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THC Increases Brain Activity In Response To Positive Stimuli

Category: News | Posted on Mon, September, 23rd 2013 by THCFinder
thc-brain-supportLondon, United Kingdom: The administration of THC, the primary psychoactive component in cannabis, modulates emotional processing in healthy volunteers, according to placebo-controlled crossover trial data published online by the journal European Neuropsychopharmacology.
 
Investigators from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 11 healthy male subjects. Following the administration of THC or placebo, researchers assessed subjects’ brain activity during their exposure to stimuli with a negative (‘fearful faces’) content or a positive content (‘happy faces’). They hypothesized that THC administration would reduce subjects’ negative bias in emotional processing and shift it towards a positive bias. A bias toward negative stimuli has been linked to diagnoses of certain mental illnesses such as depression.
 
As anticipated, authors reported reduced brain activity after THC administration when subjects’ processed stimuli with a negative emotional content. Conversely, researchers reported increased brain activity following THC administration when subjects’ processed stimuli with a positive emotional content.
 
They concluded: “These results indicate that THC administration reduces the negative bias in emotional processing. This adds human evidence to support the hypothesis that the endocannabinoid system is involved in modulation of emotional processing. Our findings also suggest a possible role for the endocannabinoid system in abnormal emotional processing, and may thus be relevant for psychiatric disorders such as major depression.”
 
For more information, please contact Paul Armentano, NORML Deputy Director, at: paul@norml.org. Full text of the study, “The endocannabinoid system and emotional processing: A pharmacological fMRI study with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol,” will appear in European Neurophyscopharmacology.
 

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Family credits rare medical marijuana with helping epileptic son

Category: News | Posted on Mon, September, 23rd 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-helps-healA California family says a rare type of medical marijuana has helped control their 7-year-old son’s severe epilepsy, Fox 40 reported.
 
Jayden David suffers from a debilitating form of epilepsy, which causes him to experience frequent seizures – some lasting up to 90 minutes. Until recently, Jayden took up to 20 types of medication every day in an attempt to control his condition.
 
However, when Jayden’s father, Jason David, discovered cannabidiol (CBD), a rare type of non-psychotic medical marijuana, he said it changed the young boy’s life.
 
David said the CBD, which he administers to his son in liquid form, has improved Jayden’s condition dramatically, reducing the number of seizures he suffers and allowing him to cut back on his medications.
 
“Jayden’s seizures are down approximately 80 percent. Jayden is functioning now,” David, of Modesto, Calif., told Fox 40. “The doctors told me Jayden would never walk or talk.”
 
However, the family says the drug is difficult to obtain – especially since the one pharmacy dispensing it in Modesto was shut down.
 
On Tuesday, David plans to appeal to the town’s city council to make it easier for his family to obtain CBD.
 
“It is a life and death situation for our children. We are parents, not pot heads. I consider myself a caregiver. I should not have to feel like a criminal,” David said.
 

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Gov. Rick Snyder and Attorney General say no to Lansing marijuana proposal

Category: News | Posted on Sat, September, 21st 2013 by THCFinder
lansing-gets-noLANSING – The marijuana legalization proposal that was approved by the city of Lansing on August 27 will remain on the November ballot despite a notice from the state Attorney General saying the amendment would violate state law.
 
The Lansing City Pulse is reporting that Attorney General Bill Shuette notified Gov. Rick Snyder on Sept. 10 that Lansing's the amendment "is not consistent" with Michigan's Home Rule Cities Act. The rule says that the state must review local ballot proposals.
 
"Regardless of whether the proposed amendment is approved by the voters, marijuana will remain a controlled substance under state and federal law," Matthew Schneider, the Attorney General's chief legal counsel, wrote. "City law enforcement will retain the authority to enforce criminal laws, without regard to any provision in the charter.
 
The letter adds: "No city charter provision 'shall conflict with or contravene the provisions of any general law of the state.'"  The letter also said that the ballot proposal also "does not inform the voters that the proposed amendment conflicts with state law" and that it does "not inform the voters that state law will control regardless of whether the proposed amendment is adopted."
 
City Clerk Chris Swope said that Snyder responded on Monday and said that he agreed with the attorney general's decision.
 
"Because of the inconsistency with state law identified in the attached letter from the Attorney General's Office, I do not approve the proposed revised charter amendment," Snyder said in the letter. Swope said that City Attorney Janene McIntyre has reviewed the matter and told him that the proposal will stay on the ballot.
 

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Judge rules against Lansing couple in child-welfare case involving medical marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Sat, September, 21st 2013 by THCFinder
judge-rules-against-lansing-coupleA judge on Friday ruled against a Lansing couple who claimed their child was improperly removed from their care in a case involving medical marijuana.
 
Ingham County Probate Judge Richard Garcia said a referee had probable cause to place 6-month-old Brielle “Bree” Green in the care of the state Department of Human Services.
 
But Garcia said parents Gordon and Maria Green can have unlimited visitation with the child, who has been placed with her maternal grandmother.
 
Acting on a petition by state caseworkers, a family court referee on Sept. 13 placed the child in the care of DHS pending a trial next month.
 
The Greens and other medical marijuana advocates said the state’s actions violated protections in the state’s medical marijuana law. Maria Green is a registered medical marijuana caregiver and was legally growing the drug in her home, they said.
 
Caseworkers said there were allegations marijuana was being used in the presence of children. The Greens deny those assertions.
 
A jury trial is set for Oct. 7 on whether the state should have jurisdiction over the child.
 

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Washington Supreme Court OKs medical marijuana necessity

Category: News | Posted on Fri, September, 20th 2013 by THCFinder
wa-supreme-court-rules-for-mj-useSEATTLE – People busted for marijuana can argue they needed it for medical reasons, even if they failed to follow the requirements of the state’s medical marijuana law, the Washington Supreme Court said Thursday.
 
In a 5-4 opinion hailed by advocates of patients who use pot, the justices said voters did not get rid of the “medical necessity defense” when they passed the medical marijuana law in 1998.
 
The ruling means that people who don’t have the money or insurance to see a doctor to authorize them to use marijuana, or who don’t have a doctor in their community who will authorize them to use marijuana, will nevertheless be able to argue in court that they had a medical reason for using it, said Seattle lawyer Suzanne Lee Elliott, who handled the case.
 
The state medical marijuana law allows people to use pot for certain debilitating medical conditions, such as cancer, AIDS or intractable pain, and it allows them to have far more of the drug than the ounce adults are allowed to possess under Washington’s recreational marijuana law, approved last year. People are required to obtain an authorization to use marijuana from an appropriate health care professional before they can avail themselves of the medical law.
 
Chief Justice Barbara Madsen wrote for the majority that people who fail to follow the medical law can nevertheless argue in court that they needed the marijuana for medical reasons, but in order to do so, they must also show that complying with the medical marijuana law was not a viable alternative for them.
 
That is frequently the case with people who use pot to treat conditions that aren’t covered by the medical marijuana law, such as insomnia, Seattle marijuana defense attorney Douglas Hiatt said. If prosecuted, they’ll be able to make a case at trial that they needed the pot for their condition.
 

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FBI Study Shows Record High Marijuana Arrests Continue Despite Changing Attitudes

Category: News | Posted on Thu, September, 19th 2013 by THCFinder
arrests-for-mj-on-the-riseWASHINGTON, D.C. — Marijuana arrests continued at near record levels in 2012, and the vast majority of them were for simple possession. According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s annual Uniform Crime Report, an estimated 749,824 arrests were made nationwide for marijuana, more than 87% of which were for possession. This is a slight decrease from 2011. Marijuana arrests accounted for nearly half of all drug arrests last year.
 
The report also noted that 59.9% of rapes, 53.2% of all violent crimes, and 81% of property crimes reported in 2012 were unsolved or did not result in arrest.
 
These results show that one person is arrested for marijuana possession every 48 seconds on average in the United States. A Pew Research Poll released in April reported that a majority of Americans think marijuana should be taxed and regulated in a manner similar to alcohol.
 
“Instead of punishing and stigmatizing responsible adult marijuana users, we should be focusing on serious crime,” said Dan Riffle, director of federal policies for the Marijuana Policy Project in a statement released Tuesday.  ”As a former prosecuting attorney myself, I believe it is irresponsible to squander our limited law enforcement resources on this disastrous public policy failure. That is especially true when so many violent crimes remain unsolved. Every second spent arresting and prosecuting adults for marijuana is time that could have been spent preventing and solving real crimes.”
 
“There is no greater waste of valuable taxpayer dollars than branding hundreds of thousands of otherwise law-abiding citizens as criminals simply for choosing to use a substance less harmful than alcohol. Given the fact that most Americans support taxing and regulating marijuana like alcohol, I suggest our police and prosecutors find a better use of their time.”
 

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