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Seattle's second marijuana retailer plans to open Tuesday!

Category: News | Posted on Fri, September, 26th 2014 by THCFinder
seattles-second-mj-storeFinally! Seattle’s second I-502, legal marijuana retailer is getting ready to open at 23rd Ave. and E. Union St. in Seattle next week.
 
Ian Eisenberg, the owner of “Uncle Ike’s” at 2310 East Union St., confirmed today that his shop is licensed and while they have “a million things that have to all come together in the meantime” they’re planning on opening Tuesday.
 
And, well, that’s all we have for now. We’ll be talking with them next week and will fill in all the details then.
 
So, for now Seattle … You’ll soon have Uncle Ike’s to buy legal weed from in addition to Cannabis City. There are of course retailers in Bothell, Tacoma, Bellingham and more. Check out the gallery above for what’s open and where.
 
The revenue picture
 
Meanwhile, according to the latest published figures from the Liquor Control Board, legal weed in Washington has grossed more than $16 million with more than $4 million in taxes going to the state.
 
There are 233 growers licensed so far, exceeding the state’s goal of 2 million square feet of canopy. While there have been supply issues over the summer, most expect the legal cannabis market to have a solid supply chain — including infused products such as edibles, drinks and hash oils — by Thanksgiving.
 
The state’s goal for this first round of licenses is to capture roughly a quarter of the marijuana market. Seems we’re slowly but surely heading in that direction … though there’s plenty of black and grey market growers, sellers and buyers who insist the legal stores won’t knock them out of the market, especially Seattle’s essentially open market.
 

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Seattle tosses out marijuana tickets

Category: News | Posted on Tue, September, 23rd 2014 by THCFinder
seattle-tossing-our-marijuana-ticketsSEATTLE – The city has torn up nearly 90 citations given to people accused of publicly smoking marijuana after an investigation revealed a single cop wrote most of them.
 
Seattle officials on Monday dismissed the tickets over concerns Officer Randy Jokela was unfairly and arbitrarily targeting the homeless and African-Americans. On one of the tickets, Jokela wrote a note indicating he had flipped a coin about who to give the ticket to. Jokela was temporarily reassigned and faces an internal affairs investigation.
 
"The police do not write the laws. They enforce the laws," said Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes. "You can't be a legislator out on the street."
 
Seattle has decriminalized simple marijuana possession, and the state of Washington permits both recreational and medical marijuana consumption and possession. Public consumption, however, remains illegal.
 
It's unclear, city officials said, whether Jokela was simply aggressively handing out legitimate tickets or if he was just making up the charges because he objected to the decriminalization and legalization of marijuana in Seattle. Jokela is accused of writing 80% of the marijuana tickets in the first six months of the year.
 
The city formally voided the 86 tickets on Monday morning.
 
Holmes, who backed the campaigns to decriminalize and then legalize marijuana, said Jokela's seemingly arbitrary approach to writing tickets was "abhorrent." He said social justice requires the law be applied evenly, and on Monday announced a new police policy aimed at educating users first before issuing them a ticket.
 

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Reporter Quits On Live TV After Revealing That She Owns a Marijuana Club

Category: News | Posted on Mon, September, 22nd 2014 by THCFinder
reporter-quits-live-on-airA local news segment went up in smoke when a reporter quit her job on air after making a rather surprising announcement Sunday night. Charlo Greene, a reporter for KTVA-TV in Anchorage, Alaska, revealed that she’s the owner of the Alaska Cannabis Club, a business that connects medical marijuana cardholders in need of ganj with medical marijuana cardholders in possession of ganj.
 
In the above clip (which contains a bit of NSFW language) Greene says she will be dedicating all her energy toward “fighting for freedom and fairness, which begins with legalizing marijuana here in Alaska.” Then she adds, “And as for this job, well, not that I have a choice, but f–k it. I quit.”
 
The station soon apologized on Facebook:
 
Dear Viewers,
We sincerely apologize for the inappropriate language used by a KTVA reporter during her live presentation on the air tonight. The employee has been terminated.
Bert Rudman
News Director – KTVA 11 News
Now we’re left with just one question: can someone really be “terminated” after saying “F–k it, I quit?”
 
Greene herself also took to social media on Monday to explain herself. She shared the following video on the Alaska Cannabis Club’s YouTube page to offer more insight into her decision to quit, to debunk myths about marijuana legalization and to share her passion for the cause:
 
Read more: https://time.com

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Stoners on the job: Nearly 10% of Americans went to work high

Category: News | Posted on Fri, September, 19th 2014 by THCFinder
workers-getting-high-on-the-jobShowing up to work high? You're not alone.
 
A new report has found nearly 1 in 10 Americans are showing up to work high on marijuana. Mashable.com conducted the survey in partnership with SurveyMonkey, and found 9.7 percent of Americans fessed up to smoking cannabis before showing up to the office.
 
The data analyzed the marijuana and prescription drug habits of 534 Americans. What's more, nearly 81 percent said they scored their cannabis illegally, according to the survey.
 
Cannabis and the workplace seem quite linked lately. Entrepreneur and venture capitalist Peter Thiel recently chimed in on marijuana and work. While criticizing Twitter during an appearance on CNBC Wednesday, Thiel said Twitter is a "… horribly mismanaged company—probably a lot of pot smoking going on there."
 
According to separate data from Employers, a small-business insurance company, 10 percent of small businesses reported that employees showed up in 2013 under the influence of at least one controlled substance, with marijuana coming in at 5.1 percent.
 
Marijuana sales overall are taking off as recreational use of cannabis is legal in Colorado and Washington state, and pot can be purchased for medicinal use in 23 states and Washington, D.C.
 
So what's an employer to do?
Companies have different strategies and opinions on testing. But the vast majority of U.S. employers aren't required to test for drugs. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, many state and local governments have statutes that "limit or prohibit workplace testing, unless required by state or Federal regulations for certain jobs."
 

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United States House Passes "No Welfare For Weed" Bill

Category: News | Posted on Thu, September, 18th 2014 by THCFinder
no-welfare-for-weedApparently the United States House of Representatives thinks there is an epidemic of people using welfare money to buy recreational marijuana. I personally haven’t heard of anyone doing it in Washington and Colorado. Welfare money is always a hot-button issue in Washington D.C. and throughout America. Late yesterday the House of Representatives passed a bill that would make it harder for people to use welfare money to buy marijuana. Per ABC News:
 
The House passed a bill Tuesday that could make it a little harder for people to use government welfare payments to buy marijuana in states where the drug is legal.
 
Supporters call it the “no welfare for weed” bill.
 
The bill would prevent people from using government-issued welfare debit cards to make purchases at stores that sell marijuana. It would also prohibit people from using the cards to withdraw cash from ATMs in those stores.
 
A 2012 federal law already prevents people from using welfare debit cards at liquor stores, casinos and strip clubs.
 
The bill is limited in that it only prevents someone from withdrawing money or making a direct purchase at a marijuana store. To get around the law, all someone has to do is withdraw money from an ATM that is not located at a marijuana store. I have a much more solid way to ensure people aren’t using welfare money to buy recreational marijuana – legalize marijuana cultivation for all Americans. If people could grow a few marijuana plants themselves, the need to buy marijuana at stores (with welfare money or otherwise) would be reduced dramatically. But I don’t think Congress will go for that. This bill targets marijuana consumers and those on welfare, two areas of American society that politicians love to go after. I don’t see them giving up on that anytime soon.
 

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Marijuana ad campaign promotes responsible consumption

Category: News | Posted on Thu, September, 18th 2014 by THCFinder
mj-ad-consume-responsibleA new campaign urging responsible marijuana use is being rolled out Wednesday to counter hyperbolic anti-drug advertisements of the past — which were mostly blowing smoke.
 
"Consume Responsibly" is the first-ever comprehensive public education campaign about using — and not abusing — the drug.
 
"For decades marijuana education in this country has been based on scaring adults away from using marijuana. Now that marijuana is becoming legal in states around the country, it's time for a more realistic and honest approach," Mason Tvert, a spokesman for the Marijuana Policy Project, told the Daily News.
 
MPP, the nation's largest pro-marijuana legalization group, is sparking the campaign in Denver with a billboard of a distraught woman and a warning for tourists.
 
"Don't let a candy bar ruin your vacation," it reads, alluding to New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd's column about eating a bit too much of a pot candy bar in a Denver hotel.
 
People interested in trying edible marijuana products are encouraged to start with a low dose of THC and only take a small bite at first. The effects can kick in up to two hours after swallowing — but you wouldn't know that from the anti-marijuana ads from the past that were filled with scare tactics and misinformation.
 
Those advertisements — often produced by agencies are organizations dedicated to maintaining marijuana prohibition — warned that pot use will make you fry your brain, hurt your children, disappoint your dog and even support terrorists."These are essentially abstinence-only campaigns, which we know don't work when it comes to behaviors that millions of people choose to engage in," Tvert said.
 
Like many others, Dowd probably saw plenty of these zero-tolerance War on Drugs or Just Say No advertisements, but not a single one about how to safely engage in the marijuana consumption if that is one's choice as an adult in a state where the drug is legal.
 

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