Colombia Supreme Court: Cultivating Up To 20 Marijuana Plants Is Not A Crime

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 19th 2015 by THCFinder

growing marijuanaThe decriminalization of marijuana possession in Colombia occurred awhile ago. Colombia is among a growing number of countries that have decriminalized personal marijuana possession and use. However, cultivation has been a different story. There are a lot of parts of the world that allow consumption and personal possession, but still consider cultivation a crime. Recently the Supreme Court in Colombia ruled that cultivation of up to 20 plants is not a crime. Per Colombia Reports:

Colombia’s Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that growing up to 20 plants of marijuana is not a crime. The possession of small amounts of the drug had already been decriminalized.

The court ruled on the private cultivation of marijuana in an appeal filed by a man who had been sentenced to more than five years in prison after he had been caught by police with a recently cut plant weighing 124 grams.

The maximum amount of marijuana that can legally be carried is 20 grams in Colombia.

However, because the plant was meant for personal consumption, the court confirmed that there is no crime unless a person cultivates more than 20 plants.

The court ruling further decriminalizes the cultivation and possession of the drug for personal use. 

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Pot-Related Summonses on the Rise in NYC, Especially in Minority Neighborhoods

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 18th 2015 by THCFinder

New York City’s posh Upper East Side and East Harlem are mere subway stops apart, but if you live in East Harlem and are black or Latino, you’re 112 times more likely to be arrested for marijuana possession, despite Mayor Bill de Blasio’s campaign promises to end discriminatory policing.  

Are they smoking more pot than their Caucasian counterparts, one might ask? Nope. A 2011National Survey found that Latino and African Americans are less likely to use marijuana than white people.

So what gives in neighborhoods like East New York, Brooklyn, population under 200,000, less than 10 percent white and 35 percent living below the poverty line? East New Yorkers have received the second-highest number of pot possession summonses in New York City. 

The NYPD has issued more than 3,800 pot-related violations in New York City in just the first three months of this year, according to amNew York, putting the force on track to roundly exceed last year’s 13,377 summonses issued. Possessing up to 25 grams of marijuana in private is not a crime in New York State. 

Race and class disparities in drug law enforcement extend across all of New York City, according to areport published by the Drug Policy Alliance that analyzed the cases of 15,324 people arrested for low-level pot possession between March-August of 2014.  

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Charges Dropped Against Women Who Was Sexually Assaulted During Marijuana Search

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 18th 2015 by THCFinder
charneshia corley marijuana

(image via CNN)

One of the most disgusting stories that I have read about all year is the story of Charneshia Corley, who was sexually assaulted by law enforcement during a search for marijuana. The search didn’t occur in a private room at the police headquarters. It occurred in public view in a Texaco parking lot. I cannot fathom how one human could do that to another human, especially in the name of marijuana prohibition. Charneshia was accused of a traffic violation, and moments later a law enforcement officer is probing her private parts for all to see. That’s absolutely horrific. Below is a description of what happened, via the Huffington Post:

“They sexually assaulted, raped me and molested me,” Corley told The Huffington Post on Monday.

Her attorney, Samuel Cammack III, told HuffPost the two deputies asked Corley to remove her pants in full view of passersby.

“She said, ‘No, I don’t have any panties on,’ so the officer told her to bend over and she pulled her pants down for her and went to stick her hand inside of Ms. Corely,” Cammack said.

Corley resisted and the deputies forced her face-first to the ground, Cammack said. The female deputy then climbed onto Corley’s back and pinned her, while the officers awaited the arrival of a second female deputy, according to the lawyer. After the second female deputy arrived, the two women officers held Corley down and forcibly spread her legs, Cammack said. 

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This Canadian University Offers a Class on the Business of Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 18th 2015 by THCFinder

Students at Kwantlen Polytechnic University can now sign up for a class with high stakes: the school in British Columbia is offering a course called “Introduction to Professional Management of Marijuana for Medical Purposes in Canada.”

The class will take place online over 14 weeks, the CBC reports. Since the legality of marijuana is being fought out in the courts in Canada (currently it is only approved for medicinal use, and regulations vary by region), the course will focus on educating students about following the rules to grow a legitimate business. Only 25 growing facilities are currently federally licensed in the country.

Similar courses have already popped up throughout the U.S.: the University of Denver Sturm College of Law offered a class on “Representing the Marijuana Client”; Vanderbilt University School of Law taught “Marijuana Law and Policy”; and Harvard University Law School taught “Tax Planning for Marijuana Dealers.”



Marijuana games in S.F. aim to change stoner stereotypes

Category: News | Posted on Sun, August, 16th 2015 by THCFinder

SAN FRANCISCO — Students, accountants, businessmen, housewives and many others in green T-shirts and all wearing the number 420 raced Saturday to change the stereotypical images of marijuana smokers as lazy and lethargic stoners who binge on junk food.

More than 300 people came from throughout the San Francisco Bay Area to participate in the 420 Games, an effort to stop the stigmatization of cannabis use through athletic events.

"People who use marijuana have been classified as dumb, lazy, stupid people and with this race we're showing them we're not what they say we are," said Jim McAlpine, a snowboard company executive who founded the events last year. "We want to show them we are motivated, athletic members of society."

The origins of the number 420 as a code for marijuana are murky, but fans have long marked April 20 as a day to enjoy pot and call for increased legal access to the drug.

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Rauner uses veto to call for changes to marijuana decriminalization bill

Category: News | Posted on Sat, August, 15th 2015 by THCFinder

Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner on Friday used his veto powers to rewrite a bill aimed at decriminalizing possession of small amounts of marijuana, saying the measure that lawmakers sent him would let people carry too much pot and sets fines too low.
Rauner said while he supports the "fundamental purposes" of keeping people out of jail and cutting court costs, such a significant change in drug laws "must be made carefully and incrementally." Sponsors of the bill pushed back, saying the changes are "low-hanging fruit" when it comes to reforming the criminal justice system and contending the governor is working against his own goal of reducing the number of prison inmates.
Under the proposal, people caught with up to 15 grams of marijuana — about the equivalent of 25 cigarette-sized joints — would not go to court but instead receive fines ranging from $55 to $125. Rauner said those standards were too lax and the threshold should be lowered to 10 grams and fines should range from $100 to $200.



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