 
Echols said by the time Alex was 5, he exhibited intense, self-directed rage. Echols showed us home videos of the rage. He said they videotaped the episodes to show doctors the injuries were self-inflicted.
 
Echols said Alex head butted anything he could. He said the boy bruised his forehead so badly, the blood would drain down until Alex's entire face was black and blue.  His parents got him a helmet to protect his head, swaddled him like a newborn and tried mood-altering drugs to control the behavior, with little success. 
 
Alex's daily, violent behavior became the Eugene family's new normal. When he was eight years old, the Echols made the heartbreaking decision to move Alex into a state-funded group home.
 
"It was like we were throwing him away, like we were giving him to somebody else and saying, 'Sorry buddy, you're not part of the family anymore,'" he said. "It was pretty rough."
 
But was there a way to help him? In late 2009, the Echols said they saw a television news story about a California woman who was using medical marijuana to treat her autistic son. The Echols researched Oregon's medical marijuana program, and in 2010, a doctor approved Alex for medical marijuana use.
 
"We tried the (marijuana) brownies, we tried butter for cookies," he said. 
 
Alex is now one of 58 minors currently protected under the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. While autism is not a qualifying medical condition like cancer or severe pain, in Alex's case, his seizures were.
 
And after a few months of treatment, the Echols said they saw a dramatic improvement.  
 
"He went from being completely, yelling, screaming, bloodying his face, to within an hour, hour and a half, he would be playing with toys, using his hands," he said. "Something that at that time was almost unheard of."
 
Echols said Alex's group home will not administer the marijuana, so, about three times a week off-site, his parents give Alex a liquid form of the drug by mouth.
 
The dosage is up to the parent and Oregon law does not require a doctor to monitor a child's medical marijuana use. In fact, Alex's neurologist didn't know about the alternative treatment, until we told him.
 
While Dr. Roberts did not condone the treatment, he said he understood the family's desire to help their child.
 
"Alex's parents are wonderful people." he said. "I certainly am very much with them in my desire to help Alex. All of us want to help Alex."
 

Comments

Battle lines redrawn in Arizona's medical marijuana fight

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Thu, January, 24th 2013 by THCFinder
PHOENIX -- Medical marijuana patients and supporters gathered at the Arizona State Capitol Building on Thursday morning to ask Rep. John Kavanagh, a Republican, to back down from his effort to repeal the medical marijuana law approved by voters in 2010.
 
Kavanagh said the program is loaded with abuse and that 10 percent of children are getting their marijuana from cardholders in the program.
 
"Ninety percent of the cardholders have chronic pain complaints," he said. "Hard to disprove, but easy to fake."
 
Kavanagh also said medical marijuana is dangerous and, until new studies prove otherwise, it should not be dispensed.
 
Greg Plunkett, who served in the Navy, suffers from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and seizure disorders. He couldn't disagree more with Kavanagh.
 
"I get this because I need the help," he said. "I'm standing here today because of medical marijuana."
 
Rebecca Perry, who has Multiple Sclerosis, said medical marijuana helps her and the dispensaries keep her from being forced to look for marijuana illegally.
 
"It keeps me from calling someone down on the corner that has some marijuana," he said. "Medical marijuana helps with the spasms I get. It helps a lot."
 
Perry and others believe Kavanagh wants to repeal the law in part because he doesn't know the difference between unregulated marijuana clubs and license dispensaries.
 
Source: http://ktar.com

Comments

Lawmakers renew efforts to bring medical marijuana to Texas

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Wed, January, 23rd 2013 by THCFinder
AUSTIN -- There are renewed efforts from lawmakers to bring medical marijuana to Texas.
 
State Representative Elliott Naishtat has introduced a bill to give patients using medical marijuana an affirmative defense in court.
 
House Bill 594 would protect patients if they are arrested on charges of marijuana possession.
 
Lawmakers have introduced similar measures in previous legislative sessions, but patients and advocates are still waiting for a hearing on the bill.
 
Lets hope Texas steps up and starts moving in the right direction for the patients in need.
 

Comments

Court rejects bid to have marijuana reclassified

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, January, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder

This is such complete bullshit it's beyond me how they can keep playing these games with peoples lives.

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court has rejected a petition to reclassify marijuana from its current status as a dangerous drug with no accepted medical use.

The appeals court panel Tuesday turned away the bid from a medical marijuana group, Americans for Safe Access.
 
Last year, the Drug Enforcement Administration rejected a petition by medical marijuana advocates to change the classification.
 
The court said that the question wasn’t whether marijuana could have some medical benefits, but rather whether the DEA’s decision was ‘‘arbitrary and capricious.’’ The court concluded that the DEA action survives review under that standard.
 
Marijuana is classified as a controlled substance, categorized as having a high potential for abuse and no currently accepted medical use, together with drugs like heroin, LSD and ecstasy.
 

Comments

Medical marijuana good for patients

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, January, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder
Two months after Colorado and Washington became the first American states to legalize recreational use of marijuana, a proposal to reform Iowa’s marijuana laws has come to the state House of Representatives.
 
Rep. Bruce Hunter, D-Des Moines, proposed the Medical Marijuana Act last week.
 
The Daily Iowan Editorial Board supports Hunter’s push for medical marijuana in Iowa; the current legal framework around the drug in Iowa is untenable, and this proposal would be the first step toward improvement. Passage of the Medical Marijuana Act would also be a major victory for patients in Iowa who are currently deprived of a legitimate means of treating some particularly debilitating conditions.
 
The law would legalize the possession and use of marijuana for patients suffering from a number of diseases including cancer, HIV, AIDS, ALS, Alzheimer’s, Crohn’s disease, and glaucoma. Patients with chronic, “intractable” pain or a condition characterized by persistent nausea would also be eligible to receive a prescription for medical marijuana.
 
The bill also includes provisions for the establishment of a licensing system for eligible patients and for the creation of nonprofit suppliers to sell marijuana to those licensed to buy.
 
“At this point, there’s no denying that marijuana helps alleviate the symptoms of a host of terrible diseases, many of which are notoriously difficult to treat,” Hunter said in a statement released through the Marijuana Policy Project. “There is a wealth of scientific evidence demonstrating marijuana is significantly less addictive and has far fewer severe side effects than the opiates and other narcotics these patients are taking now.”
 
The body of research concerning the efficacy of therapeutic marijuana and drugs derived from marijuana lends credence to Hunter’s claims that such drugs have proved to be both effective and safe when used responsibly.
 
According to an extensive summary of evidence produced by the Washington, D.C.-based NORML Foundation — an organization devoted to reforming America’s marijuana laws — cannabinoids (the class of chemical compounds that includes the chief psychoactive compound in marijuana) have a particularly impressive medicinal track record.
 
Cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit the growth of many types of cancers including breast cancer, skin cancer, and leukemia; they may also moderate the degenerative effects of autoimmune disorders.
 

Comments

Why does the Federal Government have a patent for Medical Marijuana?

Category: Medical Marijuana | Posted on Tue, January, 22nd 2013 by THCFinder
On the one hand, United States federal government officials have consistently denied that marijuana has any medical benefits. On the other, the government actually holds patents for the medical use of the plant.
 
Just check out US Patent 6630507 titled "Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants" which is assigned to The United States of America, as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services.
 
The patent claims that "Cannabinoids have been found to have antioxidant properties, unrelated to NMDA receptor antagonism. This new found property makes cannabinoids useful in the treatment and prophylaxis of wide variety of oxidation associated diseases, such as ischemic, age-related, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The cannabinoids are found to have particular application as neuroprotectants, for example in limiting neurological damage following ischemic insults, such as stroke and trauma, or in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and HIV dementia."
 
The patent was obtained in October of 2003.
 
Cannabinoids, for those who were wondering, are a group of chemical compounds found in marijuana that are also referred to as terpenophenolic compounds. One specific cannabinoid compound found in cannabis is tetrahydrocannabinol, more commonly known as THC. This substance gives marijuana its psychoactive effects.
 
Cannabis Sativa is the flower of a plant that is dried and smoked, vaporized, or ingested in food through cooking with canna-butter. When used the active chemical in the plant, thc, works in the brain causing the user to feel "high." This can be described and experienced in many different ways depending how it agrees or disagrees with the user. Most commonly effects are a feeling of a calm easy escape from the everyday stress on the mind, laughing, "munchies", as well as many other feelings.
 
The US government may hold this patent, but that will not stop their officials from consistently denying the benefits of medical marijuana. An FDA spokesperson, for instance, has claimed that "smoked marijuana has no currently accepted or proven medical use in the United States and is not an approved medical treatment."
 
I guess she didn't get the memo.
 

Comments


Search








Blog Categories

Popular Articles

Latest Offers In Your Area
Recent Blog Posts
Download Our App!
August 28, 2014 | Category: Nugs
August 28, 2014 | Category: News
August 28, 2014 | Category: Fun
Mobile Apps
Copyright 2014 THCFinder.com
All Rights Reserved.
Dispensaries      Strains      About Us      Friends      API / Widgets      Privacy Policy      Terms of Use      Investors      Contact Us