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No Super Bowl Ad For NORML

Category: News | Posted on Tue, October, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
no-super-bowl-ad-for-normlIn a move that seems unfair to say the least, Intuit is not advancing NORML to the third round of it’s Super Bowl Ad Contest. NORML received a ton of media coverage after it won first place in round one of the contest. One would think that taking first place in the first round, and the media love that ensued, would ensure that NORML would at least make it to the top 20 overall contestants for round 3, but sadly, that wasn’t the case.
 
Marijuana is more popular than just about anything right now, and it would have been a great thing to see a marijuana Super Bowl ad. Below is NORML’s reaction to the news. I encourage all TWB readers to tweet and post Facebook messages directed at Intuit:
 
Today, Intuit announced the 20 finalists who moved on to Round 3 of their “Small Business, Big Game” contest. Despite finishing first in the initial round of public voting (Intuit removed the ability to sort by vote popularity during the second round) and generating hundreds of media hits through Round 2, Intuit, for reasons not communicated to NORML, decided not to advance our entry to the latest round in the contest.
 
(NOTE: Intuit had opened the contest up to non-profit organizations, which NORML is. We also met their requirements in both staff and budget for being a “small business”)
 
“It is unfortunate that Intuit seems to be relying more on outdated political values instead of overwhelming public opinion when it comes to selecting which entries advanced in their contest,” noted NORML Communications Director Erik Altieri, “As demonstrated by the outpouring of support and positive media coverage for our entry, the country was ready and eager to see an ad for sensible marijuana law reforms during the most watched TV program of the year. This could’ve been a win for all groups involved, but instead Intuit will likely have only generated ill will for itself amongst the 58% of Americans who now support ending our country’s war on marijuana.”
 

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Police Dog Bites Fifth Grader During Mock Classroom Drug Raid

Category: News | Posted on Mon, October, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
dog-bits-kid-during-mockup-drug-raidI just read a very disturbing story out of Indiana. It appears that a fifth grade boy was bitten by a police dog while the police were conducting a mock classroom drug raid. Does anyone else find it ridiculous that fifth graders were used to show how a K-9 officer can find drugs? Even if a kid didn’t get bitten, this is ridiculous. The fact that an innocent kid was bitten in the process is just sad.
 
According to the Brazil Times:
 
According to the report, the officer and his K-9 partner, Max, as well as another K-9 team were requested by Clay County Superior Court Judge J. Blaine Akers to carry out a simulated raid of a party with actors in place to help “educate the Clay County fifth-graders on drug awareness.”
 
So a judge is sitting in his courtroom and one day thinks, ‘You know what would be a good way to educate the public about drug use? Have a bunch of innocent children line up, have an officer place drugs on one of them, and see if a drug dog can find which one has the drugs.’ Are there that many drug raids in classrooms in Indiana? How is this demonstration helpful to anyone? Shame on Judge Akers, I hope he feels like a total A-hole, and I also hope he is removed from his position.
 
One of the craziest things about this story is according to the media report I previously linked to, “Four scenarios were carried out that day with the incident occurring during the third scenario.” So a kid gets bitten by a dog, totally botching the demonstration and physically hurting a kid, but the show goes on for a fourth scenario? I absolutely hope that the family sues the judge and the police.
 

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New Zealand Saying War On Drugs Has Failed

Category: News | Posted on Sat, October, 26th 2013 by THCFinder
the-war-on-drugs-in-nzThe War On Drugs has been going on for far too long at this point at the expense of the taxpayers. From tearing families apart to hurting innocent bystanders, the war has been sucking economies dry all over the world. When the efforts that go in to a raid are thought of, how is it even justifiable? Government agencies spend millions of dollars to raid one grow operation, where the marijuana that is confiscated doesn't even hold the same amount of street value. Is shutting down marijuana grows really worth losing money? New Zealand doesn't seem to think so.
 
The Global Commission on Drug Policy have found that the War On Drugs has accomplished... Well.. Nothing. They stated that the war failed to achieve any of the objectives that it was supposed to. In New Zealand, the use of drugs is on the rise, while taxpayers shell out $400 million every year to enforce a prohibition that clearly isn't working. Since marijuana actually isn't a drain on the economy (the war on drugs is the real drain), the government in NZ is rethinking it's stand.
 
Julian Crawford, the leader of the Aotearoa Legalise Cannabis Party, says that "a far more effective way to undermine the black market would be to regulate and tax the cannabis trade". Finally! Leaders are starting to realize the more positive ways of using cannabis to their countries benefits, rather than using methods that hurt the citizens and government alike. Crawford goes on to say that there are innocent cannabis users that are being prosecuted and having their medicine stolen by the government. While cops are around to "protect and serve", they're definitely not protecting sick citizens.
 
New Zealand will hold a Party Vote for the ALCP, to reassure the fact that the war on drugs has failed it's mission. While a vote may just be a formality, it is an awesome thought that leaders are beginning to take note of how negatively the cannabis prohibition effects the citizens. The government needs to think of the needs of the people. Greed and corruption are unfortunately the blinders that come with every politician. But once a few leaders realize, others will follow. The truth can't be denied for long!

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Marijuana is safer than alcohol

Category: News | Posted on Fri, October, 25th 2013 by THCFinder
mj-is-safer-than-alcoholEditor's note: Dan Riffle is a former assistant prosecutor and the director of federal policies at the Marijuana Policy Project, the primary financial backer of the 2012 campaign to regulate marijuana in Colorado.
 
(CNN) -- Anti-marijuana crusaders like Kevin Sabet, while well-intentioned, are promoting policies that lead to more violence and disease in our society. In his recent CNN.com op-ed, Sabet argues we should keep marijuana illegal. But as long as marijuana remains illegal, profits from sales go to criminals and drug cartels, and adults will continue to be punished for using a substance less harmful than currently legal drugs.
 
Confused? Let's back up. For more than 80 years, our government has spent tens of billions of taxpayer dollars fighting a war against marijuana. We arrest three-quarters of a million adults every year, 87% for simple possession rather than production or sales of marijuana. Courtrooms turn into assembly lines churning out probationers -- mostly minorities -- with convictions that will make it virtually impossible to find employment.
 
The result? Marijuana is universally available, used by almost half of Americans at some point in their lives, and we've enriched murderous drug cartels fueling violence in Mexico that has claimed more than 60,000 lives.
 
Of course, we've been down this road before. During alcohol prohibition in the 1930s, federal agents raided speakeasies and busted barrels of illegally produced and imported booze. Meanwhile, bootleggers made money hand over fist, empowering criminals like Al Capone to turn Chicago into an urban war zone. And much like with marijuana today, even under alcohol prohibition most Americans who wanted a drink had no problem finding one.
 
Today, marijuana prohibition has proven itself just as disastrous a public policy failure as alcohol prohibition before it. Yet despite all the obvious similarities between the two, there's one key difference: Marijuana is dramatically safer than alcohol. 
 
Read more: http://www.cnn.com

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Research closing in on a breathalyzer for marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Fri, October, 25th 2013 by THCFinder
breathalyzer-for-marijuana
If an officer of the law pulls you over and suspects you’ve been using marijuana and might be impaired, the officer performs a field test. And if that leads to greater suspicion, well, things can escalate to a blood test.
 
But what if the officer didn’t have to take you in to get a blood test looking for that controversial limit of 5 nanograms-per-milliliter of active THC in your system that can be hard to defend against in court? At that limit, you’re assumed to be impaired the same as if you “blew” .08 in a breathalyzer test for alcohol.
 
A recent study has found that THC, the main psychoactive chemical in marijuana, can be detected from a breath test.
 
The researchers “collected” exhaled breath from chronic (those who use four times or more a week) and occasional (two times a week) marijuana users and tested them before and after they smoked a joint with 6.8 percent THC weed.
 

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Washington DC Likely To Approve Marijuana Decriminalization

Category: News | Posted on Thu, October, 24th 2013 by THCFinder
wa-decrim-mjThe Washington D.C. City Council Committee on the Judiciary and Public Safety held a public hearing last night on legislation introduced earlier this year by Councilman Tommy Wells. There is another hearing scheduled for today. Media report after media report has shown overwhelming support for the legislation. According to NBC:
 
“With the majority of the D.C. Council supporting at least decriminalization of small amounts of marijuana, it seems likely that the District’s marijuana laws will change next year…”
 
The Simple Possession of Small Quantities of Marijuana Decriminalization Act that was introduced by Councilman Tommy Wells would make possession of up to an ounce by those 18 years of age or older a civil violation, punishable by a $100 fine. Under the current law, possession of any amount of marijuana in D.C. is a misdemeanor punishable by up to 6 months in jail and/or a maximum $1,000 fine.
 
This would be a welcomed change for not only Washington D.C. residents, but also American citizens nationwide. If Washington D.C. changes it’s marijuana laws, it’s another clear sign of changing times and sends a signal to states nationwide that it’s time to reform their marijuana laws as well. I felt the same way when Washington D.C. finally implemented it’s medical marijuana law.
 
Below is a written testimony that NORML submitted, which was very well written and makes outstanding points. How do readers feel about this? Do you live in the D.C. area? If so, how do you feel about it?
 

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