Boston University To Offer A ‘Marijuana In American History’ Course

Category: News | Posted on Thu, August, 6th 2015 by THCFinder
boston university marijuana

(image via Twitter)

I was a Public Policy and Administration major (Legal Studies minor) in college, and I always loved when class discussions turned to cannabis policy. Every paper that I was able to choose the topic of had a cannabis angle on it in college. Those were very fun times for me, and it’s something that I wish every cannabis policy wonk could experience. Studying cannabis from an academic perspective is something that has been popping up on college campuses across America, usually legal or business related.

As far as I know, there has never been a major accredited public university that has taught a course on marijuana from a purely history perspective. That is until now. I received an e-mail today from Boston University which stated that BU will be offering a ’Marijuana In American History’ course taught by lecturer Seth Blumenthal. Below is an excerpt from an article that was posted about the class in BU Today, Boston University’s news and information website:

The idea for the course originated in Blumenthal’s own student days and his dissertation on youth politics in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Part of his research probed Richard Nixon’s approach to spreading marijuana use, “which he called the biggest public threat in America at the time.” Nixon, elected on a law-and-order platform in 1968, found that stance an impediment in his reelection drive four years later, when arresting young tokers and imposing draconian jail terms would alienate the voters the president needed. 

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Heavy Marijuana Use Does Not Trigger Serious Conditions Study Reveals

Category: News | Posted on Thu, August, 6th 2015 by THCFinder

Chronic marijuana in the teenage years does not cause depression, psychotic symptoms, asthma or any other conditions thought of associated to it, a recent study revealed.
Even the researchers were surprised with the results. “What we found was a little surprising,” Dr. Jordan Bechtold, a psychology research fellow at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, revealed in a press statement.
“There were no differences in any of the mental or physical health outcomes that we measured regardless of the amount or frequency of marijuana used during adolescence,” he continued.
This latest finding, published in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, contradicted to earlier studies, which reported that teenage marijuana users manifest psychotic symptoms and depression and event cancer and asthma during their later years. The study, which spanned 20 years, concluded that there is no link between marijuana use and ill-health. Young marijuana users did not even show signs of allergies, headaches or high blood pressure later in their life. 


Pot-Eating Cops Caught on Video Have Filed Lawsuit Claiming Violation of Privacy

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 5th 2015 by THCFinder

Last month, HIGH TIMES brought you a report on a vile group of Santa Ana police officers that got caught on surveillance cameras eating marijuana edibles as well as making inappropriate comments about a disabled patient during a raid at a local dispensary. Well, it seems some of the officers who have been suspended from duty as the result of the viral video have since filed a lawsuit in an attempt to prevent the footage from being used against them in an internal investigation.

According to the Orange County Register, three unidentified police officers in conjunction with the Santa Ana Police Officers Association seek to prevent internal affairs investigators with the Santa Ana Police Department from using the security footage from their May 26 raid at the Sky High Collective because they claim their privacy rights were violated. 

Attorneys for these despicable human beings argue that since the officers were under the impression that they had disabled all of the surveillance cameras in the dispensary, the video that has surfaced, and been published around the world, should not be admissible in the internal affairs investigation because none of the officers were aware they were being recorded. Essentially, the cops are suggesting that since the dispensary never obtained their permission to document their activities, the use of the video violates California state law.

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Different strategies for groups pushing legal marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 5th 2015 by THCFinder

Two groups will file petitions for ballot measures Wednesday that would legalize marijuana for recreational adult use in Massachusetts, likely setting the stage for a fierce battle at the November 2016 ballot box.

But there’s another slow-burning conflict.

The groups’ efforts represent two fundamentally different philosophies on legalization. One would create a new regulation, taxation, and bureaucratic regimen for marijuana with similarities to the way alcohol is overseen in Massachusetts. The other is more focused on individual liberty, avoiding heavy regulation or any special taxes on the substance.

At the core of the divide are questions about personal freedom, the right role of government, and to what degree marijuana commerce should be overseen by the state. But there’s also another issue at play: What would a majority of Massachusetts voters support next fall?

Voters in four states — Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska — and the District of Columbia have already legalized marijuana for recreational use.

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Survey: 79% Of U.S. Mayors Support Marijuana Decriminalization

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 4th 2015 by THCFinder


Marijuana reform is a very popular political topic these days. I remember as recently as the beginning of this decade when supporting marijuana reform was considered to be political suicide. But more and more elected officials are getting on the right side of history every day it seems. Many local elected officials are particularly supportive of marijuana reform. A recent survey of mayors in the United States by Politico magazine found the following results;

The mayors are enthusiastic supporters of the federal government taking a larger role in issues of police and criminal justice reform. One much desired area of reform: The surveyed mayors, themselves uniquely positioned to feel the brunt of the federal drug policies, overwhelmingly encouraged the decriminalization of marijuana, with 79 percent of the mayors suggesting that the federal government follow the lead of an increasing number of cities like Washington, D.C., and even whole states like Colorado.

Of course, it’s worth pointing out that cities like ‘D.C., and even whole states like Colorado’ have done more than decriminalize marijuana – they have legalized it altogether, although D.C. decriminalized prior to legalizing. But I get what the authors are saying. They should have offered up cities like Philadelphia as an example to make it more clear I think. Philadelphia decriminalized marijuana and saved roughly one million dollars in the first year.

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2016: The Marijuana Election

Category: News | Posted on Mon, August, 3rd 2015 by THCFinder

In the past few years, the U.S. has been steadily growing support for marijuana reform. From the presidential candidates to the general public, this progressive attitude has become a hot topic for debate, and as an election year approaches, everyone—from governors to legislators to those who would be president—seems to have an opinion on the issue. 

Though public opinion is shifting toward embracing cannabis reform, presidential candidates are a little more hesitant to jump on the bandwagon. Of the candidates who have expressed interest in running for the 2016 presidential nomination, only three support radical federal reform as of press time. One candidate is Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is in favor of decriminalization and medical marijuana use and open to federal legalization. Alongside him is Democratic candidate Lincoln Chafee. Having already signed marijuana decriminalization laws on a state level, the former Rhode Island governor admits recreational use could be good for tax revenues. Still, both Chafee and Sanders have made it clear they will continue to monitor Colorado before making any major decisions. Finally, Donald Trump expressed interest in legalizing drugs back in 2011 but as of press time has not released further statements on the matter.

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