Philip Victor Williamson, Long Beach Murder Victim, Killed Over Medical Marijuana?

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 2nd 2011 by THCFinder

We all hope the criminal who took this mans life will be caught and prosecuted!

UPDATED, AUG. 1, 1 P.M.: The Long Beach Police Department is offering $10,000 to anyone with information that leads to the arrest of whoever is responsible for the murder of Philip Victory Wiliamson. According to, the award was proposed by LA County Supervisor Don Knabe, and that investigators believe Williamson, who is believed to have been a marijuana deliveryman, might have had up to $500,000 in cash on him when he died.

Anyone with information should call Long Beach PD homicide detectives Scott Lasch or Donald Goodman at 562-570-7244. Anonymity guaranteed.
UPDATED, JULY 12, 1 P.M.: The Long Beach Police Department has now released surveillance footage from a local liquor store that they hope may lead them to a person of interest in the murder of Philip Victor Williamson, a former Chico resident police suspect may have been killed because of his role as a long-distance marijuana hauler. 
The footage shows a man in a black sweatshirt and black pants making a purchase inside the store. He left in the black 2002 Toyota 4Runner described below. More interestingly, the press release accompanying the new footage finally provides an indication as to why the cops want to find the mystery SUV driver: it turns out that the receipt from this man's purchase at the liquor store was found in Williamson's residence.
Call the number after the jump if you have any useful information to share with investigators.


Suspect Arrested For Smoking Pot Outside Police Department

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 2nd 2011 by THCFinder
Ok this is exactly what you don't do... use your brain people common now. Or atleast don't get caught...
SOUTH HOUSTON, Texas - Police did not have to go far to arrest a drug possession suspect this week as he was found in their parking lot smoking marijuana on Monday.
Charles Powell, 33, has been arrested more than a half-dozen times over the years, but police said his latest bust happened right outside the police station.
According to police, Powell was standing by his car when he decided to relax with a marijuana cigarette and a beer -- across the street from the city of South Houston's police department on July 25.
A South Houston detective was on his way to lunch when Chief Herbert Gilbert said the detective smelled marijuana.
"The detective came out the rear entry," Gilbert said. According to the chief, Powell was in front of a sign clearly marked "police" smoking what appeared to be a cigar, but was actually a cigar filled with marijuana.
"He was here with a friend who was visiting someone in our jail," Gilbert said.
The detective confronted Powell. "In 21 years, this is a first. I've seen a lot of things, but never encountered someone smoking a marijuana cigarette in a police parking lot," Gilbert said.
Powell would not appear on camera, but said by phone that he wasn't smoking marijuana, just a cigarette.
He's facing a Class B misdemeanor for possession of marijuana and up to 180 days in jail if he's convicted.


Franklin man faces prison term for growing pot to blunt pain from MS

Category: News | Posted on Mon, August, 1st 2011 by THCFinder
You have to wonder: Are the authorities and courts high? John Ray Wilson, it appears, is going to prison for growing 17 marijuana plants behind his home in Franklin Township. An appeals court last week tossed out a last-ditch attempt at overturning his conviction.
Now, 17 plants — some as tall as an NBA player — are a lot of pot, but Wilson suffers from multiple sclerosis, had no health insurance, his lawyer says, and grew the weed to help him alleviate the symptoms of his illness. Okay, so maybe he overplanted.
We know what you’re going to say: No one person could possibly smoke that much pot.
Heck, Wilson could have thrown a party, invited Cheech and Chong, Spicoli, Bill Maher and all of San Francisco — and still would have had a few doobies left over. So, Wilson must’ve been dealing.
But there’s no evidence of that.
Wilson was acquitted of maintaining or operating a drug-production facility (a possible 20-year offense), but found guilty of manufacturing and possessing the drug.
At his trial, Wilson was not allowed to tell the jury that he grew the pot to relieve his symptoms, nor was he permitted to present an expert witness on the benefits of marijuana.
He appealed those points, but lost.
Of course, had New Jersey passed a medical marijuana law sooner, Wilson wouldn’t have had to resort to backyard farming in 2009.
The court followed the law to the letter, but at some point, someone must step in and stop the craziness of this case. Because it’s totally bogus, dude.


Sheriff heads to U.S. Supreme Court over pot patient's concealed weapons permit

Category: News | Posted on Thu, July, 28th 2011 by THCFinder
Jackson County Sheriff Mike Winters has appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court in his latest bid to block issuing concealed handgun licenses to medical marijuana users.
Winters has asserted that he can't issue the concealed handgun license because it would violate federal law, specifically the Gun Control Act of 1968.
The sheriff's legal argument has been shot down by every court so far, including the Jackson County Circuit Court, the Oregon Court of Appeals and the Oregon Supreme Court.
Cynthia Townsley Willis, who uses cannabis for muscle spasms and arthritis pain and has a clean criminal record, admitted to using medical marijuana when she filed her application with the sheriff for a concealed handgun license in 2008. The sheriff denied her application, claiming that her possession of a medical marijuana card indicated she was a drug user. Willis has a concealed weapon's license, which Winters approved after the Oregon Court of Appeals ruled against him.


New test can detect Marijuana in your fingerprints

Category: News | Posted on Wed, July, 27th 2011 by THCFinder
A new technology that analyzes the sweat from a person's fingertips looks to revolutionize the drug testing market, providing on-site results in minutes with a test so advanced it can even detect marijuana intoxication.
Using gold nanoparticles and special antibodies, the tech produced by British firm Intelligent Fingerprinting latches on to metabolites on the fingerprint and turns a specific color depending on which drug byproducts are detected.
While it can be configured to search for drugs like nicotine, methadone and cocaine, it also presents another innovation: helping to determine if someone is actively intoxicated on marijuana.
Marijuana's psychoactive ingredient is fat soluble, so it stays in the body for weeks locked in fat cells. This means that traditional drug testing using urine analysis can detect whether a person has used marijuana up to a month afterwards, but it doesn't actually reveal if the person was intoxicated at the time the test was taken.
The fingerprint test, on the other hand, can detect minuscule amounts of broken-down drug compounds in metabolites in just minutes, pointing to whether that person was stoned or not. The development leads to a breakthrough that could result in more accurate testing to determine whether a person is driving while drugged.
The device was first announced last week, during the UCL International Crime Science Conference.


Man with MS given 5 year prison sentence for growing Marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Tue, July, 26th 2011 by THCFinder
 An appellate court has upheld the conviction and prison sentence of a Franklin man who was arrested for growing marijuana that he used to treat symptoms of his multiple sclerosis.
The ruling issued Tuesday morning rejects John Ray Wilson’s appeal that he was entitled to a “personal use defense” at trial and that his five-year state prison sentence was excessive.
Wilson, 38, was arrested in August 2008 after a National Guard helicopter pilot spotted his marijuana patch behind his rented home on Skillmans Lane in Franklin. His attorney has said he began growing his own marijuana to treat the symptoms of MS because he did not have insurance and could not afford prescriptions.
But a trial judge in 2009 barred Wilson from asserting the personal use defense and from referencing his medical condition at trial. He was convicted in December of that year of second-degree manufacturing marijuana plants and third-degree possession of psilocybin mushrooms, then sentenced the following March.
Wilson was released from prison on $15,000 bail pending an appeal of his conviction.
On Tuesday, the three-judge appellate panel wrote that it found no abuse of discretion or error of judgment by the trial court.
“Although we sympathize with defendant's medical condition, the record is devoid of any evidence that he will not obtain satisfactory medical treatment while incarcerated,” the judges wrote in the 15-page opinion. “As a result, we agree with the trial court's determination that there are no extraordinary mitigating factors in this case.”
His conviction and subsequent sentence drew outcry from medical marijuana advocates and state senators, who called for him to be pardoned by then-Gov. Jon S. Corzine and then Gov. Chris Christie.
The court’s decision comes about a week after Christie announced he would allow the state to begin dispensing marijuana to patients who demonstrate a medical need. He had held off on implementing the law since it was signed in January 2010 by Corzine, citing concerns about potential abuses of the program and prosecution by federal authorities.



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