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Marijuana is the top illegal drug used worldwide

Category: News | Posted on Thu, August, 29th 2013 by THCFinder
cannabis-most-used-drug-worldwide-mjMarijuana is the most popular illegal drug used worldwide, but addictions to popular painkillers like Vicodin, Oxycontin and codeine kill the most people, according to the first-ever global survey of illicit drug abuse.
 
In addition to cannabis and opioid painkillers, scientists analyzed abuse of cocaine and amphetamines in 2010, largely based on previous studies. Ecstasy and hallucinogens weren't included, because there weren't enough data. The researchers found that for all the drugs studied, men in their 20s had the highest rates of abuse. The worst-hit countries were Australia, Britain, Russia and the U.S. The study was published online Thursday in the journal, Lancet.
 
But there were few concrete numbers to rely on and researchers used modeling techniques to come up with their estimates.
 
"Even if it is not very solid data, we can say definitely that there are drug problems in most parts of the world," said Theo Vos, of the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, the study's senior author. Vos said people tended to abuse drugs produced close to home: cocaine in North America, amphetamines and opioids in Asia and Australia. The lowest rates of drug abuse were in Asia and Africa. Of the estimated 78,000 deaths in 2010 because of illegal drug use, more than half were because of painkiller addictions.
 
Vos said countries with harsh laws against drugs had worse death rates for addicts when compared to countries who relied on other policies to wean people off drugs, such as needle exchange programs and methadone clinics.
 

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Argentinian dealers arrested for using pigeons to distribute marijuana

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
drug-dealing-pigeonsBird-brained drug dealers in Argentina have been busted using carrier pigeons to get their customers high.
 
A trio of dope sellers in the Lomas de Zamora district of Buenos Aires allegedly tied up to 13 grams of pot around their winged messengers' necks to make around 20 deliveries a day.
 
Cops rumbled the small-time ring's ruse after stumbling across a lost white dove carrying a small package packed with illegal substances.
 
"It was released and we were able to follow it," a police spokesman told ABC. "Then it was a question of waiting and following again."
 
The three men, who trained the birds to fly the marijuana from their makeshift farm to the distributors' depot, were arrested.
 
Cops said that the distance between the two buildings was short, so the birds could transport "substantial amounts" every day.
 
"We talked to pigeon trainers and they told us that these pigeons were capable of making up to 20 trips per day," police chief Nesto Larrauri said.
 
"With pigeons they could ship their drugs without taking any risks," he added.
 

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Denver City Council discusses marijuana sales tax

Category: News | Posted on Wed, August, 28th 2013 by THCFinder
mj-sales-taxDENVER - On the Denver City Council's agenda on Monday was a special retail marijuana sales tax discussion.
 
The potential tax will be subject to the approval of the voters at a special municipal election to be held in conjunction with the state odd-year election on Nov. 5.
 
The sales tax would be at an initial rate of 5 percent and allows the City Council to move the rate anywhere between 3.5 percent and 15 percent without further voter approval.
 
This sales tax would be on top of the already approved state tax on marijuana.
 
The bill must pass no later than Monday in order to meet the deadlines for the November ballot.
 

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Congress to Hold Hearing on Country's Clashing Marijuana Laws

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 27th 2013 by THCFinder
congress-to-meet-about-mj-lawsSenate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., announced Monday he will address the blurred lines between federal and state marijuana laws in an upcoming hearing.
 
The hearing, which is scheduled for Sept. 10, comes as 20 states allow marijuana for medical purposes and Colorado and Washington voted to legalize recreational use of marijuana in 2012.
 
The state laws are in direct conflict with the federal Controlled Substance Act, which classifies Marijuana as Schedule 1 drug — a dangerous and illegal substance.
 
Since states began legalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes, federal authorities have been torn as to whether or not to go after businesses that are legal in a state's eyes, but illegal in the view of the federal government.
 
"It is important, especially at a time of budget constraints, to determine whether it is the best use of federal resources to prosecute the personal or medicinal use of marijuana in states that have made such consumption legal," Leahy said in a released statement. "I believe that these state laws should be respected. At a minimum, there should be guidance about enforcement from the federal government."
 
Leahy has long been concerned that the federal government has been too aggressive in its prosecution of marijuana dispensaries that are under their state's laws, legal. Since Colorado and Washington legalized recreational use of the drug, he has continued to ask the administration to clarify its approach to enforcement.
 
Federal agencies from the Department of Justice to the IRS have gone after medical and recreational marijuana businesses. In California, for example, medical marijuana businesses have been barred from deducting standard operating expenditures from their taxes. And in Montana, a federal crackdown on dispensaries, spooked state lawmakers so much that they voted to overturn the law. Ultimately, however, Montana Democratic Gov. Brian Schweitzer vetoed the repeal.
 

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The Drug War Threatens Every Americans Rights

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 27th 2013 by THCFinder
war-on-drugsIn the wee hours of February 11, 2010, police in Columbia, Missouri broke down the door to Jonathan Whitworth’s home searching for substantial quantities of marijuana. When the police forced their way into the home, Whitworth’s dogs, a pit bull and a corgi, began to bark at the intruders. The SWAT team took this as a sign of aggression and fatally shot the pit bull. The corgi was also shot, likely hit by a ricocheting bullet.
 
After searching the residence, police found a grinder, pipe, and small amount of cannabis. For the possession of a few grams of plant matter, the police had kicked in Whitworth’s door, killed his dog, and traumatized his entire family. The police even had the gall to arrest Whitworth for child endangerment, because of the presence of his seven-year-old son. In reality, the SWAT teams’ reckless discharge of their weapons posed a far greater threat to everyone in the home than a few pinches of pot.
 
Whitworth’s case is not an isolated incident. For instance, in November 2006, Atlanta police, acting on manufactured evidence of drug dealing, shot and killed Kathryn Johnston, a 92-year-old woman. When police began to break down her door, Johnston apparently (and understandably) believed they were criminals and fired a pistol once in self-defense. The officers responded to this single shot with a hail of 39 bullets. As their mistake dawned upon them, the cops cuffed Johnston, planted drugs in her home, and let her bleed to death on the floor.
 
The “war on drugs” is not a metaphor. Since Richard Nixon declared drugs public enemy number one in 1971, all levels of government in America have collaborated to militarize law enforcement, slowly turning local police, whose job is to serve and protect the public, into warriors engaged in counter-insurgency tactics in our own neighborhoods.
 
And what do we have to show for forty years of waging war against our fellow Americans? Drugs are more available, cheaper, and more potent today than they were in 1971; the illicit drug trade dominates strategically important nations, such as Afghanistan and Mexico; and, according to a Rasmussen poll released last week, 82 percent of Americans say we are losing the war on drugs. Even by the low standards of a government program, the war on drugs is an abysmal failure – and an expensive failure at that.
 
Governments in the United States have spent more than $1 trillion on fighting the drug war. That’s roughly $10,000 for every family of three. A great deal of that money pays to lock up drug offenders. Since 1970, the United States’ incarceration rate has increased fivefold and is now the highest rate in the world. The incarceration rate in Russia – a country that Americans have traditionally and justifiably associated with tyranny and our nearest competitor on this measure – is almost a quarter lower than ours. The land of the free has turned into the world’s most prolific warden.
 

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Marijuana Investment Scams Growing Like Weeds?

Category: News | Posted on Tue, August, 27th 2013 by THCFinder
mj-investment-scamsWall Street’s industry-funded watchdog, FINRA (Financial Industry Regulatory Authority) warns against investment scams growing like weeds targeted for investors attempting to tap the growing marijuana industry in the US.
 
If you talk to anyone in the growing and selling medical marijuana, you will hear a lot of talk about risks, and security systems are expensive. It’s difficult to find a bank or insurance, but laws changed at the whim of regulators and legislators.  And, because it still remains illegal, federal agents could shut down the operation and put the owners to jail.
 
Seattle-based Privateer Holdings is the first company to invest openly and raise $7 million from investors in the medical marijuana industry. Nearly 20 states have legalized the use of recreational marijuana for medical use. FINRA said, scammers are misleading investors by boosting thinly traded stocks and sell it to executives with criminal records.
 
As more states in the US are clearing the way to legalize the use of medical marijuana, the industry could reach up to $9 billion in five years. Marijuana is safe, far less addictive and subject to abuse compare to many drugs used as hypnotics, relaxants, and analgesics, which is one of its greatest advantage. Because of its little effect on major physiological functions, case of lethal overdose was known.
 
According to The Wall Street Journal Market Watch: The chief legitimate concern is the effect of smoking on the lungs. Cannabis smoke carries more tars and other particulate matter than tobacco smoke. But the amount smoked is much less, especially in medical use, and once marijuana is an openly recognized medicine, solutions may be found such as vaporization, tinctures, extracts and oils. At present, the greatest danger in medical use of marijuana is its illegality, which imposes much anxiety and expense on suffering people, forces them to bargain with illicit drug dealers, and exposes them to the threat of criminal prosecution.
 
Majority of these marijuana-related companies trades on over-the counter-markets that do not have the reporting requirements and liquidity of Nasdaq and the New York Stock Exchange.
 

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