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Vermont Marijuana Decriminalization Law Goes Into Effect

Category: News | Posted on Tue, July, 2nd 2013 by THCFinder
vermont-mmjStarting Monday, Vermonters will not be arrested for possessing less than an ounce of marijuana.
 
The decriminalization law, signed by Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin (D) last month, will remove criminal penalties on small amounts of cannabis and replace them with civil fines.
 
According to the new measure, first-time offenders will not get more than a $200 fine for possession. The fine will increase for repeat offenders -- $300 for a second offense and $500 for every offense thereafter -- but, under the law, marijuana possession will no longer result in the creation of a criminal record.
 
Possession of more than an ounce of marijuana remains a criminal offense, and state law still forbids the cultivation of cannabis plants.
 
“This is a much-needed step forward toward a more sensible marijuana policy,” said Matt Simon, legislative analyst for the Marijuana Policy Project. “Nobody should be subjected to life-altering criminal penalties simply for possessing a substance that is objectively less harmful than alcohol.”
 
Vermont legalized medical marijuana in 2004, and now joins 14 other states that have adopted decriminalization laws for non-medical cannabis. In 2012, voters in two additional states, Washington and Colorado, approved ballot measures to tax and legalize marijuana for recreational use among those 21 years old and above.
 

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Retail marijuana labels in Colorado will have to include potency, expiration dates, safety warning

Category: News | Posted on Tue, July, 2nd 2013 by THCFinder
lab-tested-mjDENVER - Colorado has announced detailed rules for how recreational pot should be grown and sold starting next year.
 
The state department that will regulate marijuana released more than 60 pages of rules Monday for how marijuana sales will be licensed and regulated. The Colorado Legislature set broad parameters earlier this year, but the nitty-gritty rules were left to the Department of Revenue.
 
The voter-approved marijuana legalization measure adopted last year required the department to release rules by July 1. Retail sales don't start until January, and the newly released rules don't apply to medical pot shops.
 
The rules require labels to include potency, expiration dates, and a disclaimer that pot isn't legal outside Colorado and hasn't been safety-tested.
 

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Rules For Legal Recreational Marijuana Sales Announced In Colorado

Category: News | Posted on Mon, July, 1st 2013 by THCFinder
co-marijuana-rulesThe Colorado Department of Revenue released a 60-plus page report Monday detailing the rules of how recreational marijuana should be licensed, regulated and sold in Colorado.
 
The recreational marijuana industry in Colorado will be regulated by the state revenue department.
 
The state department report sets very specific rules for recreational marijuana in Colorado from licensing to how a retail marijuana store should operate to how retail grow operations should function to marijuana testing to marketing and to labeling of marijuana products.
 
Safe product testing and proper labeling were two of the key areas the Department of Revenue needed to provide rules on by today's deadline and the report provides ample detail.
 
Labels must conform to the specific language requirements of the state including information on potency, amount of THC in the marijuana product, a clear set of instructions on how to properly use the product, a complete list of nonorganic pesticides, fungicides and herbicides used during cultivation and much more depending on the type of product which can range from marijuana buds for smoking, a marijuana-laced food or a THC-concentrate like a marijuana "wax."
 

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Taco Bell, Del Taco Unahppy About Names Being Used in Marijuana Expo Ad

Category: News | Posted on Sun, June, 30th 2013 by THCFinder
kushexpo-problemsDespite the fact that potheads love Taco Bell, Taco Bell is not cool with being associated with weed in advertisements. Neither a Taco Bell nor a Del Taco in Orange County, Calif. want their names associated with a marijuana expo set for next week in Anaheim. The Kush Expo will blow through the Anaheim Convention Center on Jul. 6 and Jul. 7, and both taco chains are mentioned in promos. They aren't having it.
 
Del Taco spokeswoman Barbara Caruso said "It's unacceptable for companies to use our logo without permission and they didn't have permission." Rob Poetsch, spokesman for Taco Bell, voiced similar frustrations. "We have a longstanding policy that prohibits other businesses from using our trademarks, and we did not give them permission to do this."
 
Poetsch added that Taco Bell was "in the process of contacting them to take down our trademarks from their website, but it appears that they have already taken them down." The Kush Expo is advertised as "the world's biggest medical marijuana mega show," with prizes, giveaways and even a "Hot Kush Girl" contest. That sounds like a stoner's paradise, but Taco Bell and Del Taco will have no official affiliation.
 

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California Supreme Court Decides Police Need Warrant to Open Package That Smells Like Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Sat, June, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
warrent-for-semelly-boxes
Yesterday, the California Supreme Court decided that police needed to secure a warrant to open a package that smelled like marijuana. Santa Barbara County prosecutors argued that packages should be searched using the "plain smell" logic, and extension of the "plain sight" rule which allows authorities to seize and search anything clearly visible. 
 
Authorities were allowed to seize package, they just needed a warrant to open it. This all stems from a case where a FedEx package contained 444 grams of marijuana; the sender was accused of shipping and selling it. Police seized the package after a FedEx employee complained that it reeked of marijuana and later opened it at the police station.
 
The case's defendant is definitely happy, as the evidence has to be suppressed because it wasn't searched lawfully. 
 

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Marijuana's march toward mainstream confounds feds

Category: News | Posted on Sat, June, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
feds-confusedWASHINGTON—It took 50 years for American attitudes about marijuana to zigzag from the paranoia of "Reefer Madness" to the excesses of Woodstock back to the hard line of "Just Say No."
 
The next 25 years took the nation from Bill Clinton, who famously "didn't inhale," to Barack Obama, who most emphatically did.
 
Now, in just a few short years, public opinion has moved so dramatically toward general acceptance that even those who champion legalization are surprised at how quickly attitudes are changing and states are moving to approve the drug—for medical use and just for fun.
 
It is a moment in America that is rife with contradictions:
—People are looking more kindly on marijuana even as science reveals more about the drug's potential dangers, particularly for young people.
—States are giving the green light to the drug in direct defiance of a federal prohibition on its use.
—Exploration of the potential medical benefit is limited by high federal hurdles to research.
Washington policymakers seem reluctant to deal with any of it.
Richard Bonnie, a University of Virginia law professor who worked for a national commission that recommended decriminalizing marijuana in 1972, sees the public taking a big leap from prohibition to a more laissez-faire approach without full deliberation.
 
"It's a remarkable story historically," he says. "But as a matter of public policy, it's a little worrisome."
 

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